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Mr. Widget
02-01-2006, 11:15 AM
Thanks Steve for taking the time to shoot the pics and for posting those incredible photos of all that JBL gear.

http://audioheritage.org/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=9120

I am glad to see that today's JBL is acknowledging that there was a JBL before the L100.:D I hope they eventually give the collection a proper venue that can be shared with the public.

Widget

Steve Schell
02-01-2006, 11:35 AM
Thanks Mr. Widget. I feel so fortunate to have been given the opportunity, the least I could do was share the photos. I feel bad that some items were given short shrift, like the two speakers in the distance on the left of the lower of the two hallway photos. I missed those almost entirely. It was such a gas to see the rare Iconics; I had known of the existence of them for about six years now, but had never seen them as they usually live on pallets in some inaccessible warehouse location.

If any forum participants would like higher res versions of one or two of the pictures, I could entertain a few requests. The original file sizes are about one meg, and I had to really murder them to put them in the forum. Address requests to stfrsc*at*juno.com .

edgewound
02-01-2006, 01:22 PM
Great effort, Steve. That must've been a great day. You are indeed, quite the Audio Historian.

:applaud:

mikebake
02-01-2006, 01:28 PM
Steve, are the units on display owned by/stored at JBL, or are some from individuals? Just curious. Wonder what else they might still have around.

Steve Schell
02-01-2006, 04:01 PM
Mike, as far as I know all the exhibit items are from JBL's collection. They do have more than is on display here, but I don't know how much. Since this exhibit was assembled in part for some visiting dignitaries, the focus was on pretty pieces in good condition. Their old Lansing 15XS theatre woofer with the missing cone didn't make the cut.

Robh3606
02-01-2006, 04:19 PM
Hello Steve

It's nice to see a company that actually cares about it's past and the legacy that has been left behind by others over the decades. The pictures look great. I would really like the driver cross sections. I always loved the L100 that one of the stores had. That's cool being able to see the different geometries used on the various drivers through the years. Thanks for sharing this with us.

Rob:)

jbljfan
02-01-2006, 04:42 PM
Thank you Steve and to JBL for sharing.

Steve
02-01-2006, 07:16 PM
Steve

Thank you for your post.... exciting, informative and fun.
The only thing missing from your excellent post was that wonderful musty smell of old speaker componets. : )
Or being able to touch a piece of history.

Thank you for your time, dedication and never ending enthusiasm.
It is contagious.

Maui Steve

scott fitlin
02-01-2006, 07:49 PM
Its really nice to see all that really old JBL stuff. Thanks for sharing Steve, great pictures and detailed accounts!

http://www.dtourism.com/forums/images/smilies/waveall.gif (http://www.dtourism.com/forums/misc.php?do=getsmilies&wysiwyg=0&forumid=2#)

jim3860
02-01-2006, 08:33 PM
Great job, First class all around. components. pics. narrative. Most of us would never have a chance to see some of these items. THANKS for SHARING :applaud:

Titanium Dome
02-01-2006, 09:05 PM
Thanks for taking the time to post it.

Tom Brennan
02-01-2006, 09:12 PM
I love it. Great stuff Steve, thanks.

Phil H
02-01-2006, 09:28 PM
Steve,

Thank you. I keep going back and looking at your pictures. It is nice to see a little bit of history being preserved. By the way, the LE8T speaker looks like the C-48 Madison enclosure (http://www.lansingheritage.org/images/jbl/catalogs/1962/page22-23.jpg). There was a nice pair on eBay recently that did not meet the sellers reserve. Bids went up to $833. It had LE8's with whizzer cones. http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&ru=http%3A%2F%2Fsearch.ebay.com%3A80%2Fsearch%2Fse arch.dll%3Ffrom%3DR40%26satitle%3D5857940152%26fvi %3D1&item=5857940152&rd=1

DRG
02-02-2006, 04:48 PM
Thank you Steve. Very nice!

hapy._.face
02-02-2006, 06:15 PM
So cool! Thank you! I gotta free nickel tour. Looks like "oldmics'" shop! :blink:

sonofagun
02-02-2006, 06:52 PM
I bet they'd like to have some L100s to display with new grilles!

