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Krunchy
07-15-2009, 07:06 PM
Hi Guys & Gals, I know there are quite a few jazz fans here in this forum & I was wondering if you could share some of your favorite guitarists of the genre, new & old. :) :applaud:

Based on the title of this thread it is only fitting that I start it with the man himself & the following offerings (Impressions, probably my favorite song of his I love the version on Smokin' at the Half Note).... Dig!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fXvdU7f-q7I
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51PpkQq3eIL._SS500_.jpg
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/517E4W22S9L._SS500_.jpg

Krunchy
07-15-2009, 07:11 PM
I also like Kenny Burrell & Grant Green, though not familiar w/Mr Kessel this video is quite impressive. I found this while trying to find some clips of Gran Green but there does not appear to be too many of them (& thats an understatement!);)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AKW40...eature=related (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AKW40qCeql8&feature=related)

Steve Mac
07-16-2009, 08:06 AM
The best CD recording of Wes' is the "Goin' Out of My Head" remaster...listen to that on a decent stereo...it's just amazing. I just picked up "A Night at the Vanguard" with the Kenny Burrell Trio...cool as h e l l. I listened to a lot of Charlie Christian, Grant Green, Tal Farlow, Jim Hall, Barney Kessel, Howard Roberts, Kenny Burrell, George Benson and Johnny Smith growing up...but mostly it was Wes.

Krunchy
07-16-2009, 08:27 AM
Thanks for the suggestions Steve, sounds like you got a well rounded foundation there ;)

Joe Pass anybody, I have a couple of cds by him, I've had a hard time finding something of his that I can really sink my teeth into.
His Duets cd with John Pisano is one of my favorites by not his typical ensemble I would guess? can anyone chime in with some suggestion on this giant of the guitar.

jcrobso
07-16-2009, 08:31 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VoRq1JAwHJg&feature=related

loach71
07-16-2009, 09:00 AM
.

toobwacky
07-16-2009, 12:58 PM
One of my all time favorite albums:

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_kAE1IjiQfE0/SO9JGbwFNZI/AAAAAAAADHA/dUrGqGlgS_E/s320/2.jpg

Ken Pachkowsky
07-17-2009, 08:40 AM
One of my all time favorite albums:



Oh yes, he sure can play. I have seen him live with Chris Botti.

louped garouv
07-17-2009, 09:49 AM
Joe Pass anybody, I have a couple of cds by him, I've had a hard time finding something of his that I can really sink my teeth into.

not a direct JP recommendation, but i know that Steve Masakowski has been quoted saying he was heavily influneced by Joe Pass... I think there may even be a tribute album, "for joe" or something...

http://userserve-ak.last.fm/serve/252/540833.jpg

found the tribute album info...

The resulting album, For Joe, includes a mixture of originals and standards recorded in a trio setting, featuring Bill Huntington on bass and Astral Project bandmate Johnny Vidacovich on drums. The sparse setting allows or Masakowski's seven string guitar and formidable technique to shine as he pays homage to Pass on tunes like Falling in Love With Love, Pass Presence and For Django, the title track of Pass' 1964 album.

herki the cat
07-23-2009, 02:22 AM
ZREMEN
One of my all time favorite albums:

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_kAE1IjiQfE0/SO9JGbwFNZI/AAAAAAAADHA/dUrGqGlgS_E/s320/2.jpg
__________________________________________________ ___________

That MIcrophone is An RCA "Model 44-A" Ribbon Microphone used exclisively by NBC, many Radio Stations, Recording Studios & Hollywood Studios Starting in 1930, and it is still the most beautiful "True -To- Life -Smooth"- Sounding Microphone ever in the industry. The classic new "44-BX " You-Are -There" Sounding Ribbon Microphone yields 6-db more sensitivity than 44-A. Both are very highly prized in the recording industry.
---------------------------------------
Cheers......herki the cat

laurie
07-23-2009, 05:19 AM
I've seen many great guitarists over the years here in London including John Scofield many times, John Abercrombie, Pat Metheny, Mike Stern. Unfortunately I've never seen George Benson, would love to have seen him.

