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Thread: What makes my JBL D130F from 1956 So special other then serial 10019?

  1. #1
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    What makes my JBL D130F from 1956 So special other then serial 10019?

    19th off the line, and all kinds of lost signature on the underside and in out the box condition too.
    You say you got a low serial number, mine is so low, its a special edition, like a Babe Ruth baseball cards, or digging up a new dinosaur, first of its kinds, completely in tact with skin and everything, Initialed by all the guys who made this speaker happen, and its a limited edition, all signed up..
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  2. #2
    Senior Member BMWCCA's Avatar
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    Are you asking rhetorically? Do you know the F-series history?

    You are probably aware that the "F" was introduced by JBL under the guidance of Harvey Gerst who I don't believe even worked at JBL until 1958. It was Harvey who actually proposed the "F" series to Bill Thomas in the '60s. Not sure why you think yours is from 1956. You could be correct, I don't know. Maybe Harvey will pop in to give us an idea. As far as I know, the markings on your cone could indicate a re-cone. Part of Harvey's modification that would be visible is the doping of the edge of the cone to prevent drying out in outdoor use. Hard to tell on yours since we have no pictures of the whole cone from the front, but it looks like you're showing a cloth surround rather than a pulp roll. The first appearance of the "F" series in the JBL catalogs in the library is 1964.

    Nice that you have a bit of audio and musical instrument history. Thanks for sharing and welcome and Merry Christmas.
    ". . . as you have no doubt noticed, no one told the 4345 that it can't work correctly so it does anyway."—Greg Timbers

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    Yes, I been making myself kinda the Nicolas Cage lately thats to this speaker.

    James first job was as a mechanic pn the only T Fords, of which he was fond of, so much so he excelled at it, and the dealership sent him to school to lean all kinds of new stuff, and handed him the means to make what ever, and he became very very good at it. The F did stand for Fender. Now I will get where ford and this speaker and the FACT it is THE 19th one, butt butt gots to keep our cool here, I am writing the super short version, or trying o, sorry for errors, pretend you are watching that Russian video on the man behind JBL, and have it try and do "good" Russian to engrish tmanmalate it for you, I am sorry, not much emumcatios, but I invents a lot, and now being disabled, my mind will not stop flowing, and I have had this speaker for years, till one day, pop, I went huh wonder do I still have, why are the "low" number on ebay are 1(02/3)then always 4 other digits, and NOT a single one even got a 10xxx, I have 10019, and I have initials all over, and thats not rust its GOOP< and ITS STILL STICKY!!!

    HOLY CRAP PEOPLE, I HAVE THE 19th OFF THE LINE IN 1956, WITH A SPECIAL STAMP, SAME MODEL NUMBER 21057, AND 013 UNDER THAT, IN A PLACE YOU CNNOT GET A STAMP INTO WITH FANCY FANCY FANCY FANCY, DID I SAY FANCY, FOR THEY ARE SO FANCY WITH THE ANGLES ACHIEVED THOUGH THE O MAKING IT A P AND WHAT LOOKS TO BE a-C-then a-G MAKING THAT "O" A P. I WONDER IN 56ISH DAYS WHO WOULD OF HAD A NAME IN THIS GOING TO MR FENDER THE MAN HIMSELF, AND BE SOOOOOOO PROUD OF THIS SPEAKER OVER ALL THE REST TO PUT MODEL NUMBER 21057 AND 013 UNDER IT AND A SYMBLE NO ONE HAS EVER SEEN BEFORE, WITH INITIALS LIKE F J K M L.N. NEVER TO HAVE BEEN TOUCHED TO WHERE THE "GOOP" IS STILL EVEN TACKY AND COULD DNA THE STUFF AND REMAK THE EXACT GLUE AGAIN!!!

