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saeman
05-15-2005, 07:47 PM
Just brought her home from the beauty shop today. Her sister Rose is still there and will require a lot of work, being the uglier of the two. Maybe in a couple weeks if I can stay on track. Still need a couple more coats of oil and will need to make new grills (hope that roll of Blue Cloth comes thru as I'd hate to use my wife's old drapes). Took the grills off one of my walnut 4350's for the pic. Waiting for the 2231A's to come back with new cone kits installed and will get this one buttoned up. Everything was restored to original (except for the Rosewood veneer and trim or course) - new baffle paint and velcro tabs, new black removable base and eye bolts in the bottom. First time I've done anything major in Rosewood and I'm pleased with the results. I do love these big monitors - wish I had a big enough house to have a pair in every room. My wife rarely says anything but she'd probably draw the line on that idea. Pics at www.lubecentersys.com/4350resto (http://www.lubecentersys.com/4350resto). Rick http://audioheritage.org/vbulletin/images/smilies/smile.gif

saeman
05-15-2005, 08:01 PM
I apparantly need a tutor to tell me how to include pics with a post. Giskard helped me out last time and I still haven't figured it out. I tried to include a couple pics with this post but they don't show up. "Push The Button" - "Get A Banana" right, even a monkey should be able to do it. Maybe a step - by - step from someone out there will get me on track. Thanx

saeman
05-15-2005, 09:00 PM
Looks like I figured it out, with some help!! Thanx Audiokarma


I apparantly need a tutor to tell me how to include pics with a post. Giskard helped me out last time and I still haven't figured it out. I tried to include a couple pics with this post but they don't show up. "Push The Button" - "Get A Banana" right, even a monkey should be able to do it. Maybe a step - by - step from someone out there will get me on track. Thanx

Mr. Widget
05-15-2005, 09:15 PM
Now that is a nice looking 4350! :applaud:

Congratulations!

Widget

geowal3
05-15-2005, 09:52 PM
Rick,

You are not being clear to all the boys and girls out there: You did the refurb & veneer work; stunningly beautiful!:applaud:

Ken Pachkowsky
05-15-2005, 10:25 PM
Hmmm. Simply friggin beautiful!

Congrats

evans224
05-15-2005, 10:58 PM
Uh, WOW!!

mech986
05-16-2005, 01:42 AM
Absolutely Gourgeous!!! The size of the speaker lets all that Rosewood grain come out. Can you tell us more about how you did it?


Thanks.

Bart

saeman
05-16-2005, 06:14 AM
Here's some of the guidelines I follow when I decide to renew some of these old monitors. My goal is usually to restore to original. Unfortunately JBL used strictly walnut veneer and to find the quality of veneer that they used is near impossible. The stuff on the market today is not the same. Cut from younger logs and you just can't find the tight grain walnut that came from old old logs years back. The result is veneer that is more open grain. When oiled up it always appears much darker. If you look at JBL's old monitors, in good shape with good veneer, the veneer almost has an orange tint to it. That's the look that is impossible to achieve. I've tried bleaching the veneer and using all sorts of light stain washes with no success. So.....why not try things like oak and rosewood......I have a pair of 4341's that need work and I will do them in walnut regardless of these concerns. They are quite rare and need to be accurately restored...... First thing to look at when doing a restore job is the veneer. It needs to be tightly bonded to the base wood. If there are a few small bubbles you can deal with them but if there are major lifts you can't veneer over them and they're real hard to lay back down. I will usually slit open the small bubbles and shoot glue under them with a hypodermic, then pressing them flat with weight. To remove the old veneer is a major major job. From a starting point with tightly layed original veneer, first thing to do is strip off all old oil as the new veneer will not glue bond to an oiled surface. Use oven cleaner. It strips the oil quick and is water soluable. Then fill and deck flat all dents and chips in the surface. Don't waste your time trying to rebuild edges and corners with big clobs of plastic wood as they are weak spots that can break out in the future. Shallow dents need to be gouged out deeper to allow a good fill that will adhere to the wood. I've used all sorts of fillers - plastic wood, epoxy and automotive bondo. All have worked well. Epoxy is harder to sand and deck flat sometimes. After the cabinet is stripped of all old finish and all surface irregularities are corrected - set up an edge guide and cut off the front edge trim using a straight router bit. If the cabinet corners are trashed, cut the whole corner or edge out 3/8" x 3/8" and glue in new wood (to match that used in the cabinet). After the glue dries trim it flush with a flush cut laminate trim router bit. There are a couple of pics showing this in those that I have posted. At this point you should have a box with no front trim, but 8 perfect corners and all razor sharp edges and you're ready for veneer. Will continue a bit later - time to head for work. Rick