These are some of my favourite guitar albums

John Scofield - Loud Jazz, Stillwarm, Electric outlet, This meets That, Out like a light, Shinola

Mike Stern - Time in place, Odds or evens

Emily Remler - Transitions, Catwalk

Steve Khan - Arrows

George Benson - Bad Benson

Melvin Sparks - Sparks, Akilah

Scott Henderson & Tribal Tech - Spears, Dr Hee

Carl Verheyen - Slang justice

Pat Metheny - American garage

Brad Buethe - Sidestep

Krunchy
07-23-2009, 06:22 AM
Thank you for the suggestions guys! :)
some of the names I have heard of, some are quite new to me but I look forward to sampling some fo their material. :applaud:

Louped, I just found a copy of For Joe for $1.15, & after listening to the samples on amazon how can I not pull the trigger?! :D Thanks!

Mr. Loach, that Lenny is one bad ass on the guit, good stuff! ;)

Hello Steve Mac & thanks fot the tip on those two albums. For me at least, the problem with some of these giants is that they have soo much material that its easy to get dissoriented, hence this thread, much appreciated!

Hello Toobwacky, I knew of Mark but never heard any of his recordings, I had a chance to sample this particular recording & thats right up my alley, very nice! Thank you!

Hello herki the cat & Laurie, welcome to the forum!:)

Hoerninger
07-23-2009, 07:37 AM
I've seen many great guitarists over the years here in London including John Scofield many times, ...

First I read Matt Schofield (from Manchester), he is worth to listen to.

Look at YouTube and
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matt_Schofield
"Matt Schofield (born 21 August (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/August_21) 1977 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1977))[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matt_Schofield#cite_note-0) is a UK (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kingdom) blues (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blues) guitarist (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guitarist) and singer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singer) whose music (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music) blends blues (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blues) with rock (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rock_%28music%29) and funky (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Funk) jazz (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jazz) rhythms. His band, The Matt Schofield Trio, play their own material, which is a blend of blues, funk and jazz, along with covers (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cover_version) of blues classics"
___________
Peter

louped garouv
07-23-2009, 08:19 AM
Thank you for the suggestions guys! :)
some of the names I have heard of, some are quite new to me but I look forward to sampling some fo their material. :applaud:

Louped, I just found a copy of For Joe for $1.15, & after listening to the samples on amazon how can I not pull the trigger?! :D Thanks!



no worries, he's been on my list for quite awhile...

it's nice to share!

i dig the 'astral project' he's been involved with also....
http://www.astralproject.com/old/
(the other players are no slouches either!)

certainly not traditional jazz though....
;)

but i'm OK with that....

rdgrimes
07-23-2009, 08:20 AM
No discussion of current guitar virtuosity should leave out Frank Vignola. He has a number of CDs and DVDs out now. One of the most amazing is a DVD:
Bucky Pizzarelli - Favorite Solos featuring Frank Vignola. Bucky is no slouch either.

Joe Pass is the master, but Herb Ellis shouldn't be forgotten. Pass and Ellis were about the only 2 guitarists who could keep up with Oscar Peterson.

An amazing recording that should be part of any collection is "Skoll - Petterson - Grappelli - Pass" Available on CD and SACD. There you can hear Pass keeping up with 2 of the finest in the world.

rdgrimes
07-23-2009, 09:28 AM
Herb Ellis / Joe Pass "Seven, Come Eleven"

Available on CD, SACD and even LP.

toobwacky
07-23-2009, 12:24 PM
ZREMEN
__________________________________________________ ___________

That MIcrophone is An RCA "Model 44-A" Ribbon Microphone used exclisively by NBC, many Radio Stations, Recording Studios & Hollywood Studios Starting in 1930, and it is still the most beautiful "True -To- Life -Smooth"- Sounding Microphone ever in the industry. The classic new "44-BX " You-Are -There" Sounding Ribbon Microphone yields 6-db more sensitivity than 44-A. Both are very highly prized in the recording industry.
---------------------------------------
Cheers......herki the cat

That's some interesting technical information that I was completely oblivious to. Although it's obvious from listening to the True Blue CD that sound quality is important to Whitfield.