    oOMGBBQROTFLCHOPPERS, THIS IS NOT, YOUR EVERYDAY SPEAKER, THIS IS THE GRANDDADDY, THIS HAS PEEPS GRAFITTI ON IT, ITS GOT A FREAKING 1950S HAND WRITTEN DATE ON IT, AND NEXT TO THE NUMBERS 156 (HMMM 1ST RUN 10(56) PERHAPS AND THEN YET ANOTHER FANCY LETTER, LOOKS LETTER N NEXT TO 156, HOW YOU GONNA WRITE OR STAMP ALL FANCY WITH CAGE AND RIBS IN THE WAY YOU WOULD HAVE TO DESTROY IT TO RIGHT THAT FANCY AND HAVE FLOW OFF THE TAIL ENDS OF THEM LETTERS THEY FADE INTO A POINT (YEAH DO THAT IN PENCIL, SHARP AND FLOWING LETTERS OF THE initials, WHEN THEY COME TO A POINT AS THE LEAD LEAVES THE PAPER CONE IN LESS THEN A 1/2 INCH OF SPACE omg AND PUTS THE SAME OLDS MODEL NUMBER STAMP SIDEWAYS UNDER THE GAGE LIP, AND VERTICAL WITH 3 MORE NUMBERS THAT CAN BE HAD SINCE IT STARTS IN A 0 THEN 13, AND A SPECIAL LOOKING BLOOB OF GOODNESS UNLESS IT WAS A PROTOTYPE OR A SPECIAL RUNS FOR SOMEONE HIGH UP :o ), WHO HAS THIS!!

    ITS NOT A EBAY SPECIAL AND ITS NEEDS A VERY SPECIAL HOME RIGHT AWAY!!!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by BMWCCA View Post
    Are you asking rhetorically? Do you know the F-series history?

    You are probably aware that the "F" was introduced by JBL under the guidance of Harvey Gerst who I don't believe even worked at JBL until 1958. It was Harvey who actually proposed the "F" series to Bill Thomas in the '60s. Not sure why you think yours is from 1956. You could be correct, I don't know. Maybe Harvey will pop in to give us an idea. As far as I know, the markings on your cone could indicate a re-cone. Part of Harvey's modification that would be visible is the doping of the edge of the cone to prevent drying out in outdoor use. Hard to tell on yours since we have no pictures of the whole cone from the front, but it looks like you're showing a cloth surround rather than a pulp roll. The first appearance of the "F" series in the JBL catalogs in the library is 1964.

    Nice that you have a bit of audio and musical instrument history. Thanks for sharing and welcome and Merry Christmas.
    The F stands for Fender, but did you know you can date (sorta) by the ohms, for in 56, when JBL was approached about his new sound and loved the D130 to be tweaked so his new digs, would want to be played on and nothing else. So in 56, our dude we know tweaked the been out forever D130, slapped on a F, Mr Fender went, BITCHIN, here's a ton of dough, and a ton more company, and everyone at JBL went YEAH!!!!!! Party like it 1899! So the older units had 8-16 homs stamped, later units had just 16 ohms stamped, and newer ones go just 8 ohms stamped into the plate.

    No I been trying to date it, and till I tried to watch that Russian video on JBL, and had to slow it to .75 speed for the translations was insane, and couldn't make a sorta sentence out of crap, you know kinda like my writing huh :O

    Oh well, his first real Job was a auto mechanic, so what better way to do HIS serial numbers, like fords where done, of which when the T come out, loved it, so I though kid, worked fav car, and plates back then started with a one, but had 5 digits in total meaning when you 19999, next plate, or speaker would then be 20000 and so forth. So thinking easy like him, for I to am a inventor, packrat been in speakers, electronics, computers, rc, and then like, I had to look further into the speaker I have, for I have 10019, with Initials by the group that had a hand in it in 1956, with a handwritten date.

    So still not getting its the 19th of the many many thousands to go after it, in the new Fender line for Fender, with Initials, and placements of said stuff that had to be done before marrying the cone and core to the cage, not ebay few after they just went, what ever slap the 21057 on it and call it done (feb 10 1957), make mine how old people with the goop still sticky for thats NOT RUST you see, its GOOP!

    Same as the rest, wanna buy my Shack Rookie card, that I really do have mint, and tell me its worth like the trashed one on ebay going for a Quarter? :O

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    OMG SOMEONE PLEASE PROVE ME WRONG!