saeman
05-16-2005, 10:11 AM
With the cabinet ready for veneer you basically have two directions to go - 1. use veneer with self adhesive backing or 2. Use paper back veneer that has to be glued onto the surface. I have used both and they are readily available........ The self adhesive backed veneer is not my first choice although it is a quicker and easier job to apply it. If you choose that type of veneer, the cabinet surface MUST be absolutely clean and flat. I will brush apply usually two coats of polyeurethane varnish and lightly sand smooth and then clean the surface with a rag dampened with mineral spirits. The veneer adhesive will adhere much better to that surface than it will to just bare wood. After laying the veneer down you will need to go over the entire piece with a clothes iron (NO STEAM) at medium heat and a veneer roller. When rolling you need to listen for a crackling noise nder the roller as you move along. That indicates a lack of bonding and air trapped under the veneer. Roll until there is no crackling heard. If you end up with a small bubble of trapped air you can lightly cut a small slit in the bubble with an exacto knife and vent the air and then heat and roll again. If the bubble persists you will need to apply additional glue thru the slit. Don't use wood glue as it won't bond well to the poly coated surface or the adhesive backed veneer. Use a quick set exoxy in very small amounts. Squeeze out the excess and solvent clean the veneer before it dries on the surface. Clamp it down and let the glue set. That's the only option I know for bubbles with this type of veneer. There may be spots under the backing paper where there is insufficient adhesive (from the manufacturer) but you have no way of seeing it, or knowing it's there until you lay down the veneer. It's happened to me a couple of times.......Paper back veneer that requires glue application is the choice that, for me, has yielded the best results. You need to start with a clean surface, stripped of any oil or paint and sanded with 100 grit paper to rough it up a bit. To the cabinet surface and the veneer, I apply a coat of Tite-Bond II glue using a 3" paint roller. As soon as that first coat tacks up/dries to the touch, I apply a second coat and walk away until the next day (no longer) and let it dry. On the next day I apply another coat and after it is dry to the touch (turns transparent) but you can still penetrate it with your fingernail, I lay it down on the cabinet surface and start heating/rolling as described before. The heat of the iron will lightly melt and reactivate the glue and bond the two surfaces together. TOO MUCH HEAT will melt/puddle the glue and you'll be in trouble. Start with medium heat and keep the iron moving. You might want to practice on some scrap wood before smoking a $30-$40 piece of veneer. Always cut your veneer leaving 1/4" or so overhang all around. After the veneer is in place, trim the overhang flush using a laminate trimmer. Go all around the edges and run your finger upwards in the direction of lifting the veneer and listen for loose edges (like paper pages when thumbing thru a book). With the veneer trimmed go around all the edges again with the iron and veneer roller. After that take a flat block with 120 grit and sand the veneer edges FLUSH with the cabinet sides. Sand ONLY down, in the direction of bonding and not lifting. You're now ready for the next piece. I always veneer the cabinet bottom FIRST, then the sides so the side veneer will cover the exposed edge of the bottom veneer. Do the top last so it's veneer covers the exposed edges of the two side pieces. Man - I'm out of control here and getting windy but you asked. Let's end it here - will add more info on trim and finish when my fingers are rested. Rick http://audioheritage.org/vbulletin/images/smilies/smile.gif http://audioheritage.org/vbulletin/images/smilies/smile.gif

Robh3606
05-16-2005, 10:15 AM
That looks great!


Rob:applaud:

Regis
05-16-2005, 11:35 AM
You must have one excellent wife! "Honey, I want to put a pair of speakers in the living room and they only weigh about 260 pounds apeice!" I skimmed the veener instructions and frankly I'm amazed at how thorough you were. You can tell, because the quality is beatiful. We wanna see pics when it's d

http://audioheritage.org/vbulletin/images/smilies/applaud.gif
one!