Got any interesting tid-bits about the guitar?

Thanks herki the cat!!!!!

toobwacky
07-23-2009, 12:40 PM
These are some of my favourite guitar albums

John Scofield - Loud Jazz, Stillwarm, Electric outlet, This meets That, Out like a light, Shinola

...

I'm a BIG Scofield fan too. My favorite albums are Hand Jive (another of my all-time favorite albums)
http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/ciu/a2/5f/87c69833e7a0820112290110.L.jpg
and Uberjam
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51YS46SJ0TL._SS500_.jpg
which is just incredibly innovative. Weird at times, but it's a thrill to hear an album where the artist has such an original vision and both the artistic virtuousity and technical prowess to pull it off.

JSF13
07-23-2009, 02:01 PM
The best CD recording of Wes' is the "Goin' Out of My Head" remaster...listen to that on a decent stereo...it's just amazing. I just picked up "A Night at the Vanguard" with the Kenny Burrell Trio...cool as h e l l. I listened to a lot of Charlie Christian, Grant Green, Tal Farlow, Jim Hall, Barney Kessel, Howard Roberts, Kenny Burrell, George Benson and Johnny Smith growing up...but mostly it was Wes.

Sounds a lot like my education.:)

Here's another vote for Jim Hall.:applaud:

Here's a little track with Chet Baker,Ron Carter and Steve Gadd.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oLO7BlH8l20&feature=related

laurie
07-23-2009, 03:25 PM
First I read Matt Schofield (from Manchester), he is worth to listen to.

Look at YouTube and
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matt_Schofield
"Matt Schofield (born 21 August (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/August_21) 1977 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1977))[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matt_Schofield#cite_note-0) is a UK (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kingdom) blues (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blues) guitarist (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guitarist) and singer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singer) whose music (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music) blends blues (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blues) with rock (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rock_%28music%29) and funky (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Funk) jazz (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jazz) rhythms. His band, The Matt Schofield Trio, play their own material, which is a blend of blues, funk and jazz, along with covers (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cover_version) of blues classics"
___________
Peter

I've never heard of matt Schofield - thanks for the suggestion, I'll have to look out for him.

laurie
07-23-2009, 03:29 PM
I'm a BIG Scofield fan too. My favorite albums are Hand Jive (another of my all-time favorite albums)
http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/ciu/a2/5f/87c69833e7a0820112290110.L.jpg
and Uberjam
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51YS46SJ0TL._SS500_.jpg
which is just incredibly innovative. Weird at times, but it's a thrill to hear an album where the artist has such an original vision and both the artistic virtuousity and technical prowess to pull it off.

Toobwacky, the amazing thing about John is that he always stays innovative - his music never seems to get stale, he always sounds fresh even after 3 decades, he has a great gift of combining harmonies, melodies with off centre beats and riffs.

And he's played so many styles of jazz including blues, funk, gospel influence, fusion, ECM type chamber jazz, straight ahead - amazing musician.

Plus he did the Ray Charles tribute in 2005 with singers like Dr John.

rdgrimes
07-23-2009, 03:48 PM
"Oscar Peterson Trio, Live at the Blue Note" With Herb Ellis, Ray Brown.
CD, Telarc.


"Johnny Frigo with Bucky and John Pizzarelli: Live from Studio A in NYC"
Hybrid SACD, Chesky


"Joe Pass Virtuoso"
Pablo, Hybrid SACD and CD, there are actually 3 or 4 separate CD releases with this title, numbered 2 3 and 4.

sba2
07-23-2009, 06:12 PM
This guy is interesting:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Django_Reinhardt


This guy is superb:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G%C3%A1bor_Szab%C3%B3

& was an inspiration for Carlos Santana

Ducatista47
07-23-2009, 08:29 PM
"Joe Pass Virtuoso"
Pablo, Hybrid SACD and CD, there are actually 3 or 4 separate CD releases with this title, numbered 2 3 and 4.

