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tjm001
11-29-2015, 09:44 AM
What is the current best or most practical material to use inside ported and roughly 5 cubic foot speaker enclosures for sound absorbance? In the past I know fiberglass insulation was popular and that's what I used before. But it is also messy and itchy. What is the most current and modern way to handle this? Or is it still the same old messy fiberglass way? Thanks.

Tom

NickH
11-29-2015, 10:56 AM
I like rock wool. No itch.

tjm001
11-29-2015, 11:50 AM
I like rock wool. No itch.

In what shape or form? Who is supplier? Thanks.

Tom

NickH
11-29-2015, 12:06 PM
Well I kinda cheat and buy it from Lowe's. Its used up north in place of fiberglass batting. Its also used as fire blocking too, lol.

Down here in Texas I have to special order it but one bag lasts me a long time. Its pretty dense so I try and fluffy it when I use it. But I've also used it as is in sealed cabinets without issue.


its much darker in color then fiberglass. Almost a bark mustard color. Its called roxul.

tjm001
11-29-2015, 12:11 PM
Well I kinda cheat and buy it from Lowe's. Its used up north in place of fiberglass batting. Its also used as fire blocking too, lol.

Down here in Texas I have to special order it but one bag lasts me a long time. Its pretty dense so I try and fluffy it when I use it. But I've also used it as is in sealed cabinets without issue.


its much darker in color then fiberglass. Almost a bark mustard color. Its called roxul.

My boxes are not sealed as they are ported. So it does not seem to fit my application, but I'll check it out. Thanks.

I was wondering if anyone has used the foam stuff that Parts Express sells for sound absorbing??

Tom

DS-21
11-29-2015, 12:17 PM
What is the current best or most practical material to use inside ported and roughly 5 cubic foot speaker enclosures for sound absorbance? In the past I know fiberglass insulation was popular and that's what I used before. But it is also messy and itchy. What is the most current and modern way to handle this? Or is it still the same old messy fiberglass way? Thanks.

Tom

Recycled denim insulation (e.g. Bonded Logic Ultratouch, available online through Home Depot) is IMO the choice today. It works basically the same as fiberglass but is neither messy nor itchy.

Vahe Sahakian
11-29-2015, 12:52 PM
What is the current best or most practical material to use inside ported and roughly 5 cubic foot speaker enclosures for sound absorbance?


For my DIY 4350's with two 5 cubic foot woofer enclosures I used 1 1/2" thick semi rigid pink fiberglass insulation, these are not at all messy like batt insulation, they are easy to cut with xacto knife and can be directly glued to enclosure walls. These are available from commercial building suppliers, not Home Depot or Lowe's.

Vahe

tjm001
11-29-2015, 01:01 PM
For my DIY 4350's with two 5 cubic foot woofer enclosures I used 1 1/2" thick semi rigid pink fiberglass insulation, these are not at all messy like batt insulation, they are easy to cut with xacto knife and can be directly glued to enclosure walls. These are available from commercial building suppliers, not Home Depot or Lowe's.

Vahe

Thanks. This seems to fit my situation. I appreciate the input from all.

Tom

JuniorJBL
11-29-2015, 01:05 PM
Duct board works really well. HVAC supplier of your choice.

tjm001
11-29-2015, 06:13 PM
Recycled denim insulation (e.g. Bonded Logic Ultratouch, available online through Home Depot) is IMO the choice today. It works basically the same as fiberglass but is neither messy nor itchy.

This stuff really looks good! Thanks.

Tom

badman
11-30-2015, 01:24 PM
Ultratouch seconded. I like it a lot, and once upon a time saw some testing of the absorbtion v freq, it did as well as fiberglass if not better IIRC. The rigid fiberglass are a very decent solution though. Be careful to keep it to a lining, or at least don't overly obscure the vent.

NickH
11-30-2015, 02:08 PM
Hi tjm001,


Ya Rockwool would work in both sealed or vented cabinets. Just as other mentioned a little spray adhesive and stick it to the back. Rockwool is a bit more ridged then fiberglass so I think it works out better. Its a extremely good sound absorber. That actually what its used for in construction. Its used to sound proof walls.


But in all honesty all the products mentioned would do the job. You can also go buy a fabric store and buy polyfil too.


Nick

badman
11-30-2015, 02:53 PM
Hi tjm001,


Ya Rockwool would work in both sealed or vented cabinets. Just as other mentioned a little spray adhesive and stick it to the back. Rockwool is a bit more ridged then fiberglass so I think it works out better. Its a extremely good sound absorber. That actually what its used for in construction. Its used to sound proof walls.


But in all honesty all the products mentioned would do the job. You can also go buy a fabric store and buy polyfil too.


Nick

Of the options listed, ultratouch and fiberglass are heavily advantaged at low frequencies vs. rockwool (somewhat too dense ) or polyfill (not generally dense enough)

NickH
11-30-2015, 05:16 PM
Of the options listed, ultratouch and fiberglass are heavily advantaged at low frequencies vs. rockwool (somewhat too dense ) or polyfill (not generally dense enough)


If so then why do I see people alway suggest rockwool on this site? I'm not saying you wrong, just asking.

And I though I remember reading that jbl used mineral wool or rock wool in there cabinets. I know that denim stuff is sold as a sound absorber but fiber glass is not. Rock wool is. So I guess I'm asking if there is any technical papers that are available to read about this topic? I'm now acoustic engineer but I like data.


Nick