    In a q & a of sorts was asked about the existence of there being out there a prototype that did NOT use the up to standard coil wire but coper. I know he said it was all coper, mine is copper coils, BUT HE NEVER ANSWERED THE QUESTION REALLY. NO there was none he said for that one really, but is mine different with stamp placement, and having 21057 for going to Mr. Fender for the 57 stack with these babies in it for a long time , BE a prototype for that and was approached. I have the numbers under the date of 15602, but now my brain is going full oc throttle, and need to know.

    the date, along with all the other letters in the Initials, the 50 something it looks more to me as a 52. Now if we think prototype and sloppy ass glop all over it, so thick its still tacky, has stamps, and Initials on it that had to go on before final assembly, for it has another mark on the bottom that's been driving me crazy of a L. N in what looks like paint, and NOT fancy done, who put it all together, but to pad the numbers, YES its number 19, but the 013 number under 21057, and the special symbol made just made it so no way to forge another persons initials so they went behind the ribs and cage, and my serial number is right for it being/meaning 2(February) 10(10th) 57(1957 the year they were set to go inside mister fender himself own noisemaker that everyone grew up playing on, but now with the placement of my mark, and symbol and with 013 under it, makes it prototype number 13 they been trying to perfect since 1952 when fender said make it, hence why it says 52, and all fancy, and very thoughtful on where to place everything written on the back, that NO one has ever show a picture of till now THANKS to me and my life (that mostly sucks butt), but in 51-52 and me being a inventor, and wanted to help a friend out, or company, out and say in 1952, can you do it, which would then fix my 1952 date written on it, of 4/952 for April (4) 9 (9th day in April) and 52 (fanciest 52 you ever saw) but unlike all others is 0019, and....
    21057
    013
    number 13th prototype, in 52, signed off by initials by the whole gang, for in February(2) 10 (100 57(1957 is when these are set to lose the 3 digit code near the core, and drop the 3 digit number under 21057 all Vertical, but between the ribs, and NO MORE Initials all over it, put a stamp 21057 horizontal, between the ribs down low, and lets bust some ass, we got orders to fill!!!

    So PLEASE PLEASE Prove me wrong, but really right, for it would mean I have held a piece of history, and maybe a prototype to the speaker that changed the world, omg :P and I have had nothing but a rash o crap hit the fan of which is my life, and could really use some good news! I got this far, if I am right what it could mean for the world really!

  6. #6
    Senior Member BMWCCA's Avatar
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    From this site's history pages:
    In 1963, Harvey Gerst of JBL approached Bill Thomas with a proposal to develop a ruggedized series of drivers just for the MI market. Bill approved his proposal and it resulted in the "F" series of drivers, purposely designed for MI application. They were based on the original "D" series, but used tougher suspension designs and slightly larger voice coil gaps. They were a resounding success. New OEM's such as Sunn and Kustom became major customers of JBL.
    Harvey answers some questions:
    9/20/97 alt.guitar.amps�let me take you back to the late 50s, early 60s. JBL was a small company with their main offices above a candy store, and the manufacturing scattered in a number of buildings up and down the street, near Glendale, on Fletcher Drive.
    They made the following speakers;
    the D130 a full range 15",
    the D131 a full range 12",
    the 130A a 15" woofer,
    the 130B (same as the 130A, but 16 ohms),
    and the 150 - a 15" woofer with a heavier cone.
    The D stood for a metal dome and the A and B were for woofers of different impedances. I don't remember if we made a 131A. We also made a D123 (full range pancake 12" speaker) and the D208 and D216 (both 8" speakers but with 8 and 16 ohm voice coils).
    Fender was buying D130s for use in their Dual Showman systems, but they were experiencing problems in surrounds drying out from outdoor use, and burnouts from improper mounting techniques. I wrote a memo to the president of JBL, outlining a plan to let me design a series of speakers made specifically for musical use and he agreed. My plan called for modifications to the D130 and D131, plus an all new bass 15" speaker, and a new 10" speaker.
    Since Fender was our largest purchaser, I did not want the headache of trying to re-introduce a whole new series so I kept the D130 name for the 15" and simply added an F (yes, the "F" is for Fender - don't know why to this day I did that, but I did). Since I was making up new model numbers, I decided where possible to keep it simple, so the 12" (originally the D131) became the D120F, and the new 10" became the D110F.
    That left the new bass speaker. I didn't want to leave it in the 13x range because it was different and the 150 was already being used by our theater woofer. The 140 was not being used, so I named the new bass speaker the D140F.
    After I left JBL, I understand they came out with the black crinkle finish and renamed them E series. The first major modifications were made in the K series, as I understand it.�
    Harvey Gerst