Hopefully in a few weeks I could supply them. Maybe we should let them know.

sa660
02-03-2006, 12:41 PM
Thank you

Steve Gonzales
02-04-2006, 10:02 AM
Very cool Steve, I love seeing the historic pieces. I am very interested in the Cogent compression driver too. Please tell us a bit more about that. I really appreciate this thread and the effort to share it.

kegrdude
02-04-2006, 02:39 PM
Steve,
As a new member to the JBL owner scene , I would personally like to thank you for your efforts in bringing the tour to us not so fortunate members. Beautiful pics

Thanks
Mike :cheers: :scoot:

Steve Schell
02-05-2006, 12:51 AM
Thank you all for your kind comments about the history exhibit pictures. I may be speaking out of turn, but there may be more pictures of the exhibit coming your way before long.

Steve G., the Cogent bass driver is our attempt to revitalize an extremely valid though little explored technology. In 1933 the sound engineers of Bell Telephone Laboratories took on the challenge of attempting to reproduce the sound of a full symphony orchestra, in a large auditorium, for a live audience. By all accounts their efforts were very successful. Beginning with a clean sheet of paper, they designed a very large compression driver (20" diaphragm) to drive a large folded reentrant bass horn to cover the frequencies from 50 to 300Hz. This design approach was not followed by the Shearer Horn team a couple of years later, although many other aspects of the Bell Labs two way horn system, or Fletcher System as it was called, were incorporated into the Shearer Horn. We enjoy many of the design innovations of the Fletcher System in our JBL systems today.

The reluctance of the Shearer team to build a bass compression driver is understandable, as they were attempting to design a practical system for theatres that could be manufactured economically. It is a shame, though, that the concept of the bass compression driver disappeared until its rediscovery by small perfectionist manufacturers in Japan many years later. Those who have heard this technology implemented well marvel at the accurate and lifelike bass that is made possible with this approach.

My partner Rich Drysdale and I have been developing both a midrange / high frequency compression driver and a companion bass compression driver. The Cogent DS-1428 midrange driver is based on the superb RCA MI-1428B compression driver of the late 1930s. Those interested in finding out more about this driver and our attempts to build a modern version can check out my now somewhat dated article on my friend Jonathan Weiss's site here:

http://oswaldsmill.com/id29.html

We have done several things to make our driver more suitable for modern hi fi and home theatre systems, but many basic concepts are carried over from the RCA.

The Cogent DS-1448 bass compression driver is a scaled up version of our 1428. The motor is basically the same, but the diaphragm is larger and the phasing plug is optimized for bass duty. When fitted to an appropriate horn, its performance is pretty darn good, the best bass I've heard so far. This compression driver approach yields clarity, impact and overall naturalness that I have not heard before. Those Bell Labs guys were some smart folks.

My partner Rich and I are planning to begin initial production of the drivers within another month or so. One aspect which has delayed things a bit has been the completion our patent application on the DS-1428 phasing plug, which we feel contains some novel features. This enterprise has been, for the past 2 1/2 years, the most engaging, rewarding, financially draining, wild ride of my life.

I have attached pictures of the two drivers and the two way prototype horn system we recently demoed in Las Vegas.

jim3860
02-05-2006, 01:05 AM
Thank you all for your kind comments about the history exhibit pictures. I may be speaking out of turn, but there may be more pictures of the exhibit coming your way before long.

Steve G., the Cogent bass driver is our attempt to revitalize an extremely valid though little explored technology. In 1933 the sound engineers of Bell Telephone Laboratories took on the challenge of attempting to reproduce the sound of a full symphony orchestra, in a large auditorium, for a live audience. By all accounts their efforts were very successful. Beginning with a clean sheet of paper, they designed a very large compression driver (20" diaphragm) to drive a large folded reentrant bass horn to cover the frequencies from 50 to 300Hz. This design approach was not followed by the Shearer Horn team a couple of years later, although many other aspects of the Bell Labs two way horn system, or Fletcher System as it was called, were incorporated into the Shearer Horn. We enjoy many of the design innovations of the Fletcher System in our JBL systems today.

The reluctance of the Shearer team to build a bass compression driver is understandable, as they were attempting to design a practical system for theatres that could be manufactured economically. It is a shame, though, that the concept of the bass compression driver disappeared until its rediscovery by small perfectionist manufacturers in Japan many years later. Those who have heard this technology implemented well marvel at the accurate and lifelike bass that is made possible with this approach.

My partner Rich Drysdale and I have been developing both a midrange / high frequency compression driver and a companion bass compression driver. The Cogent DS-1428 midrange driver is based on the superb RCA MI-1428B compression driver of the late 1930s. Those interested in finding out more about this driver and our attempts to build a modern version can check out my now somewhat dated article on my friend Jonathan Weiss's site here:

http://oswaldsmill.com/id29.html

We have done several things to make our driver more suitable for modern hi fi and home theatre systems, but many basic concepts are carried over from the RCA.

The Cogent DS-1448 bass compression driver is a scaled up version of our 1428. The motor is basically the same, but the diaphragm is larger and the phasing plug is optimized for bass duty. When fitted to an appropriate horn, its performance is pretty darn good, the best bass I've heard so far. This compression driver approach yields clarity, impact and overall naturalness that I have not heard before. Those Bell Labs guys were some smart folks.

My partner Rich and I are planning to begin initial production of the drivers within another month or so. One aspect which has delayed things a bit has been the completion our patent application on the DS-1428 phasing plug, which we feel contains some novel features. This enterprise has been, for the past 2 1/2 years, the most engaging, rewarding, financially draining, wild ride of my life.

I have attached pictures of the two drivers and the two way prototype horn system we recently demoed in Las Vegas.

*** I can't load the pictures. The file sizes are small, but the format sizes are apparently too large. I'll have another go at this tomorrow. let us know when there ready for the market. I like new stuff.:D

sajt
02-05-2006, 02:12 AM
i had enjoyed all the topic, PLEASE MORE PHOTOS! about the vintage JBL-ALTEC s

spkrman57
02-05-2006, 06:32 AM
Some of us horn lovers would like to know if those drivers when they hit production will be affordable to us bottom feeders?

Sweet looking drivers! No doubt they will not be cheap!

Ron

Maron Horonzakz
02-05-2006, 07:47 AM
Yes i too wonder will this be affordable? Or just out of reach to members here. JBL drivers are now in the $ 1500 and up range now. How can that unit compete with JBL & TAD even if the sound is equal? I cant see it being better. That will be up to the customer to decide. How can manufacturing costs be reduced to make it competitave. This unit could be still born if not affordable. You Know JBL will find a way to come up with a comprable driver If this becomes popular. They wont be left behind. Look at the K2 drivers.;)

Tom Loizeaux
02-26-2006, 06:29 PM
Steve, Thanks for sharing your trip to JBL with us!
I'm glad to see that people at JBL cherish their heritage too.

Tom

pocketchange
02-27-2006, 08:09 PM
Concerning the Metregon, which finish is it? I'll guess Dark Walnut
(Actually I'm attempting to determine the finish on my Metregon, which looks just like the one in the picture Steve took).

hjames
03-20-2006, 04:16 AM
Thanks to Steve and Don for taking time to shoot and contribute photos to this display. And thanks to JBL for building such awesome speakers, and for keeping such an archive of their history! Keep up the good work, guys!

Charley Rummel
03-24-2006, 08:35 PM
So, when are they going to team up with the companies that produced the classic electronics that drove thos treasures and bring 'em to life???

Cordially,
Charley Rummel

Rusnzha
03-24-2006, 09:00 PM
Hello Steve

It's nice to see a company that actually cares about it's past and the legacy that has been left behind by others over the decades. The pictures look great. I would really like the driver cross sections. I always loved the L100 that one of the stores had. That's cool being able to see the different geometries used on the various drivers through the years. Thanks for sharing this with us.

Rob:)
I remember that, it was cool! Wasn't it in a store window somewhere on the north side of E. 42 st?

Tom Loizeaux
03-25-2006, 08:48 AM
So, when are they going to team up with the companies that produced the classic electronics that drove thos treasures and bring 'em to life???

Cordially,
Charley Rummel

Harman does own Crown Audio too!

Tom

JBL 4645
04-08-2006, 12:44 PM
WOW I was drooling all over that, what an incredible line up.:)