saeman
05-16-2005, 12:16 PM
OK - My fingers are rested. Remember guys, my way may not be the only way and I'm not the gospel. Old Dog - Old Tricks. Some of you out there could probably add to this long winded thread with some other tricks. At this point we're looking at a veneered cabinet but it needs trim. You can go two ways on installing the front trim on the big JBL monitors. Almost all of them have a 30 degree bevel. You can install trim before you do the veneer or afterwards. Doing it before veneering leaves the least evidence of a glue line between the veneer and the trim (assuming that the two are a good color and grain match). Glue the trim on the cabinet and veneer over it. When you cut the front bevel you'll cut thru the veneer along with the trim - nice job...... You can also install the trim afterwards. If you choose this way, cut the trim about 1/32" wider than the cabinet is thick and when glueing it on, leave the overhang sticking out on the veneer/outer side of the cabinet. Cut your 30 degree bevel and then sand the trim flush with the veneered surface. I've done it both ways and both are OK. Attention to detail is more important. JBL only glued on their trim - no dowel pins, no splines, etc. Good glue and well clamped and it WILL NOT fall off. All veneer that I have used comes finish sanded. After installation I lightly sand with 120 grit, then 220 grit and if applying an oil finish I further sand with 320 grit......Finish type depends on the type of wood used - in my opinion. Walnut has to be oiled. It's against the law to spray laquer or polyeurethane over walnut. You might as well paint it black. Rosewood, Teak and other exotics do well with oil too, as long as they're tight grained. Red and White Oak and other more open grain woods look nicer with a sprayed finish. There's all kinds of options. I have a spray gun and shoot laquer quite a bit. For the guys who don't have that ability, consider buying spray cans of satin polyeurethane from Home Depot/Menards. Several (4-6) coats out of a spray can, steel wooled in between, will yield real nice results. Poly will be more resistant to water rings should you be forced to allow your wife to put a plant on top of your precious speaker cabinet !!!!!!!!! Found one of our cats sitting on top of one of my Model 19's this morning - sent his butt flying. That's all I know - Would be glad to help with anything that I have overlooked here. Rick

saeman
05-17-2005, 10:19 AM
Have started doing the second cabinet and have cut out all the back cabinet edges. Here's a couple of pics showing the new wood installed around the back edges of the cabinet. It's baltic birch to match the material used for the cabinet sides, top and bottom. Front to back edges are good and will not be cut out. If they were, I would replace them with oak as it's hard and provides a solid edge, and it won't show when the new veneer is installed. Hopefully this will answer a previous question about how new edge material can be installed. This is a much better option than trying to fill in problem areas with plastic wood. Rick http://audioheritage.org/vbulletin/images/smilies/bouncy.gif

Audiokarma
05-17-2005, 05:26 PM
Wow, this project must give you a tremendous sense of satisfaction and accomplishment. Very nice. Cant' wait to see the finished product. :applaud:

boputnam
05-17-2005, 06:13 PM
Those are absolutely beautiful!!!

Man, I gotta beg your indulgence - pretty please?

Could you start a Thread under "General" as 4350 Monitor Plans...?

Just like this one on the 4345: 4345 Monitor Plans (http://audioheritage.csdco.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=314&highlight=4345+plans)

The chance to document and archive that cabinet construction and dimensions is so very invaluable!!

saeman
05-17-2005, 07:18 PM
Guys: Thanx for the compliments. Woodworking (mostly cabinet making) has been almost a life long hobby for me. It fits in well with my audio sickness. I've worked most of my life in hi-stress jobs or have been in business for myself (high stress to the MAX) and disappearing into my wood world takes me away from all that crap. It winds me down and takes me away from the tensions we all have to live with. My wife indulges me with never a complaint. Hell, I could be sitting in the bars every night drownding my woes in long neck bottles of Bud. The new thread is a good idea. I'll put one up. Here's a thought - I have been thru the 4350 cabinets (and others) with a fine tooth comb and have made sketches of every internal detail (three pairs that I can think of) and have every thing in spiral notebooks. If there is someone in the forum who is AutoCad savy, all of this stuff could be put into very nice form, from scans of the pages I have. Lets see if there is someone out there. I have under construction, a scratch built pair of 4350's right now. I put the project on the back burner for a short while so I could restore Rosie and her sister. I'll start up again soon and all of that info could be posted in a new thread. John P. from Winnapeg visited me last week and got a chance to see the scratch build project and it hopefully gave him some ideas. I know that the 4350 is not everyones cup of tea but there is certainly a big cult of followers for that model, myself included. The 4350 is actually an easy model to build for anyone interested. Don't let the size fool you. With a little patience the parts are available too. All you need is some floor space for them. A real fool could actually stack them and have two pairs. In a recent thread someone mentioned the large number that are in Japan. That's very true and there may be more pairs there than in the U.S. Give me your thoughts. Rick

boputnam
05-17-2005, 07:34 PM
If there is someone in the forum who is AutoCad savy, all of this stuff could be put into very nice form, from scans of the pages I have. Lets see if there is someone out there. Hey, Rick...

