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Thread: Hammonds, Leslies and more...

  1. #31
    Senior Member Hoerninger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Rinkerman View Post
    Some Hammond history for the weekend.....true or false?
    Please tell the story.
    The Hammond patent 1956350 (http://www.pat2pdf.org/) is too lengthy.
    ____________
    Peter

  2. #32
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    Thaddeus Cahill's "Telharmonium". One of the greatest unknown musical ventures in American history. Google it, or look it up..
    It was a series of generators or dynamos, all built onto a stepped shaft..the different diameters gave different pitches. Remember, this was before amplifiers...his goal was to have music on demand in homes provided by this machine...the newly invented telephone provided speakers in every house that had one. Since there were no amplifiers, the current had to be great enough to excite the carbon crystal earpieces by itself. The last generation of this machine weighed 200 tons, and was housed in Telharmonium Hall in NYC. Some of the tone generators looked like railroad tank cars, they were that big...It was not very succesful in the early 1900's, by 1912 it was dead. The size and scope of this machine and its goals, were every bit as lofty as space travel in its day. The cabling ,since it was strung next to phone lines, induced crosstalk everywhere...people threatened to destroy the building because it interrrupted phone service. Hammond got the idea for his tone generators from this invention.
    Its a long and interesting story, more interesting than the Hammond patent search, though...

  3. #33
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    In the early 1970s I knew a friend who had a Leslie. It had a wooden cabinent with slanted cut-outs for the top and bottom speakers...

    ...heavy as hell. I beleive his was ordered with JBL components...not sure if it had tubes or not.

    I remember the back was open so you could see the moving parts - very cool.


    Great sounding system - He played Santana music often. It sure beat the church music his mom pumped out at home.

  4. #34
    Senior Member Ducatista47's Avatar
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    Tony Monaco Demos the new digital tone wheel B3

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DRyQF...eature=related

    Dig it...

    While I'm at it, Joey DeFrancesco teaching drawbar settings. Stick around for the final two.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8hFRDzXIF2c&NR=1

    Clark
    Information is not Knowledge; Knowledge is not Wisdom
    Too many audiophiles listen with their eyes instead of their ears


  5. #35
    Senior Member louped garouv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by toddalin

    This is somewhat alleviated by using a high resistance coating on the buss bars that the keys actually contact. There is a buss bar for each drawbar (9) and each key has an associated gold wire (9) attached to the key that makes contact when the key is pressed. The wire pushes through the coating giving a more gradual leading edge to the wave reducing the transient noise.

    Part of regular maintenance on Hammonds includes oiling the motor and gears and rotating the buss bars against the key contacts to clean them off.
    Todd, a quick correction... my understanding is the drawbar wiring was originally palladium...
    if yours are gold, they may have been reworked a'la "prokeys" methodology...

    I'm reading all I can on Hammond organs...
    recently came into a model d - dx-20 - 31h set up...



    lots to learn

    been digging on Barbara Dennerlein's playing... wowzers
    but she's got midi pedals running string bass

  6. #36
    Senior Member louped garouv's Avatar
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    Bill Beer Leslie Configuration Details?

    So, I guess it may be a long shot, but is anyone intimately familiar with the Bill Beer (Keyboard Products was hte company name, I think???)
    modified Leslies...

    My understanding is that it may have employed solid state amplification, a Large Format JBL Phenolic Driver (with a reducer, I suppose! current offerings are conical reducers), and a JBL D140?

    In addition to the amp and driver mods, a guy that used to work for him commented online somewhere that they would overhaul the motors, and install and "
    relax new tires" - also indications are that there may have been variable speed control impelmented on some units...


    *edit* found some info ....

    > Bill's Leslies used his hand built replacement amp which was bi-amped at 100
    > / 100 watts. He used a JBL E-140-8 ohm woofer (earlier models had a JBL
    > D-140-8 ohm) for the bass and either a JBL 2482 or later a 2485 treble
    > driver - 16 ohm for the treble with a special throat adapter which reduced
    > the 2" throat to a 3/4" throat. This made for about 100 watts bass and 80
    > watts treble and allowed the bass to distort while keeping the treble fairly> clean which simulated the tube growl when pushed. (2 of his Leslies will
    > handle a 10,000 seat auditorium quite nicely for volume -- and will
    > permanently damage your hearing if you sit within 30 feet of them when at
    > full throttle.)

    > Some of Bill's organs and some of Bob Schelcher's organs (www.tonewheel.com)
    > were done with full pedals - and both used a custom multipin 36+ pair
    > industrial connector and hand-wired cabling harness to allow detachment of
    > the pedal keyboard for transport.

  7. #37
    Senior Member Steve Schell's Avatar
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    Louped garouv, back in 2003 I bought a quantity of 35 large format JBL compression drivers from a prosound company, as they were converting their cabinets to the new lighter weight neo drivers. Most were 2440, 2441, 2480 and 2482 with Radian diaphragms. The odd man out was a black JBL labeled 375 HP, which looked like a 1960s 375 only with phenolic diaphragm and a nicely machined aluminum insert press fit into the throat. They said that it had been pulled from a Leslie cabinet. Perhaps it had been installed by Bill Beer.

  8. #38
    Senior Member louped garouv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Schell View Post
    Louped garouv, back in 2003 I bought a quantity of 35 large format JBL compression drivers from a prosound company, as they were converting their cabinets to the new lighter weight neo drivers. Most were 2440, 2441, 2480 and 2482 with Radian diaphragms. The odd man out was a black JBL labeled 375 HP, which looked like a 1960s 375 only with phenolic diaphragm and a nicely machined aluminum insert press fit into the throat. They said that it had been pulled from a Leslie cabinet. Perhaps it had been installed by Bill Beer.

    That's quite interesting Steve, thanks for the input.

    Perhaps it was indeed... seems to "fit" the time/available & expedient tech.

    You don't happen to have any pics I suppose? Not that the description isn't adequate...
    But you know, never hurts to send inquiry

    Warm regards

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