+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 25

Thread: Recover your own grills

  1. #1
    Steve Gonzales
    Guest

    Recover your own grills

    Hi LHS Members,

    First off, A heartfelt THANK YOU to every Man or Woman that has EVER served in the Military for Our Freedom !

    This is my technique to recover your worn-out grills. It is quite involved, but once you calm down and use common sense and some ordinary tools, it is alot quicker than clamping and waiting. I discovered this method on my own. I asked questions that seemed to have the same answer, "Contact cement and clamps, wait, wait ,wait!" So after some experimenting, I developed an alternative to this. It works for me and I hope you find it useful to you. I will say that although I am showing pictures, it is up to you to find out and put your own "twist" on the method. The most difficult part is the corners, you must do a bit of material manipulation to achieve a good result. This involves doing a "test stretch" a few times to get the proper 45 degree mitre cut. The trick is to get the material to meet at the 45 AND get the resulting "dogear" waste to "begin" ABOVE the vertical thickness of the frame. In otherwords, the material that wraps around from the front to back must have coverage on the corner, yet, after you clip the waste "dogear", it must leave the corner covered. Here is a shot of the tools.

  2. #2
    Steve Gonzales
    Guest

    #2

    Lay your grill face down and orient your cloth accordingly

  3. #3
    Steve Gonzales
    Guest

    #3

    Cut your cloth about 2-3 inches bigger than your grillframe. this amount will vary with different grills like L300-"3-D" types.

  4. #4
    Steve Gonzales
    Guest

    #4

    This is how I begin: I have my hotglue gun ready to go and also a small length of wood to "press" the material down after I lay a 6" bead of glue at a time. I use a relatively narrow bead and I lay it down about 3/8" from the edge to prevent "roll-over" bulge when the bead is squashed with the block of wood in a pressing action. Hold the block on the material for about 10 seconds and move to the next 6" section. I also don't start at the exact 45 degree point, but about 3/8" from that point, the reason will become evident later

  5. #5
    Steve Gonzales
    Guest

    #5

    Here is what I mean about the block of wood being used as a press

  6. #6
    Steve Gonzales
    Guest

    #6

    Once you get a section done, continue in kind, the glue is pretty strong after a few seconds so don't worry too much about it coming loose, just be careful.

  7. #7
    Steve Gonzales
    Guest

    #7

    Like so..

  8. #8
    Steve Gonzales
    Guest

    #8

    Remember to leave a 3/8" space from the true 45 degree point. Once you've got the first end done, do the other end next in the same fashion BUT, give the material a light stretch to get most of the slack out of it. DO NOT pull very hard, just enough to get it taunt and straight. It will seem that your material is not tight enough once you've got both ends done- DON"T WORRY- it will come together once you get the sides done. The trick is to do the alignment/ light- pre-stretch and then lay a 6" bead of glue and then pull the cloth taunt slightly, THEN use the block to press it flat.

  9. #9
    Steve Gonzales
    Guest

    #9

    Here is the other end after the first 6" pass.

  10. #10
    Steve Gonzales
    Guest

    #10

    I do what are the top and bottoms of the grill first like this.

  11. #11
    Steve Gonzales
    Guest

    #11 the dreaded corners

    Once I get the two ends done and BEFORE the sides are done, I get the first corner done. This is done by taking your time and test stretching the material. Since you've got the ends partially glued down, start by test stretching that end corner of the material. Remember the 3/8" you left unglued? Now you will see why. You need that piece where the 45 degree mitre will be, left unglued ,so you can stretch the material over some. this takes some manipulation and patience. You have to see where and how much to pull on the material to overcome the wrinkles and folds. If you look at the Factory JBL corners, you will see that the weave is distorted a bit in the corners. That is because they had to stretch and pull the material to conform to the corner. Once you find this position, glue and press. Once you've got the this first half of the 45 done, trim it to a perfect 45 (the waste). This is to get a clear picture of where the opposite part of the 45 will meet it. Do the same stretch and manipulation to it and glue and press

  12. #12
    Steve Gonzales
    Guest

    #12

    See how the second part of the 45 degree cut is pre-stretched to see how far and which direction to pull is done?

  13. #13
    Steve Gonzales
    Guest

    #13

    I use these curved scissors to be able to get the ends set flat for a good trim

  14. #14
    Steve Gonzales
    Guest

    #14

    This is what I mean. See how the corner is covered and the "dogear" waste that is to be trimmed is above the corner?

  15. #15
    Steve Gonzales
    Guest

    #15

    This is the resulting look.

+ Reply to Thread

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. 70's foam grills Really!
    By Audiokarma in forum General Audio Discussion
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 05-25-2005, 10:16 AM
  2. JBL L110 Grills
    By Dave918 in forum Lansing Product Technical Help
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-04-2003, 08:41 AM
  3. Original L-100 Grills
    By Mr. Widget in forum Lansing Product General Information
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-31-2003, 07:50 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts