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hjames
03-07-2006, 06:30 AM
I just got a copy of Dire Straits: Making Movies (Remastered) from Amazon.
Its a great album and replaces a VERY worn vinyl copy. It plays fine in my HK changer on the big system - but it turns out that when I stick it in my Mac, it doesn't recognize the disc as a CD, so it can't play it or add it into iTunes. Its on the Vertigo/Mercury label.

FWIW - I don't share music online - its for my use at home or in my iPod ...

I have some other "CDs" that aren't recognized in the computer ... an old Chris Isaac CD, a couple Marianne Faithful releases.

I didn't buy a copy of the 30th Anniversary Edition of Springsteen's Burn To Run CD/DVD release because of the Sony copyright software rootkit issues ...

If its a copy protection issue, its frustrating and insulting that record companies are driving away legitimate purchasers of music, loyal fans and supporters of the music.

Anyone else have similar issues?

JuniorJBL
03-07-2006, 07:16 AM
I do not know about what kind of software is available for Mac but try and see if you can find a program that dumps the disk to an Iso then burn it again.

Rolf
03-07-2006, 07:38 AM
Yes I got some discs that will only play on my system. If I try (read: my wife) try to play them in the car, or on the PC, they won't play. They can not be copied normally. All of these Cd's are marked "Copy Protected". What you need is a program that let's you burn a copy. I never use burned Cd's on my system, as they do not sound as good as the original, but in the car or on a PC it is OK. I am looking for a program witch can burn Copy Protected Cd's, so if anybody has a tip, please post it.


I

If its a copy protection issue, its frustrating and insulting that record companies are driving away legitimate purchasers of music, loyal fans and supporters of the music.

Anyone else have similar issues?

Rolf
03-07-2006, 07:49 AM
Just like I said above. If you have a PC get a program called WinISO or diskdump and then burn with nero or any other burning software that will burn an iso image

Sorry. Did not noticed that.:o:

hjames
03-07-2006, 07:52 AM
Just like I said above. If you have a PC get a program called WinISO or diskdump and then burn with nero or any other burning software that will burn an iso image

The problem with the disk is that it isn't even recognized as a CD when I load it in the Mac - if it can't "see" it there is nothing to copy/dump/burn or duplicate. If it could read the disk I'd have no need to copy it! I suspect it was deliberately made to not meet the usual disc format, and probably isn't really in CD format (doesn't meet the original Philps specs from the 80s).

I don't like to even insert Cds into Windows machines anymore. The Sony "copy Protection software" that got all the press a few months ago was targeted at Windows PCs. It was specifically designed to hack the Windows software and created a Root user on your PC to break links for NeroROM and similar software. But it was poorly coded, and it added instabilities to your PC, as well as providing serious vulnerabilities for other hackers to exploit.

Stupid stuff like that is one of the reasons I switched to Macs 2 years ago.

duaneage
03-07-2006, 04:11 PM
I played a copy protected disk from a cd player through my sound card right to an mP3. So much for copy protection. They should call it profit protection but they can't because it does not prevent piracy. I don't buy many Cds anymore, most new music sucks and I have better things to spend money on, like bills and motorcycles.

Robh3606
03-07-2006, 04:51 PM
I don't understand why they do that. Figure most people had it in vinyl on these re masters. That's who the audience is not some 14 year old with an IPOD. So if you buy it but you can't copy it, or play it on your computer, what a crock that is:bs:

It really pissed me off when they shut Napster down. You used to be able to find all kinds of obscure out of print stuff.

Greedy bastards

Rob:blink:

edgewound
03-07-2006, 05:01 PM
I don't understand why they do that. Figure most people had it in vinyl on these re masters. That's who the audience is not some 14 year old with an IPOD. So if you buy it but you can't copy it, or play it on your computer, what a crock that is:bs:

It really pissed me off when they shut Napster down. You used to be able to find all kinds of obscure out of print stuff.

Greedy bastards

Rob:blink:

Is it really greed? Or are they just trying to protect their industry. Maybe the reason there's such a lack of great new music, is diminishing capital to cultivate and groom new talent. Counterfeiting is illegal, too. The music industry has been RIPPED OFF big time through conterfeiting music and the big studios and the artists have been deprived of their rightful income. The music industry has a right to be concerned. How would feel if your goods and services that you make a living at were stolen only to be duplicated and sold on the black market? Making a copy of a record for your buddy is one thing....but several million copies adds up to huge revenue losses, people lose jobs, local, state and federal budgets lose tax revenue, the roads need to be fixed, levies crumble, infrastructure crumbles....yeah I know....shut up, Edge...:blink::screwy: :rolleyes: :rotfl: :bash:

Robh3606
03-07-2006, 05:33 PM
I hear you but we have a fair use law in the US where you are allowed to make copies. It all goes back to cassetes and VCR tapes. With this whole DRM deal we are going to loose that. Which means you can't make a backup of your own software and you can't drop it onto an IPOD. An IPOD is a digital Walkman with more storage than a cassete. They have been trying to kill our rights for years. It started when PC and burners became inexpensive and you could copy your own digital copies. MP3 and the internet totally blindsided them. Napster been down for years now so what file sharing software are they bitchin about now?? I don't know about you but any shared music I like I purchase. I don't buy that whole woes me :bs: they dish out. If they weren't producing garbage more people would be buying new music. Give me a break what the hell is American Idol all about. They sponsor that crap and then heavily promote them while real talent can't get an audition cause they don't seem "right" of fit the business model of some sweet young thing they can put on stage. Doesn't matter that they can't carry a tune but they sure look nice though. Instead of changing their business model they just try to blame their losses on Pirating. Maybe the RIAA should be looking off shore where the real problem is, China, and stop suing single mothers and grandparents because their 13 year old daughter or grandchild has an MP3 cash on their computer. Nothing personal but you reap what you sow.

Rob:)

Titanium Dome
03-07-2006, 09:17 PM
While it's true that your Mac won't play some of those crappy copy protected pieces of dung, there are also some regular CD players that choke on them, too. There are some CD drives that just can't handle all the extra junk thrown at them.

Like someone once said, "It's a feature not a bug." Of course, that's what a loser says when his poorly conceived, poorly coded, and poorly implemented software screws you. The loser in this case is the RIAA and all its lackeys.

You can take your legally purchased CD and exercise your guaranteed right to fairly use it for personal enjoyment, despite those corporate suit peckerhead con men who want to steal it back from you. (Who's the real thief when they steal back what they sold you?)

There's no software for Mac that will break the code (yet), but it's better not to have that potentially illegal stuff on your HD when when the government comes to lock you up for piracy because the RIAA told them to (while ignoring all kinds of real crime).

Anyway, off the soap box and on to trying to help:

http://www.macmerc.com/articles/Hacking_and_Tech_Mischief/14

Ken Pachkowsky
03-08-2006, 08:08 AM
Give me a break what the hell is American Idol all about. They sponsor that crap and then heavily promote them while real talent can't get an audition cause they don't seem "right" of fit the business model of some sweet young thing they can put on stage. Doesn't matter that they can't carry a tune but they sure look nice though. Instead of changing their business model they just try to blame their losses on Pirating. Maybe the RIAA should be looking off shore where the real problem is, China, and stop suing single mothers and grandparents because their 13 year old daughter or grandchild has an MP3 cash on their computer. Nothing personal but you reap what you sow.

Rob:)

Absolutely on the money. Its a friggin crime that they premote these acts the way they do. Aka, Jessica Simpson, Brit Spears may be a gorgeous women, but talented singers they are not. What about William Hong? Can you believe a label signed him and released a cd and people bought it!! Talent has very little to do with the recording industry these days. A highly marketable hook is the key factor and talent falls somewhere down the list. With todays electronics they could make a pig passing gas carry a tune. But then again, remember Tiny Tim?

Kudos Rob

Ken

Titanium Dome
03-08-2006, 09:22 AM
Absolutely on the money. Its a friggin crime that they premote these acts the way they do. Aka, Jessica Simpson, Brit Spears may be a gorgeous women, but talented singers they are not. What about William Hong? Can you believe a label signed him and released a cd and people bought it!! Talent has very little to do with the recording industry these days. A highly marketable hook is the key factor and talent falls somewhere down the list. With todays electronics they could make a pig passing gas carry a tune. But then again, remember Tiny Tim?

Kudos Rob

Ken


A pig passing gas, eh? So there might be a contract in my future! :D

You named two females who really buzz me off, but there are others who gall me even more, like Ashlee Simpson (how did both of those talentless Simpson chicks get contracts?--thanks Dad! :die: ), Hillary Duff, Jennifer Lopez, and Lindsay Lohan.

Let's not forget the guys, like Justin Timberlake, Ruben Studdard, Clay Aiken, Jesse McCartney, Aaron Carter, Nick Carter--arrgh! there are so many.

Why can't we just copy protect these "artists" and make it impossible for them to be played on any CD player, MP3 player, or radio? Huh? Huh? :dont-know

JuniorJBL
03-08-2006, 10:17 AM
Why can't we just copy protect these "artists" and make it impossible for them to be played on any CD player, MP3 player, or radio? Huh? Huh? :dont-know

Now we are going in the right direction!:applaud:

rek50
03-08-2006, 12:49 PM
The April 2006 rag features GeeeeK Speak on how to do it. In short, Download EAC (Exact Audio Copy) and the open-source LAME MP3, so you can encode your ripped files. Also, AUTORUN is the Enemy. Disable autorun on your optical drive. I'm NOT employed by MaximumPC:)
"It's your INALIENABLE right to copy your digital media for PERSONAL use"
Personal use is the key here. If you "Rip" to "Market" then the "Suits" have cause to flex their "Lobby" in this Of/By/For concept....

Hoerninger
04-03-2006, 10:10 AM
Copy Protected Disc Problems ... in fact nearly none.

I'm using a software probably not so often used in US, it is OS/2 by IBM. Besides that I use it for my daily work, privatly for loudspeaker calculations, I rip my LPs and burn them on CD. A Mac obviously offers much more audio software, but i can manipulate enough to get a good result.
I'm using legal software and there are no tricks to do the job, the software simply ignores copy protection . (Once there was a long hiss trailer which had to be deleted. Some copyprotected audio tracks have short brakes, i.e. nill sound).

Starting with OS/2 today as a newbe may be quite cumbersome, but usergroups are helpful and engaged and there is an easy way. Details per PM.
____________
Regards
Peter

JBL Dog
04-04-2006, 07:37 AM
I just got a copy of Dire Straits: Making Movies (Remastered) from Amazon.
Its a great album and replaces a VERY worn vinyl copy. It plays fine in my HK changer on the big system - but it turns out that when I stick it in my Mac, it doesn't recognize the disc as a CD, so it can't play it or add it into iTunes. Its on the Vertigo/Mercury label.

FWIW - I don't share music online - its for my use at home or in my iPod ...

I have some other "CDs" that aren't recognized in the computer ... an old Chris Isaac CD, a couple Marianne Faithful releases.

I didn't buy a copy of the 30th Anniversary Edition of Springsteen's Burn To Run CD/DVD release because of the Sony copyright software rootkit issues ...

If its a copy protection issue, its frustrating and insulting that record companies are driving away legitimate purchasers of music, loyal fans and supporters of the music.

Anyone else have similar issues?

I purchased a stand-alone TASCAM burner a few years ago to transfer copyright protected discs to a format that can be read by my PC. Just take the digital out from a single-play cd player and hook it up to any stand alone burner and you're up and running. $200 (or so) investment and problem solved.

For those concerned, I don't do the flea market circuit. No flames please!

:D

JuniorJBL
04-04-2006, 07:47 AM
There are most certainly many ways to do it, and that is a good one!!

hjames
04-04-2006, 08:01 AM
'Spose I should've posted an update on this a few weeks back, but I've been busy getting the yard and pond ready for spring ...

After some tests I found that it wasn't actually a problem with the disc, it seemed my Mac Superdrive (DVD/CD writer/reader) had failed!
Fortunately I have Applecare (extended warrantee) so after a bit of runaround with their customer support folks explaining that I am technically proficient and yes, I know its not normally a customer-servicable item, but I have a CATV engineering background and worked in a computer shop for a few years, they relented and shipped me a new optical drive. Once I got that installed, I was able to rip the songs from my discs just fine again. Problem solved, and no need for extreme hardware or shareware solutions!

Yes, I did all that shareware/freeware stuff when I had a Windows machine a few years ago, but if I have to dupe every CD I own when I buy it, its frankly not worth the grief. This way I can play the CDs directly downstairs with the big JBLs or put them on my iPod for roadtrips (like mixtapes), or even stream music playlists at my desk or through the house down to the main stereo via airtunes (like my own personal radio station).

Airtunes may not be quite the fidelity of playing discs directly, but when I'm in the kitchen cooking it beats running back and forth changing discs with food on my hands.

Titanium Dome
04-04-2006, 10:42 AM
(snip)

Airtunes may not be quite the fidelity of playing discs directly, but when I'm in the kitchen cooking it beats running back and forth changing discs with food on my hands.


Airtunes does totally rock for its intended use. I just put my PowerBook on the kitchen counter while I prepare food, cook, do the dishes, or whatever, and it's like having a huge remote control right there. The best part is I don't need a line of sight.

If my GF says it's too loud (often) or can you change the music (less often), it's easy. I don't even need to leave the kitchen, let alone look for another CD, take the old one out, put the new one in, put the old one away, etc. I just scroll (or search) and click, and I'm done. :rockon2:

Akira
04-05-2006, 03:57 PM
Nothing personal but you reap what you sow.

Rob:) Right on! The record companies are the thieves. They have been stealing money from musicians and the public for years. What about those legendary Mowtown artists that created the sound and are poor to this day. That's why the Beatles and all those bands from that era purged them once they gained the clout to do so. How many vinyl albums were you forced to replace with CD's? Back in the late 80's Sony music bought the biggest names in music to force the public to once again dump CD's for the mini disc. George Michael sued them estimating 5 mil, loss of income because they would only issue his product on mini disc. AND THE BIGGEST CRIME OF ALL... the 21 cent surtax on all blank discs that goes directly into the pockets of the record companies. Do you know how that started? Years ago when you used to play vinyl, these same jerks said you were not allowed to copy your own material onto cassette to play in your car. They wanted you to buy the product twice! So the superior court reached a compromise that added the 21 cent surcharge to cassettes and now to blank discs even if you only use them for computer purposes...talk about double dipping.
AND: You want to blame the poor quality of Mp3's and music in general...look no further than those same band of thieves! Once upon a time they used scout and sign bands, record and groom them. They lost money on 90% of the contracts but, made a killing on the 10%. Then they decided new blood could be obtained cheaply if they were approached by artists who produced their own music, reducing their role to merely distribution companies. So what if the product was a little worse. WE HAVE ALL SUFFERED....YOU REAP WHAT YOU SOW.
p.s. having been in the music business for 20 plus years I can tell you about the money scam that happens when a band signs that million dollar contract, but that would take up the space of a book. The short version: You never see a cent because they make sure you can never repay your bill. The artist gets the publishing. The record companies own the CD sales.

Akira
04-05-2006, 03:58 PM
forgot one thing. The easiest way to copy audio (if you have the means) is to go SPDIF out onto your computer.

btw: While down loading in Canada is legal (for personal use) I would gladly pay money for quality. My daughter paid for a download from itunes. You are allowed only 5 transfers. (ie: computer to ipod) BUT, you can not burn a disc even when you paid for it! So it can't be played on the home stereo or in the car. If she updates her ipod, that counts as a transfer. The lesson she has learned? ....Doesn't pay to play by the rules.

Titanium Dome
04-05-2006, 04:34 PM
forgot one thing. The easiest way to copy audio (if you have the means) is to go SPIF out onto your computer.

btw: While down loading in Canada is legal (for personal use) I would gladly pay money for quality. My daughter paid for a download from itunes. You are allowed only 5 transfers. (ie: computer to ipod) BUT, you can not burn a disc even when you paid for it! So it can't be played on the home stereo or in the car. The lesson she has learned? ....Doesn't pay to play by the rules.


Really? Are the rules different in Canada? I can burn it all day long to CDs as long as I don't burn the exact playlist in the same order more than seven times. I've never had a problem burning any purchased song to CD.

Don't you guys have to pay a tax on blank media to cover this?

Akira
04-05-2006, 04:42 PM
perhaps you are right? I am taking the word of a very upset little girl. I never bothered to check it out myself as I can copy anything I want using standard SPDIF pro gear.

Earl K
04-05-2006, 05:44 PM
Don't you guys have to pay a tax on blank media to cover this?

I believe the answer is yes. There's a "hidden tax" built into the price of the media .
Those monies are supposed to be distributed back to the entertainment industry at large .


:)

JuniorJBL
04-05-2006, 06:13 PM
Those monies are supposed to be distributed back to the entertainment industry at large .


:)


Large indeed :yes:

duaneage
04-08-2006, 11:53 AM
When CDs took off they went from making 67 million records a year to 2.3 million a year later (I think it was 87/88) and then tapered it off even more. This really pushed people into getting CD players. The end of the 8 track was even quicker. What followed were obscene profits on the Cds for the next 10 years until the internet and mp3 format arrived.

I must have missed the part where they are legally guaranteed profits which are greater year after year no matter how God-awful the product is. All industries face new challanges and threats to their supremecy, but the entertainment industry feels they can hide behind outdated copyright laws, bought politicians, and civil litigation against their customers. Can you honestly say the music scene today is as good as or better than it was 20-30 years ago? Technology has replaced talent making it too easy to turn out a product. Maybe it is all overvalued to the point where if it was not downloaded it would be largely ignored.

I spent enough money on music the past 20 years, I'll enjoy what I have and listen to the radio for background noise.

Titanium Dome
04-08-2006, 01:35 PM
I haven't purchased a CD in a couple of years unless I downloaded it first and determined I really wanted/needed the slightly higher resolution OR if I heard it somewhere else and had to get it, like with Neil Young's Prairie Wind.

A few years back, I'd buy four or five CDs a month at least, sometimes more. In retrospect, I could have done without most of them, and with many the sound quality was not that great. Now I can download a few tracks @ 99 cents, and if I don't like it, I'm done. If I do like it, then I'll go for the CD at the best price I can get.

So, five CDs at an average of $16 equals $80.

Three downloaded tracks each from five "albums" equals $15, plus let's say I actually like and buy one of the albums on CD @ $16 equals $31.

Who's smiling now? :D Not the record companies.

morbo!
05-20-2006, 07:51 AM
Thanks to sharing I hear music that i would otherwise not have heard .
The quality isnt as good as the original
So im lightly too buy the original if i like it that is.
Im defanitly sending peter pringle a few $bux$ too hear him in full resolution

How many records did i buy cause i liked a song and the rest of the album was complete crap

I think sony got sued here a bit back for the protection thing
had to refund or replace the money of any1 who had a copy protected cd(or somthing like that)

hjames
05-20-2006, 09:35 AM
I haven't purchased a CD in a couple of years unless I downloaded it first and determined I really wanted/needed the slightly higher resolution OR if I heard it somewhere else and had to get it, like with Neil Young's Prairie Wind.

A few years back, I'd buy four or five CDs a month at least, sometimes more. In retrospect, I could have done without most of them, and with many the sound quality was not that great. Now I can download a few tracks @ 99 cents, and if I don't like it, I'm done. If I do like it, then I'll go for the CD at the best price I can get.

So, five CDs at an average of $16 equals $80.

Three downloaded tracks each from five "albums" equals $15, plus let's say I actually like and buy one of the albums on CD @ $16 equals $31.

Who's smiling now? :D Not the record companies.

The only thing I bought new out of the box lately was the new CD from Paul Simon: Surprise - I heard 3-4 songs on NPRadio before it was released, AND Amazon had a preorder price of $10. Otherwise, I usually buy used CDs.
Used discs usually play fine and cost $3-7 each - with very few exceptions.
Well - I'm waiting on Bob Wills: the Tiffany Transcriptions Vol 1 ($9), Too Much Fun: Best of Commander Cody and the Lost Planet Airmen ($7), and Monk's Brilliant Corners (I think that one cost me $8 - so the order of 3 Cds with shipping was around $30) .
Its VERY rare that I'd pay $16-20 for a single disc album ... unless it was a birthday gift for a close friend or something.