    9/19/97 alt.guitar.amps
    the F is more rugged for portable use as a musical instrument speaker as compared to home use only on a fixed environment.
    The "F" originally stood for Fender, since they were the largest purchasers, and at one time, the distributor for all the JBL guitar speakers. But the D130F speaker was not designed specifically by, or for them and the F eventually came to be just an indicator for all of the JBL musical instrument series speakers. The D130F did not have any significant frequency range differences, compared to the home version - the D130.
    I feel I must tell you there is slightly more relief on the D130F top plate to accomodate a wider variety of mounting techniques (i.e., idiots who use torque wrenches to flatten these frames onto a warped baffle board).
    Harvey Gerst
    9/7/96 alt.guitar.amps
    I saw a lot of D130's come through with fried voice coils that were running off a 12 Watt Williamson amp during the 50's and 60's. Integrated music from HiFi systems caused one kind of problem - using the D130 as a musical instrument speaker created other problems.
    That's why I suggested the D130F (which was a redesigned D130), made expressly for musical instrument amps, as were the D110F (a totally new design), the D120F (a redesign of the D131), and the D140F (a new design using existing parts).
    Power specifications for the F series were nominally 35 to about 60 Watts. How did I arrive at these figures? Pretty simple, I played guitar and bass through them and kept increasing the power till they blew. Then I downrated them from the power that fried them. Pretty hi-tech, huh? It seemed to work pretty well (of course we didn't have synth players back then).
    The major amp manufacturers back then were Fender, Sunn, Kustom, and Ampeg. Rickenbacher and Mosrite also bought some, but nowhere near the volume of the other amp makers. All had JBL speaker options.
    And yes, the "F" stood for Fender, since they were the largest single buyer, and also distributed the F series to music stores. They had no part in the design or the idea for the new series, I am solely to blame
    for that.
    Harvey Gerst

    9/11/96 alt.guitar.amps
    Q. Dick Dale seems to be the one claiming Fender went to JBL on behalf of him. In "Fender Sound Heard Around the World" he's quoted as saying the "F was invented as a result of melting voice coils & destroying surrounds". It's also stated that "the aluminum dust cover was Leo's idea". In his 9/96 GP interview he talks of the 'Dick Dale' kit available from JBL which includes a larger magnet, larger voice coil, thicker wires, aluminum dust cover, & rubberized front rim which brings the speaker (presumably a D130) up to Dick Dale & Fender specs! I'll be 'kind' and say that he comes off as 'a bit arrogant' in the interview!

    A. I never had the honor of meeting or talking to Dick Dale, so I'd have to say that perhaps his memory has been clouded by the passing years. It's true that the JBL F series was partly about improving the current 2 models being used by Fender and others, namely the D130 and D131. It was my proposal to expand the line of speakers and at the same time, make some refinements to those speakers to make them more suitable to the guitar market. Here's what I did and why:
    Opened the voice coil gap slightly on the D130F to allow more tolerance in mounting. Most people didn't realize that even though 8 mounting holes were available, only using four is the recommended mounting. And you don't screw them down tight to the board - that warps the frame. You use two fingers to do the final tightening - the gasket will them complete the seal. When you warp the frame by overtightening, the voice coil can go out of round and eventually drag and short out. I opened the gap slightly to allow for this problem with just a very slight loss in efficiency - less than 1 dB.
    Did the same thing on the D131 (and renamed as the D120F).
    Using parts from the D130A and D150 woofers, I created a new woofer designed for bass guitar applications called the D140F. This had a copper voice coil and an aluminum dome.
    Using the magnet assembly from the D123 and the basket from an LE-10, I added the D110F to complete the line of musical instrument speakers.
    The surrounds were NOT "rubberized". JBL had developed a high viscosity coating to add to the existing hifi line of speakers that reduced ringing. I used it for a different reason. The hifi speaker surrounds dried out when exposed to excessive sunlight and heat, and I reasoned the viscose coating (we called it "goop" back then) would help prevent that.
    Q. The other reference to Fender going to JBL was in conjunction with the development of the 1959 Vibrasonic. In Morrish's Fender amp book - Bill Carson recalls testing a protype JBL with a copper instead of aluminum voice coil & a thin paper cone? Can you shed some light on this obscure piece of JBL history?
    A. Bill's probably refering to the D130A which was simply a standard JBL woofer at the time - all the woofers had copper voice coils. The 130A was basically a D130 with a copper voice coil and a paper dome and was used in the 001 system primarily (D130A, N1200 xover, and 175DLH driver/horm assembly). I felt the cone was too light for bass guitar and we wound up using the cone from the 150 woofer, a heavier unit. The duraluminum dome was added to the D140F, instead of the paper dome for cosmetic reasons at first, but later proved useful in adding a little more top end to the bass (not much though).
    Q. regarding power ratings, I checked my official(3/70) JBL spec sheet for the F models and the 110F, 120F, & 130F are all rated at 100W continuous, the 140F @ 150W continuous. JBL defines 'continuous power' in my 4311B spec sheet as 3dB greater than RMS which would put the RMS rating of a D130F at 50W. On the other hand, D120Fs & D130Fs ran reliably in Showman 12s, Showman 15s, and early Boogies at considerably more power, so Mr. Gerst's & JBL's ratings are not marketing hype! It also appears that the 120F & 130F use identical magnet structures @ 11 pounds, 12,000 gauss flux density, and 275,000 maxwells total flux.
    A. The D120F and the D130F, like their close cousins, the D130 and D131, all shared the same voice coil, dome, spider, and magnet assembies, except for the slightly wider gap on the top plate. I think the flux density was really around 11,700 gauss or so on the 120F & 130F because of the slightly enlarged gap, mentioned earlier.
    Power handling was always a touchy subject and I just basically guessed at what I thought it could handle, based on normal playing. It was a little tricky since we were dealing with rock, country, jazz, and blues players and the power handling figures were just suggestions, regardless of how official the spec sheet looked.

    The D130 and the D130F were essentially the SAME speaker. Exactly the same voice coil, cone, spider assembly, magnet, basket. The only things I did to the F are listed in a previous post, along with my reasons for doing them.
    I revised the guitar ratings since those D130 ratings were for INTEGRATED music, like a symphony or a full band playing from the radio, tape or a record. The rating for a single live instrument like a guitar is much different, since there is nothing below 80 Hz or above 5 or 6 KHz coming out of a guitar (at least back then). A D130F (or a D130) could easily live with a higher power rating and we/JBL/I adjusted the rating accordingly. The new rating would also apply to a JBL D130 if used for that purpose.
    If you had called JBL back then, you would have been transferred to me and that is what I would have told you. Since I was in charge of that division, I was responsible for creating those ratings and that was
    our/my official position on the subject. As far as power handling, there was no difference - the rating was changed to more accurately reflect what the D130 or D130F could handle if used with a guitar as the source.
    The lower rating also still applied if either speaker was used for full range music reproduction. These were my "babies" and if you want to disagree with me, that's fine. If you were at JBL at the time I was designing these, we could have had some rousing discussions about it. And besides, I think I also wrote those spec sheets for the D130 as well.

    Q. A couple more Q's & I'll leave you alone - Didn't know the D140F has a copper voice coil - is it an edgewound ribbon like the aluminum coils? What were the reason(s) for using copper (vs. aluminum) in the D140F?
    A. Yes, the D140F had an edgewound copper ribbon voice coil. Copper has better heat conductivity than aluminum (think pots and pans) but it's heavier and not as responsive to high frequencies, due to it's weight. For use in woofers, copper is the wire of choice.
    Actually, had I thought about it some more, I should have probably made the D140F more of a full range speaker, but it was basically designed as a replacement for people using D130A woofers for live music.
    Harvey Gerst
    ". . . as you have no doubt noticed, no one told the 4345 that it can't work correctly so it does anyway."—Greg Timbers

  7. #7
    Senior Member edgewound's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by funboy6942 View Post
    OMG SOMEONE PLEASE PROVE ME WRONG!