I can think of two forumites offhand - let's see if they pitch-up here. :hmm:

4313B
05-17-2005, 07:48 PM
I've been using AutoCAD since Release 10 first came out (just got AutoCAD 2005) but don't have the time right now.
You provide all the dimensions and we'll see who draws it up.

That's what this repository is for - http://audioheritage.org/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=3166
So far no one has drawn up anything from it but maybe a 4350 will pique some interest.

saeman
05-17-2005, 07:53 PM
Giskard: Thanx for the info. I now know that the info repository exists. In my travels on the forum I had yet to stumble across it. Will slowly but surely get my notes scanned and park them there. Rick

4313B
05-17-2005, 07:59 PM
The repository is a sticky and always stays at the top of that forum.

Go ahead and do it in your newly created thread instead. Hopefully everyone will stay out of it until you're finished. :p

Thanks! :yes:

John
05-17-2005, 11:27 PM
Hi Rick I have to thank you for filling in some of the blanks in my 4350 project. Your help and tips will really make these 4350 clones come as close as factory cabinets to the point of being the real deal!!! :applaud:

saeman
05-20-2005, 06:42 PM
Got the woofs back from recone so I put all of the components in the cabinet. This is as done as I'll get till I make grills. A couple of guys asked what Rosie looked like before the overhaul. From these pics you'll be able to tell the difference. She could sing, man could she sing - but I just couldn't stand looking at her. She's worlds better now. http://audioheritage.org/vbulletin/images/smilies/biggrin.gif

mech986
05-20-2005, 07:02 PM
First 2 pictures - :applaud: :yes:

Last picture (the before pic?) :biting: :shock: :wtf: :screwy:
:jawdrop: :eek: :help: :uhmmmm:


Uh, yeah. Great job on the restoration. I'm glad you're putting new grilles on that rack!!

Regards,

Bart

saeman
05-20-2005, 08:26 PM
The pic of Rosie was just a pulse check to see if you guys are actually awake while cruising the forum. She's actually Miss May (her name is Rosie) from the 2005 Krispy Kreme Doughnuts Lingerie Calendar. Makes you want to eat doughnuts while listening to your favorite JBL's. I have a bad habit of naming some of my favorite audio gear. Have a real rare black face SAE Mark IIICM Power Amp and her name is Ole Black Betty. "Simple Strokes For Simple Folks".

http://audioheritage.org/vbulletin/images/smilies/wink.gif

Charlie4350
05-20-2005, 10:29 PM
Those 4350's are pretty. Funny, I've been looking at the pics for 10 minutes with a pair sitting behind me. Been loving my pair for over 25 years now. Quite the pool of talent around this site, and I much admire your work. I'm also enjoying the thread, 4350 monitor plans, very thorough - and way out of my league. Chuck

yggdrasil
05-21-2005, 03:41 AM
That's really impressing Rick. :applaud: :jawdrop:


Way to go.

pmakres1
05-21-2005, 08:29 AM
Those 4350's are well beyond nice. Truly beautiful!

Congratulations!

Peter

saeman
09-06-2005, 12:46 PM
Finally got Rosie and her sister together for a couple of pics. They're still naked but the blue grille cloth from Zilch should arrive today and will hopefully get some clothes on this pair. This was a restoration of a poorly cared for pair of classic monitors and the results exceeded my expectations. Since these will eventually go to a new home, I'll have to find another project to do in rosewood. It is truely beautiful wood and I need something around to remind me.

Rick http://audioheritage.org/vbulletin/images/smilies/bouncy.gif

Titanium Dome
09-06-2005, 01:02 PM
What a wall of sound that'll make in someone's family room. You really did a good job.

I don't know how you can let them go.

Regis
09-06-2005, 01:20 PM
Very nice job on 'the ladies'! Had to get a chuckle out of the swimsuit pic! As rowdy as my (scrawny) L-300's are, I just have the toughest time imagining a pair of those things in my house. I'd bet it'd be awesome, but it'd be tough to lift the couch back up after it's knocked over on it's back.:p

mech986
09-06-2005, 01:26 PM
Absolutely FABULOUS :applaud: :applaud:


Regards,

Bart

saeman
09-06-2005, 01:40 PM
Very nice job on 'the ladies'! Had to get a chuckle out of the swimsuit pic! As rowdy as my (scrawny) L-300's are, I just have the toughest time imagining a pair of those things in my house. I'd bet it'd be awesome, but it'd be tough to lift the couch back up after it's knocked over on it's back.:p