Virtuoso is very interesting to me. Pass had been through it all. Fame, the love of his peers, much recording, and a terrible battle with heroin. At this late stage he rethought his art and switched from full body F-hole electric to acoustic. He sounds like a beginner in a way, being new to the instrument, but he was so phenomenally talented and experienced that it is a unique experience to listen to these recordings. The music is the sweetest struggle I ever heard. I picture it like seeing Cezanne "struggling" with the creation of modern art through oil painting.


This guy is interesting:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Django_Reinhardt


"Interesting." That is funny. It is like saying the Sun is bright. Django is on every Jazz player's top five list, often #1. But I don't doubt that most Americans have never heard of him.

Here is another monster of guitar you might never have heard of. Baden Powell. All he was, according to Wiki, was " widely regarded as the greatest Brazilian guitarist of all times." If you like video, put this in your pipe and smoke it. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y0YooGnESSg
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qiv47G_aN4c&feature=related

He reminds me of Joe Pass here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g8tyya8HPQc&feature=related

Some are not feeble shadows of themselves at the end of their lives: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GWQ1boH70BM&feature=related

Good Luck finding it, but Samba Triste from 1989 is a good one. http://loronix.blogspot.com/2007/11/baden-powell-samba-triste-1989.html

His take on "Bahia" is a revelation of subtlety, beauty and power. But everything here is top notch.

Off topic (sorry, Krunchy!), but this is a hard act to follow. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CBMe9foIuR0&feature=related Some parts of the World have pop princesses much more talented than ours. Brazil gets her and we get Madonna and Mariah Carey. BTW, I'm in love... This next is such a cultural twister that the last minute had my brain circling the drain, but still in love. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TwRJT5E3cnE&feature=related Those chirping string harmonics are like her vocals. I thought Eddie Van Halen was a master at right hand techniques, but look at her. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=arYSseLXN4o&feature=related

Clark

sba2
07-25-2009, 06:45 PM
Clark,

I like your musical taste. I just finished watching the Baden Powell and Badi Assad videos. WOW! A big sigh here. That made my day.

Thanks again for the links.

Scott

Steve K
08-06-2009, 09:32 PM
Lee Ritenour Wesbound

midlife
08-07-2009, 12:54 PM
I had a Lee Ritenour lp, don't remember the title, but it was the one with "You Got Me Smilin" on it. Good lp. :applaud:

16hz lover
08-10-2009, 08:13 PM
You should not miss Vic Jurris- one of those real MONSTERS of jazz guitar who never had the fame to go with his talent. You can find his playing on some of the great Barry Miles LP's, like " Fusion Is "

Of course, you should obviously be aware of Al DeMiola:D

Doctor_Electron
09-02-2009, 04:35 AM
HOWARD ROBERTS !

http://www.utstat.utoronto.ca/mikevans/hroberts.html

whizzer
09-02-2009, 08:05 AM
.
Is this Denny's older brother from right here in Maine?

Ducatista47
01-29-2010, 11:52 PM
The good news: New York Stories Vol 1 is a terrific CD. As well as Gatton, there is Joshua Redman on tenor and Roy Hargrove on trumpet (and four other great musicians). "One For Lenny" is as good as any guitar performance I have ever heard, no kidding. It is so full yet fluid that the YouTube rendition http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BR0grs9joy0 reveals only perhaps half the notes I can hear through my Stax headphones. This man was obviously one of the best guitar players that ever lived. And he wasn't even a Jazz specialist. I can say that he had the speed, articulation and Jazz sense of Joe Pass, plus the all chops of a Pat Metheny and a first rate classical guitarist. And the ability to combine everything in the Jazz idiom.

The bad new? Firstly, Danny is dead, having killed himself. The word is that depression over poor record sales was a major cause. Secondly, good luck finding a high quality CD. Amazon burns it to recordable CD on demand. It seems to be out of print. It is a 1992 Blue Note release. Thirdly, as mentioned above, there is so much going on that a first class stereo is required to bring it all out.