    In a q & a of sorts was asked about the existence of there being out there a prototype that did NOT use the up to standard coil wire but coper. I know he said it was all coper, mine is copper coils, BUT HE NEVER ANSWERED THE QUESTION REALLY. NO there was none he said for that one really, but is mine different with stamp placement, and having 21057 for going to Mr. Fender for the 57 stack with these babies in it for a long time , BE a prototype for that and was approached. I have the numbers under the date of 15602, but now my brain is going full oc throttle, and need to know.

    the date, along with all the other letters in the Initials, the 50 something it looks more to me as a 52. Now if we think prototype and sloppy ass glop all over it, so thick its still tacky, has stamps, and Initials on it that had to go on before final assembly, for it has another mark on the bottom that's been driving me crazy of a L. N in what looks like paint, and NOT fancy done, who put it all together, but to pad the numbers, YES its number 19, but the 013 number under 21057, and the special symbol made just made it so no way to forge another persons initials so they went behind the ribs and cage, and my serial number is right for it being/meaning 2(February) 10(10th) 57(1957 the year they were set to go inside mister fender himself own noisemaker that everyone grew up playing on, but now with the placement of my mark, and symbol and with 013 under it, makes it prototype number 13 they been trying to perfect since 1952 when fender said make it, hence why it says 52, and all fancy, and very thoughtful on where to place everything written on the back, that NO one has ever show a picture of till now THANKS to me and my life (that mostly sucks butt), but in 51-52 and me being a inventor, and wanted to help a friend out, or company, out and say in 1952, can you do it, which would then fix my 1952 date written on it, of 4/952 for April (4) 9 (9th day in April) and 52 (fanciest 52 you ever saw) but unlike all others is 0019, and....
    21057
    013
    number 13th prototype, in 52, signed off by initials by the whole gang, for in February(2) 10 (100 57(1957 is when these are set to lose the 3 digit code near the core, and drop the 3 digit number under 21057 all Vertical, but between the ribs, and NO MORE Initials all over it, put a stamp 21057 horizontal, between the ribs down low, and lets bust some ass, we got orders to fill!!!

    So PLEASE PLEASE Prove me wrong, but really right, for it would mean I have held a piece of history, and maybe a prototype to the speaker that changed the world, omg :P and I have had nothing but a rash o crap hit the fan of which is my life, and could really use some good news! I got this far, if I am right what it could mean for the world really!
    I'll get right to the point. You are wrong.

    This speaker is special, only because it's a JBL. It's nothing special in JBL history. It's simply a production D130F made sometime in the 1960s. Since serial number records were destroyed in the Northridge earthquake of 1994, there is no definitive way to date your speaker, and part of the serial number is missing from the foilcal damage.

    The handwriting on the back of the cone indicates that it was reconed with a factory recone kit, most likely C8RE130 in some month of 1980...perhaps by the late great Terry Duran. She trained me in June of 1988 in the Northridge, CA Factory Customer Service Department to become a Factory Authorized Service Agency. The number "21057" is the internal part number of the cone itself. Nothing more.

    I apologize for being the bearer of news that negates your fantasy...but you did ask for it. I certainly hope you're not just trolling the forum, because the evidence seems to be that you are, and you know nothing of JBL transducer history.

    Happy Holidays. Good luck with the sale. If it works, it might be worth about $150.00 on eBay or Reverb. The frame is worth about $100.00. It needs serious restoration work.
    Edgewound...JBL Pro Authorized...since 1988
    Upland Loudspeaker Service, Upland, CA

  8. #8
    Member Flamingo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by edgewound View Post
    I'll get right to the point. You are wrong.

    This speaker is special, only because it's a JBL. It's nothing special in JBL history. It's simply a production D130F made sometime in the 1960s. Since serial number records were destroyed in the Northridge earthquake of 1994, there is no definitive way to date your speaker, and part of the serial number is missing from the foilcal damage.