Hello Regis: Nothing scrawny about L300's - let my pair go about a year ago knowing that I can't keep everything. I bought these 4350B's on top of the pair of 4350's I already had, coz I wanted to restore them, and knowing they would have to eventually go. Right now I basically have 3 pairs of the big ones in the family room with room for only one pair (maybe two if I plead insanity). My wife is only silent coz she knows that some will go out the door (soon she hopes). Thanx for the kind words - Rick

saeman
09-06-2005, 01:49 PM
Regis - Speaking of L300's - I see that you are in Palmdale and my pair shipped to LAX to a friend of mine in Palmdale who got them for a friend ??????? How long have you had them??? Rick

Regis
09-06-2005, 02:13 PM
Regis - Speaking of L300's - I see that you are in Palmdale and my pair shipped to LAX to a friend of mine in Palmdale who got them for a friend ??????? How long have you had them??? Rick

I think I got them earlier this year, about late spring or early summer from a musician in San Diego (within 20 miles of where I scored my big Sansui and the 250 Ti's). The LE14H-1's are out for refoam and should be getting them back soon. You're right, the L-300's aren't scrawny, but maybe in comparison to the 4350/4355's, they're certainly smaller! Regarding the 4350/4355, I noticed that there's a couple of blank spots for an extra horn and tweeter on each cab. Have you ever seen that utilized for an extra pair and is the crossover set up for that?

Datubie
09-06-2005, 11:59 PM
First dibs on them??!!:D

Zilch
09-07-2005, 12:42 AM
Regarding the 4350/4355, I noticed that there's a couple of blank spots for an extra horn and tweeter on each cab. Have you ever seen that utilized for an extra pair and is the crossover set up for that?Whenever there are multiple drivers playing the same signal in those frequency ranges, there is phase interference. Big trouble....

John
09-07-2005, 12:45 AM
The blocked off holes for the 2405 +2440 is for spreading out the dispersion or tightning it up by changing the position of drivers without having to resort to flipping the cabinets left to right:D Trust me once these cabinets are in place you do not want to move them;)

Regis
09-07-2005, 06:50 AM
Thanks Zilch and John for the info. That's what makes this board great. I was always curious and now I know.:D

Alex Lancaster
09-07-2005, 09:04 AM
:) The xover is not designed to drive 2 2405's and 2440's per side, a lot of strange things would happen, You could burn em up also; Anyway they are more than loud enough.

saeman
11-08-2005, 11:05 AM
I've finally brought the restoration project of Big Rosie and her sister to a close. I've been done for a while with the exception of building and covering the grilles. "Tip Of The Day" - when choosing your grille material - don't choose cheese cloth, don't choose terry cloth and don't choose crocus cloth - Choose Zilch Cloth. The blue cloth that Zilch is supplying is awesome. The results were surprising and although I have original grilles of varying shades of blue, this cloth is right on the money. My 4350B's now have clothes on and a new look. On to another project. Here's a few pics of the end result.

Rick http://audioheritage.org/vbulletin/images/smilies/smile.gif

saeman
11-08-2005, 11:06 AM
pics

boputnam
11-08-2005, 11:06 AM
:banana: :dancin: :cheers: :rockon2: :smsex:

Man-oh-man!

saeman
11-08-2005, 11:07 AM
Pics

boputnam
11-08-2005, 11:08 AM
Golly gee.... I remember when you started this, and didn't have anything but a crummy old Polaroid for you avatar!

Remind us what you're driving these with...?

Lancer
11-08-2005, 11:09 AM
I was wondering where you went.

Nice!

Who ended up doing all your networks?

boputnam
11-08-2005, 11:10 AM
"Tip Of The Day" Give us another one - discuss glueing the cloth to the grill frames... Those corners look excellent - no bunching front or back...

Ken Pachkowsky
11-08-2005, 11:11 AM
Now that is first class stunning work. My hats off to you. The best restoration job I have ever seen.

Take a bow sir.