Highly, highly recommended. Not many weak tracks on the record. My downloaded copy has ten songs for some reason. Nine are listed everywhere. This is not the soundtrack of the anthology movie, by the way.

Clark

SpeakerLabFan
01-31-2010, 01:58 PM
HOWARD ROBERTS !

http://www.utstat.utoronto.ca/mikevans/hroberts.html

:applaud: spun this one a couple of nights ago, very tasty jazz guitar.

The Howard Roberts Quartet - H.R. Is A Dirty Guitar Player
(1963, Capitol)

http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o240/speakerlabfan/records/roberts001.jpg

I really like John Scofield & Pat Metheny - I Can See Your House From Here. A couple of clips of them playing together. The second clip, Everybody's Party, is especially entertaining when they trade off solos:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aEMX64u7RNo&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3_pf_5vG2to&feature=related

Going to see Pat's new Orchestrion project in April when he stops in Seattle:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9VymAn8QJNQ&feature=player_embedded

cosmos
01-31-2010, 03:31 PM
I am flabbergasted. 3 pages of jazz guitarists and not a mention of Larry Carlton, Mr. 335? Google him and listen. Honored with a lifetime achievement award by Guitar Player Magazine. He is part of the jazz group Fourplay and was a guitarist on many of the Steely Dan albums and responsible for the guitar work in Kid Charlemagne. Take a look at this article in Guitar Player (http://www.guitarplayer.com/article/10-things-you/September-2009/100043) September 2009 issue...

Also, it appears to be missing Ken Navarro (http://www.kennavarro.com/)?

If you don't know the two above artists, you should...

Krunchy
01-31-2010, 07:44 PM
Well, I think Larry goes without saying ;) Thats like listing the Ox in the Great Bass Players thread :D
Now Kenny Navarro, him I was not aware of, thank you :)

Thanks for the suggestions Clark & SLF :applaud:

cosmos
01-31-2010, 09:23 PM
Stanley Jordan (http://www.stanleyjordan.com/) would also be on my list..

herki the cat
02-13-2011, 12:17 PM
ZREMEN
That Microphone is An RCA "Model 44-A" Ribbon Microphone used exclusively by NBC, many Radio Stations, Recording Studios & Hollywood Studios Starting in 1930, and it is still the most beautiful "True -To- Life -Smooth"- Sounding Microphone ever in the industry. The classic new "44-BX " You-Are -There" Sounding Ribbon Microphone yields 6-db more sensitivity than 44-A. Both are very highly prized in the recording industry: Herki the cat

Hello: toobwacky & ZREMAN__ Speaking of Radio Broadcasting, I acquired a First-Class Radio Telephone FCC Ticket in 1941__my junior year in high school__which led to a very nice transmitter engineering job combined with studio announcer duties at Radio KWEW in Hobbs, New Mexico.

We did not broadcast on Sundays. With the WW11 shortages, I became the only remaining engineer attending the Transmitter full time 7:00AM to 10:00PM. I Had tutors so I could finish my high school senior year.

Japan attacked Pearl Harbor in December. I remember the station manager had to retrieve me from a movie theater that Sunday afternoon to put the station on the air to break the tragic news.

At KWEW, we had a marvelous 16 inch, 33 rpm, high fidelity transcription music service library__with sound quality that rivals any current LP stereo recording. Alveno Rey had a number of these stunning 16 inch, 33rpm disc's featuring the "King Sisters" including a fabulous arrangement of "Tiger Rag" with the King Sisters voicing "Hold That Tiger!...Here Kitty!...Kitty! Kitty! Kitty!"...backed by the strains of Alveno Rey's Lap Steel Guitar__simply awesome! not to mention Alveno Rey's arrangement of "Rose Room!"

