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View Full Version : What causes component failure; on-then-off-then on cycles?



robertbartsch
11-08-2013, 10:43 AM
....just wondering if frequent "on then off" cycles in electronics limits their life.... If you left an amp on 100% of the time would it last longer than one that is cycled a lot?

Mr. Widget
11-08-2013, 11:46 AM
....just wondering if frequent "on then off" cycles in electronics limits their life.... If you left an amp on 100% of the time would it last longer than one that is cycled a lot?This topic was discussed recently in another thread... not sure what search topic would locate it.

FWIW: Heat is the worst enemy of our electronics.


Widget

spkrman57
11-09-2013, 05:43 PM
Just like a incandescent light bulb on/off cycles are harder than long term use.

I don't leave my tube gear on all the time, but only use tubed gear for 4 hr or longer listening.

I have a "B" system w/SS gear for shorter listening with more on/off cycles.

Just my 2 cents worth or couse,

Regards, Ron

robertbartsch
11-10-2013, 06:06 AM
I connected my Denon receiver up to my TV a few months ago and it is on about 95% of the time. The 5-channel receiver is 14 years old. It crapped out after I owned it for only 3 months and it was repaired under the Denon warranty.

I'm wondering how long it might last with its current duty. Before it was connected to the TV, it was sitting in the back room and was almost never used for the first 13 years of its life.

I was thinking many hot/cool, hot/cool cycles would be a bad thing but I have no reference or research either way.

Thanks....

Allanvh5150
11-10-2013, 11:00 AM
Many failures I deal with are caused by electrolytic capacitor failure. The shelf life of these are anything
from 5 years to a lifetime but they can also fail in far less than 5 years. It really makes no difference if
the appliance is powered on 24/7 or cycled every hour. Many electro caps can leak onto adjacent parts
causing them to fail or, in the case of filter caps, can fail in spectacular fashion.

Allan.