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Thread: Fixing JBL 4311

  1. #1
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    Fixing JBL 4311

    Hey,
    I've got a pair of nice JBL 4311 today.
    One is in perfect condition but the other is far from that...

    The woofer element is the 2213, It's cardboard is torn, i took the following pictures of the speaker:





    Can it be fixed or should i get a new element?

    The second thing is that the woofer screw holes got abused and this is the outcome for 3 of 4 holes:


    I think i will drill 4 holes in a different locations.

    I need to get some of the following part:

    but i don't have a clue for its name of its JBL Pro product no. Anybody?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Senior Member Fred Sanford's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by udi_hakim View Post
    Hey,
    I've got a pair of nice JBL 4311 today.
    One is in perfect condition but the other is far from that...


    I need to get some of the following part:

    but i don't have a clue for its name of its JBL Pro product no. Anybody?

    Thanks
    That's called a T-Nut, that part # on the 4312s is 61861. There's another approach that may work with the situation you have, I took a picture of mine a while back- I'll find the photo and link to the pic.

    je

  3. #3
    Senior Member Fred Sanford's Avatar
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    Another type of T-Nut, side-entry instead of rear-entry. Same thread, though, I think. You might not have enough wood left for this to help:
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  4. #4
    Senior Member macaroonie's Avatar
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    Just a suggestion

    T nuts are easy to get. Why dont you just spin the driver around say 30 deg to where you have solid undamaged cabinet to fix into. Repair the damaged bits with 2 part wood filler.
    The damaged cone can be repaired with some fine grade glass fibre matt on the back of the damaged area , just like a sticking plaster. I would not use GRP resin for this , instead use a rubberised adhesive. The glass matt provides reinforcement only.
    Once that has firmed up you can touch up the cosmetics on the front face of the cone. Ordinary vinyl matt house paint will do the trick.
    Do not be scared , these cones are pretty tough.
    Good luck

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the grate advices!
    I'll try to get some T-Nuts, now where can i find this glass matt? Which store would sell it to me?

  6. #6
    Senior Member macaroonie's Avatar
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    Glass matt

    Glass fibre supplier , boat repair yard , car body repair shop. Its a fairly fine material about the same weight as T shirt cotton but the strands are strong being glass. You only need about 100mm x 30 mm so the cost will be next to nothing.
    You will want to try to straighten out the damage just using your fingers before you start anything else. If the tear closes up well and no bits are missing you can also use some white glue ( pva ) or cone glue to seal the rip before you start with the reinforcement. Try not to get too messy on the front face of the cone and then if you are clever with the touch up the repair will be almost invisible.

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    OK now i got to the point that i need to refoam the LE25...
    Mine barely got any foam on it, i removed the glue patch which used to hold the old foam and cleaned the surface from the leftover glue...

    Where can i find replacement foam rings like these?


    I could only find those on ebay but i prefare buying it someplace else...

  8. #8
    Member tarior's Avatar
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    AFAIK, you can still buy them direct from JBL Pro.
    http://www.jblproservice.com/navigat...s%20lists.html

  9. #9
    Administrator Mr. Widget's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tarior View Post
    AFAIK, you can still buy them direct from JBL Pro.
    http://www.jblproservice.com/navigat...s%20lists.html
    Yes, but they will not ship overseas. For those living in other countries they can try their local JBL distribution network... varies widely from country to country, or simply pay the inflated eBay prices.


    Widget

  10. #10
    Zilch
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    Yes, friends, another fine example of my extraordinary woodworking skills.

    Alternatively, sheet metal strips with captive nuts installed from the rear.

    Glue 'em on the inside. You may need longer screws to reach them:
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by udi_hakim View Post
    OK now i got to the point that i need to refoam the LE25...
    Mine barely got any foam on it, i removed the glue patch which used to hold the old foam and cleaned the surface from the leftover glue...

    Where can i find replacement foam rings like these?


    I could only find those on ebay but i prefare buying it someplace else...
    Foam rings for the LE25 are NO LONGER AVAILABLE from JBL Pro.
    Get then from dougie.com on ePrey. They appear to be genuine as advertised (he stocks all (3) versions, which all show the different densities and colors). I bought a pair from this guy and was thoroughly pleased; so yes, I guess I am giving him a referral, and no, I am not associated with him in any way other than that of being a satisfied customer.
    It'll cost you less when all is said and done even IF JBL could still supply them, which they cannot. The guy ships for a flat $2 bucks, JBL wants about $9.
    I always try to support JBL first, but in this case there's not a lot of choice.

    I also would suggest NOT using fiber glass to effect your woofer repair; too heavy and overkill to boot. I would use a thinned water based glue (Elmer's carpenter glue (thined) would be fine) a small brush for applying it and a patch made of cigarette paper(s). Make the patch only as large as needed for good coverage of the wound and apply the glue judiciously. At least (2) layers of patch, one slightly larger than the first. You will enjoy all the strength benefits of lamination.
    Cut your patches and dry fit. Apply a nice film of glue. Dampen the patches and apply to the film of glue and smooth out the patch with a damp finger, completely, for 100% contact out to the edges.
    Once dry, the patch and resulting joint would be extremely strong and permanent.

    Thomas

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