There's a nice article on Alveno Rey in the current on line version of Smithsonian magazine:

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/Alvino-Reys-Musical-Legacy.html# (http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/Alvino-Reys-Musical-Legacy.html)

Alveno Rey created the electric pickups. Rey's electric music technology was developed in part with innovator Leo Fender's amplifiers and as a consultant to the Gibson Guitar company__for both of whom, Rey tested many guitars. Rey was a brilliant engineer who in large part set the stage for swing music and modern rock.

Courtesy of Linn A Wheelright-Alveno Rey archive.

cheers: herki the cat

herki the cat
02-16-2011, 12:00 AM
There is a very fine article on Alveno Rey in the current on line version of Smithsonian magazine: :bouncy:

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/Alvino-Reys-Musical-Legacy.html# (http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/Alvino-Reys-Musical-Legacy.html)

Alveno Rey created the electric pickups. Rey's electric music technology was developed in part with innovator Leo Fender's amplifiers and as a consultant to the Gibson Guitar company, for both of whom, Rey tested many guitars.

Rey was a brilliant engineer who in large part set the stage for modern rock following the Swing Music Era__ for example, Rey's arrangement of "Rose Room" & the King Sisters voicing "Tiger Rag" aka: "Hold that Tiger!...Here Kitty!...Kitty! Kitty! Kitty!"

Courtesy of Linn A Wheelright-Alveno Rey archive.cheers: herki the cat

Ducatista47
04-17-2011, 05:03 PM
...Emily Remler. Neither had I. As good as anyone, she emulated Wes Montgomery early on, then developed her own style(s). She might have become as great as Joe Pass, but she didn't get the chance. In 1990 she perished at 32 of a heart attack probably brought on by a heroin overdose. Shit.

Lots on YouTube, right down to a local Public TV appearance. Played with Barbara Dennerlein, Astrud Gilberto, Larry Coryell and others. She was invited to gig with some of the true greats, including a dressing room session with Joe Pass (unrecorded dammit). I am ordering some of her CDs. Search and ye shall find.

Interestingly, she was good enough to be tapped by Arlen Roth (I think) for some Jazz & Latin instructional videos. They are still available on DVD. http://www.amazon.com/Emily-Remler-Bebop-Swing-Guitar/dp/B0014BJ12W

Clark

JeffW
04-17-2011, 05:07 PM
I picked up a nice album McLaughlin/Di Meola/De Luca "Passion Grace & Fire". Maybe more classical than jazz, but great picking.

Ducatista47
04-19-2011, 12:01 AM
I posted this on the Video thread but it certainly belongs here too.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jojChvdY1Wo&feature=related

This rendition is really sweet, outstanding in fact. While Barbara Dennierlein in ostensibly the leader, this is Emily Remler's number. Sonny Fortune does a great job on flute, Barbara is uncharacteristically using a bass player (she almost always played the bass with her left foot on the B3 pedalboard), everyone is right there...but it is Emily that makes this so great. She is playing a borrowed Gibson ES-125 thinline with a P-90 single coil pickup (my favorite), and it appears to be a 3/4 scale model. I guess she could have played a broomstick with a string if she had to. I just discovered her, but I am already coming to realize how good she was. A shame only musicians seem to remember her.

PS A further note to guitarists. I have an ES-125 full body, and I can tell you that the tiny thin guitar she is playing has almost no bass in the body. I am sure now it is a 3/4 because the pickup looks huge. It all goes to show that it is in the fingers, not the instrument. It seems she was the opposite of the carpenter who blames his tools. What a terrific player, working live through all the problems she was having with the smaller fretboard on the single note work. A another giveaway is her looking so much at the fretboard. She almost always played with her eyes closed.

Bern1
04-19-2011, 09:44 PM
incredible jazz guitar?

there are so many but the name Pat Martino comes to mind....an album anmed Cream....

Krunchy
04-20-2011, 03:55 AM
Nice stuff guys!
Was not aware of either of these artists, beautiful guitar.
Thank you so much :)

JeffW
04-20-2011, 06:38 AM
incredible jazz guitar?

there are so many but the name Pat Martino comes to mind....an album anmed Cream....