:applaud: :applaud: :applaud:

Ken

saeman
11-08-2005, 11:16 AM
Bo: I've recently chatted with Zilch on the subject of installing the cloth. I hope to soon post a few words on my method - minus all the 4 letter words I used working up to the best way I found to do it. My first pair completed were for 4343's and the results were excellent from the front, poor from the back. Then did two sets of 4350 grilles (8 pieces) and I think I now have it down pat. More later - Rick

saeman
11-08-2005, 11:25 AM
Hello Lancer - I'm still here but have been side tracked with work (a necessary evil) and trying to finish my family room so that I can listen to some of the stuff I have been building. Will never get the wife to accept a pair of 4350's in the bedroom. Nobody has built any x-overs for me - I'm still hoping you will take on the task. Last time we discussed the subject we were looking at a charge coupled version for my 4351's (quasi 4355 ) and you were going to do some additional design work and guinny pig me with your results. I'm still game and I do apologize for this period of silence. I figured we'de eventually get the project off the ground when you were ready. I'll send you an email and hopefully we can continue on. I do need (as I remember) to get you the bolt hole patern for the 3107 as they will need to fit in place of the factory 3107's currently in the cabs. Thanx - Rick




I was wondering where you went.

Nice!

Who ended up doing all your networks?

Titanium Dome
11-08-2005, 11:40 AM
Really nice. Can't wait for the cover cloth instructions. :yes:

Robh3606
11-08-2005, 12:02 PM
My those do look great!!!

Rob:applaud:

Regis
11-08-2005, 12:20 PM
Wo-oow! Those are be-youtiful speakers. The rosewood veneer looks absolutely superb! They came out very nicely. The grills give them a muscular look that's for damn sure. The total anti-thesis to the now popular 'wifestyle' music systems they sell now. Nosiree, this is a 'sit-down-shut-up-and-hope-you-don't-mind-getting-your-hair-messed-up' kinda system! Thanks for sharing the excellent results. Did you feel like a proud papa when you were done?:D

Mr. Widget
11-08-2005, 01:20 PM
My those do look great!!!

Rob:applaud:

Ditto! Well done!!


Widget

yggdrasil
11-08-2005, 01:58 PM
Fantastic. Congratulations.




Will never get the wife to accept a pair of 4350's in the bedroom.

:yes: they are difficult.....

saeman
11-08-2005, 05:41 PM
Hello Johnny: Thanx for your comments - BTW - Your avitar reminds me to comment on your Sovereign Restoration. Looks like they came out real nice. The speckle/splatter in the finish looks very accurate. What did you use as a tint for your laquer? Sometime, when I find some time, I have a pair of Sov II's I want to refinish and I hope that I can get them to match my big Sov's and my C68 Equipment cabinet which are original finish. It will surely be a tremendous task to achieve a close color match; most likely a lot of trial and error. Let's compare notes. Rick




Fantastic. Congratulations.





:yes: they are difficult.....

speakerdave
11-08-2005, 05:52 PM
The speakers are all really quite nice, Rick. Good work.

yggdrasil
11-09-2005, 01:09 AM
What did you use as a tint for your laquer?
My dictionary says I used stain. Since it is normally used directly on the wood it is very thin and adds just a little color each layer when mixed into the laquer. I used a combination of ivory(black) and chestnut (glow). I lost count, but it was probably 12-15 layers before I was satisfied with the color.

I also used polyeurethane laquer, since it gives a stronger and nicer finish than the eurethane lacquer.

mbottz
11-09-2005, 05:16 PM
Those look AWESOME!!!


I am sure Rosie does not get out much, but if she is ever in Texas, she can bunk at my place for as long as she wants!!!. ;)


Well Done

Mb

majick47
11-09-2005, 05:47 PM
Riessen congrats to you on a stunning makeover of Rosie. Looking forward to hearing how you installed Zilchs JBL blue grill cloth, I have a pair of L300 grills that I want to change to JBL blue.

saeman
12-13-2005, 12:16 PM
Yes - The rumors are true!! Rosie and her sister have left for a new home. It was tough to see them go but the decision was made before I started the restoration. They started out as a very poorly cared for and butchered pair and I really enjoyed bringing them back to new. The visual appeal of the rosewood on the big cabinets exceeded my expectations and it was a hard decision. I truely believe that a man should be able to keep all the vintage JBL that he can get his hands on, and believe me "I have tried", but 3 pairs of 4350's is too much and even I have to be honest. I did hear of a man in Dallas who had six operating pairs of 4350's in his home and a spare pair to go with them. This guy obviously has way too much money and NO WIFE. I do solemly swear that I will never be 4350-less. As a reminder I'm currently doing my 4344 project in Rosewood. Stay tuned - I'm soon to start restoring another pair of 4350's and although I'm tempted to do rosewood again, I've located some highly figured, high quality walnut veneer and will go that way. Thanks to you all for your compliments on a fun project. Rick

Audiobeer
12-13-2005, 12:48 PM
That was a tremendously enjoyable thread to read! Thanks Riessen