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HemiMoparGuy198
01-14-2010, 05:07 PM
Hey All,

May seem like a kinda stupid question, but I was wondering if there was a way to tell for sure that you're not driving too much power to the speaker. Obviously to keep an amp from clipping you'd want an amp that is rated higher power than your speakers handle...However, I've never had an amp that is more powerful than the speakers. And I have heard, I dunno how true it is, but it seems clausible, that you want to run an amp at about 3/4 power...or at least more than 1/2. But is there a way to tell that you are at the speakers max (or close to it)...I mean, BEFORE the smoke comes rolling out of them? Or do you just have to pretty much guess at it and hope you don't go over??

rlsound
01-14-2010, 09:57 PM
amp with an output of 300-400 watts should be good for those speakers. These biamped? or are you using the 3115 network?

If you are hurting something, you will hear it first.

HemiMoparGuy198
01-15-2010, 07:14 AM
I have the 3115 crossover. And I was looking into the Crown XLS 602 which is about 400 wpc @8 ohms. And the speakers rated at 300 watts each. So I have 100 too many watts and want to make sure I'm not going to blow the speakers. So what you're saying is I will hear major distortion soon enough before they smoke to get it turned back down so I don't have replacing to do??

Eaulive
01-15-2010, 08:27 AM
Power compression is audible, when the coils and magnets become too hot. Also over-excusion of a woofer cone causing non linear response is audible, and I'm not talking about the VC hitting the back plate, way before this ;)

An overdriven speaker is not as obvious to hear as a clipped amplifier, but if you know your speakers and know the way they sound and you have a fairly good hearing this shouldn't be a problem. Something will feel wrong and you'll know.
Also the SPL may become annoying before any damage can occur, unless you're one of these people who don't feel happy before having 120dB in their favorite living room chair :screwy:

HemiMoparGuy198
01-15-2010, 11:03 AM
unless you're one of these people who don't feel happy before having 120dB in their favorite living room chair :screwy:

Well, not exactly, but if I want to listen to music or a movie...from another room across the house...I may want to crank it, and want to make sure I'm not gonna cause any expensive damage...thanks for the info

Eaulive
01-15-2010, 11:40 AM
Well, not exactly, but if I want to listen to music or a movie...from another room across the house...I may want to crank it, and want to make sure I'm not gonna cause any expensive damage...thanks for the info

I think you'll be fine, an overdriven speaker is noticeable when you listen properly. Of course if you let your system unnatended in the hands of careless non-audiophile people, you may have a disaster.

HemiMoparGuy198
01-15-2010, 02:20 PM
I think you'll be fine, an overdriven speaker is noticeable when you listen properly. Of course if you let your system unnatended in the hands of careless non-audiophile people, you may have a disaster.

Well, no problem there, the ol' lady is afraid to touch it (told how much it'd cost to replace) and no kids...yet. Thanks for the input