He's great, but even more so when you consider that he had to completely re-learn the guitar after a traumatic brain injury (I can't remember if it was a stroke or tumor or what) wiped his playing out at the peak of his career. An amazing comeback.

Ducatista47
04-20-2011, 11:35 AM
He's great, but even more so when you consider that he had to completely re-learn the guitar after a traumatic brain injury (I can't remember if it was a stroke or tumor or what) wiped his playing out at the peak of his career. An amazing comeback.
I seem to remember it was an aneurysm. The surgery, a very dangerous one, led to a full recovery (other than amnesia). I see now that according to Wikipedia he not only could not remember how to play, he had no memory of his career playing.

Only slightly less drastic, the great Leo Kottke suffered motor/nerve injury so severe he had to learn to play in a totally different manner.

yggdrasil
04-21-2011, 02:36 AM
Here's another one for you: Terje Rypdal - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dfLT_SCFaHg

Ducatista47
04-23-2011, 09:10 PM
I am listening to the Emily Remler CD I ordered, East To Wes. Hank Jones plays piano, and he alone is worth the modest price. Buster Williams is fantastic on the bass and Marvin Smith is fine on the drums. This is one of the best bands she ever went into the studio with. The CD is 1990 era but sounds good considering. Concord seemed to know what to do with digital back then.

This is way better than even I expected from the video work of Emily's I sampled on the web. In fact, it is an astonishing piece of work. One of the best Jazz guitar recordings I have ever heard. My lord, she was good. Clean, fast when the music called for it, and a very sweet player. Her musical ideas are a joy to hear. If you are familiar with the Jazz concept of needing to "tell a story," know that Emily could tell a story as well as anyone. She could play anything. While a bebop recording more than not, there is a lot of ground covered here. She did not end up being a clone of Wes Montgomery or anyone else. Someone should really do something about the fact that only musicians remember her.

East To Wes is such a pleasure to listen too. I am going to order another CD of Emily's, and I know I will not be disappointed. Now I am not only very sad that Emily died so young, I am pissed off about it. :mad: She did heroin and chain smoked, and sure enough she died of a heart attack. Didn't she have friends who could have helped her??? And yes, I know how difficult it is to save someone from them self, but come on.

Krunchy
04-25-2011, 07:54 AM
This is way better than even I expected from the video work of Emily's I sampled on the web. In fact, it is an astonishing piece of work. One of the best Jazz guitar recordings I have ever heard. My lord, she was good.
Someone should really do something about the fact that only musicians remember her.

East To Wes is such a pleasure to listen too. I am going to order another CD of Emily's, and I know I will not be disappointed. Now I am not only very sad that Emily died so young, I am pissed off about it. :mad: She did heroin and chain smoked, and sure enough she died of a heart attack. Didn't she have friends who could have helped her??? And yes, I know how difficult it is to save someone from them self, but come on.

Hi Clark!
You certainly piqued my curiosity about her with that video that you posted, I liked everything about her, not just her incredible playing but her laid back style, and she swings. I've got three of her cds tagged on amazon, unfortunately a lot of her material is out of print or to be had at ridiculously high prices, hopefully that will change in the near future. Tragic story to be sure, what a shame, always seems to happen to the good ones.
Looking forward to hearing her music :)

Ducatista47
04-26-2011, 12:15 AM
Well, Krunchy, I imagine East To Wes was probably her best work, but I too am exploring other recordings. I'll send you a report.

Since I have you set up for the kill ;), better sit down for this one. Same German TV concert with Barbara Dennerlien, Emily accompanying the singer Kim Parker. It is, most musicians know, more difficult to play with feeling slow than fast. Everyone can examine your performance through a microscope. It becomes quality over quantity.*

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YzSDPLyPpfI

How she could accompany that performance solo without the bass the usual Jazz guitar has, I will never know. She makes up for it with heart, I guess. And a ton of talent. Barbara must have respected Emily. The performance of My Latin Brother was the final selection of the concert. If you notice a few glitches, she was reported to be pretty high that night.

Talent does run in families; Kim Parker had two stepfathers. Charlie Parker and Phil Woods!