    The handwriting on the back of the cone indicates that it was reconed with a factory recone kit, most likely C8RE130 in some month of 1980...perhaps by the late great Terry Duran. She trained me in June of 1988 in the Northridge, CA Factory Customer Service Department to become a Factory Authorized Service Agency. The number "21057" is the internal part number of the cone itself. Nothing more.

    I apologize for being the bearer of news that negates your fantasy...but you did ask for it. I certainly hope you're not just trolling the forum, because the evidence seems to be that you are, and you know nothing of JBL transducer history.

    Happy Holidays. Good luck with the sale. If it works, it might be worth about $150.00 on eBay or Reverb. The frame is worth about $100.00. It needs serious restoration work.
    Thanks to @edgewound for the definitive answer!

    Hey @funboy6942, I'll give you tree-fiddy...

  9. #9
    Senior Member RMC's Avatar
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    WOW, Flamingo is back! Been a while since we saw you i think. Hope you are doing well.

    Richard

  10. #10
    Member Flamingo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RMC View Post
    WOW, Flamingo is back! Been a while since we saw you i think. Hope you are doing well.

    Richard
    Hi Richard, thanks for noticing

    I'm still around, and check in from time to time - and I couldn't resist a little bit of snark in tis thread!

    but the last two years have been brutal on my business, and it's taken all I have to adapt and stay afloat when half of our income (events) vaporized. Not the least of which has been the maybe yes/maybe no aspect of our clients trying to decide if they can have their concerts, conferences and fundraising auctions.

    Otherwise doing well! I still have the Shearer Horn, and plan on fitting it with a pair of 288B on the dual-throat H1005 horn, so it can really cruise with the pair of 1505B in the big box

    I've been following some of the crossover threads with great interest, too.

    Thanks again!
    Brad

  11. #11
    Administrator Mr. Widget's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flamingo View Post
    …but the last two years have been brutal on my business, and it's taken all I have to adapt and stay afloat when half of our income (events) vaporized. Not the least of which has been the maybe yes/maybe no aspect of our clients trying to decide if they can have their concerts, conferences and fundraising auctions.
    Great to hear from you again… snarky or otherwise.

    I am so sorry to hear that your business has been hit so hard. The pandemic has certainly not affected all of us equally. Sure, the last two years have sucked for all of us, but for some it has been so much tougher than for others… and then there are those friends and family we have lost or who are still suffering with illness. I am optimistic that we will get back to “normal” someday, but it is hard to say when that will be here.

    Quote Originally Posted by Flamingo View Post
    Otherwise doing well! I still have the Shearer Horn, and plan on fitting it with a pair of 288B on the dual-throat H1005 horn, so it can really cruise with the pair of 1505B in the big box
    Glad to hear and look forward to seeing the results.


    Widget

  12. #12
    Senior Member RMC's Avatar
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    but the last two years have been brutal on my business, and it's taken all I have to adapt and stay afloat when half of our income (events) vaporized.
    Hi Brad,

    You're definitely not alone.

    Dealer i go to has a large Touring and Shows equipment business (sound, lighting, video). The first two are the bread and butter of their business i was told. They had to lay-off most of their people, kept a skeleton staff only, all events being cancelled. A real massacre.

    Then things got better and reopened for a short while, but events got cancelled again...They made some money with the Video division due to conferencing, Zoom suff, etc., not enough to pay all bills.

    My barometer is their repair shop. They have a busy shop usually 15-16 in-house repair technicians during cruising speed, but at the height of pandemic they kept only one! for emergency repairs... Last time i went there last autumn, i counted 9 repair technicians back at work, the most senior ones (i enjoy watching them work, say 10 minutes). So still missing some that had not been recalled yet. The sad part with too many in and out is that sometimes people get fed up and decide to change career for a more stable job, and you lose some good technicians.

    I do remember the large Shearer Horn, as well as Widget mentioning he was going to make some more popcorn in order to watch the show unfold... I'll be looking too when time comes, one doesn't see those big horns often! Regards,

    Richard

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