*To illustrate, here is a flashy exhibition by one of the greatest Jazz guitarist ever, George Benson. Great, but I like what Emily did better. Both done about the same time. I swear to God it sounds like George is being influenced by John McLaughlin here.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tn27IcAapPI

laurie
04-26-2011, 09:12 AM
Well, Krunchy, I imagine East To Wes was probably her best work, but I too am exploring other recordings. I'll send you a report.

Since I have you set up for the kill ;), better sit down for this one. Same German TV concert with Barbara Dennerlien, Emily accompanying the singer Kim Parker. It is, most musicians know, more difficult to play with feeling slow than fast. Everyone can examine your performance through a microscope. It becomes quality over quantity.*

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YzSDPLyPpfI

How she could accompany that performance solo without the bass the usual Jazz guitar has, I will never know. She makes up for it with heart, I guess. And a ton of talent. Barbara must have respected Emily. The performance of My Latin Brother was the final selection of the concert. If you notice a few glitches, she was reported to be pretty high that night.

Talent does run in families; Kim Parker had two stepfathers. Charlie Parker and Phil Woods!

*To illustrate, here is a flashy exhibition by one of the greatest Jazz guitarist ever, George Benson. Great, but I like what Emily did better. Both done about the same time. I swear to God it sounds like George is being influenced by John McLaughlin here.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tn27IcAapPI

I am also a big fan of Emily Remler. I've got Transitions, Catwalk and This is Me since the early 1990s. With This is Me, she was going in a new direction, I remember back in 1990 hearing of her death and being quite sad about it, I heard rumours of heroin but only saw that confirmed some years ago. She was a great player and composed beautifully too.

I've also got one of the tributes the guys did in 1990 shortly after her death. Its called Gathering and the CD has guys like Herb Ellis, Marvin Smitty Smith, Lincoln Goines, Eddie Gomez, Nelson Rangell and other people who performed with her. The other tribute CD has Leni Stern, Steve Bailey and others - maybe Jimmy Johnson who played bass on This is Me.

laurie
04-26-2011, 09:16 AM
I posted this on the Video thread but it certainly belongs here too.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jojChvdY1Wo&feature=related

This rendition is really sweet, outstanding in fact. While Barbara Dennierlein in ostensibly the leader, this is Emily Remler's number. Sonny Fortune does a great job on flute, Barbara is uncharacteristically using a bass player (she almost always played the bass with her left foot on the B3 pedalboard), everyone is right there...but it is Emily that makes this so great. She is playing a borrowed Gibson ES-125 thinline with a P-90 single coil pickup (my favorite), and it appears to be a 3/4 scale model. I guess she could have played a broomstick with a string if she had to. I just discovered her, but I am already coming to realize how good she was. A shame only musicians seem to remember her.

PS A further note to guitarists. I have an ES-125 full body, and I can tell you that the tiny thin guitar she is playing has almost no bass in the body. I am sure now it is a 3/4 because the pickup looks huge. It all goes to show that it is in the fingers, not the instrument. It seems she was the opposite of the carpenter who blames his tools. What a terrific player, working live through all the problems she was having with the smaller fretboard on the single note work. A another giveaway is her looking so much at the fretboard. She almost always played with her eyes closed.

I've seen Barbara Dennerlien twice back in the 1990s, in 1991 at the then new Jazz Cafe in Camden Town then in 1997 at Ronnie Scotts. Not sure if Barbara has been back to London recently - the 1990s was a good decade for Jazz acts coming to Britain.

Krunchy
04-26-2011, 06:12 PM
Since I have you set up for the kill ;), better sit down for this one.
That is one of the nicest versions of MFV I have ever heard (next to Coltrane & McCoy Tyner's) & yes, I suppose you are right about talent running in the family, very evident here for sure. Just kind of depresses me a little more knowing she's no longer with us, still in disbelief she was only 32.

George Benson is always amazing, kind of funny seeing him so casually dressed, I'm so used to his meticulous attire, that guy can play!

Thanks for the great clips :applaud: