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kilgoretrout
01-08-2009, 11:43 AM
Hi
I have a pair of LSR32s that I love, but occasionally blow the mids or tweeters on. I blew another mid. I am paying about $350 in Houston for someone to fix them.

On a recommendation on this forum, I called JBL. They are selling the mids for about half of what I am paying here in Houston.

I know my way around a soldering iron, though I am not sure there is any soldering on this repair job - just a few screws.

JBL will not sell directly to me as I am not a dealer or authorized repair shop.

Do any of you on this forum sell the mid for the LSR 32? It is the 331366-001X i am looking for.

Thanks a ton.

rdgrimes
01-08-2009, 03:57 PM
I think you might want to examine the reasons for why you're "blowing" speakers. this is not normal, especially with pro drivers. They are rated to 1000W peak and 200W continuous. Are you by chance over-driving with an under-powered amp? With a correct setup and proper use, these should never fail.

As to your question, the C500G driver appears to be used in several models, you might want to look for a used pair to use for parts.

kilgoretrout
01-08-2009, 04:15 PM
I have them in a home recording studio. Unfortunately, my Mackie D8B wakes up bad sometimes and spits out tons of digital hash. Also, my modular has some extreme responses. Add to the fact that I am half deaf...

I have an Adcom GFA 555 200 W/C amp. It has powered bigger speakers than these before.

Mr. Widget
01-08-2009, 05:14 PM
Unfortunately, my Mackie D8B wakes up bad sometimes and spits out tons of digital hash. Also, my modular has some extreme responses.So power up the Mackie, let it stabilize and then power up the amp. This is actually the proper way to power up any system.

Extreme response from your modular? Could you elaborate?


Widget

grumpy
01-08-2009, 05:45 PM
Extreme response from your modular?

Check K'trout's avatar. How to blow speakers without really trying. :)

One can generate massive ULF or UHF energy if amplified without
compression/limiting before sending to -monitors-... or pure tones that
don't -sound- loud but can smoke a voice coil.

mech986
01-08-2009, 07:27 PM
From a post by K'trout earlier this year:

"Hi
I have a home recording studio that has a bunch of oddball equipment that eats my mid-range drivers on my LSR 32s. This oddball equipment includes old modular synthesizers who can spit and bubble all kinds of cool stuff, but the LSRs don't like the modulars. Its a shame because the LSR 32s sound good."

Definitely sounds like either the modular synthesizers or the Mackie is kicking out some nasty transients or maybe even DC which is getting through via the Adcom.

Likely the modulars need to be gone through to replace old electrolytics that have become leaky or even shorted in the audio path, as well as probably address the power supply and DC offsets. The Mackie and the synths should be turned on long before the speakers are to protect against hash and distortion as noted by Mr. Widget but I suspect if your equipment is acting up unpredictably, your speakers are always going to be at risk, especially if you fail to follow sequential turnoff/on even once.

Seems to me you really need to go through your gear to ensure its operating correctly - they shouldn't be able to send out transients like that to damage speakers downstream. Or provide some type of filtering that MAY offer some protection, or fuse the speakers lightly to protect them.

Otherwise, if you tend to play them loud, you really need something more robust which can play the extremes without being damaged. As good as the LSR's are, a small woofer driven hard will be at risk compared to a larger, more dynamic system, which can be more efficient and louder while tolerating (maybe) what your system gives it.

You've posted this problem before since mid 2007 IIRC, how many drivers have you lost so far?

Bart

toddalin
01-09-2009, 04:25 PM
Hi

Thanks a ton.


Is your Avatar a group of Arp 2500 modules? Cool!

http://audioheritage.org/vbulletin/image.php?u=8660&dateline=1187035720

kilgoretrout
01-09-2009, 07:29 PM
My avatar is my Modcan modular. I have a 2600 and a Synthi AKS too.

I have probably in the what - 10 years of owning these things - gone through 10-12 replacements. About once a year.

The mackie aint the only thing taking them out. The Modcan is vicious on speakers. Most of my friends with modulars have the same thing.

And I know there are lots of precautions, but one of the most fun things to do with a modular is to set up say 10 LFOs - some really really slow - routing things to different filters, Voltage Controlled Amplifiers, panners, delays.... and setting up a sequence to play through and hit run on the sequencer and let the thing evolve on its own over like 5 minutes. Unfortunately, you get some occasional too high resonance or an FM of an oscillator that generates too much high frequency stuff. They are really hard on speakers. But it is pure analog heaven.

And the Modcan is only 3 years old. The Synthi had parts of its guts replaced about 3 years ago, and 5 on the 2600. It is not a fault of the synths being old, it is an artifact of the way the filters have been designed.

toddalin
01-10-2009, 10:11 AM
My avatar is my Modcan modular. I have a 2600 and a Synthi AKS too.

I have probably in the what - 10 years of owning these things - gone through 10-12 replacements. About once a year.

The mackie aint the only thing taking them out. The Modcan is vicious on speakers. Most of my friends with modulars have the same thing.

And I know there are lots of precautions, but one of the most fun things to do with a modular is to set up say 10 LFOs - some really really slow - routing things to different filters, Voltage Controlled Amplifiers, panners, delays.... and setting up a sequence to play through and hit run on the sequencer and let the thing evolve on its own over like 5 minutes. Unfortunately, you get some occasional too high resonance or an FM of an oscillator that generates too much high frequency stuff. They are really hard on speakers. But it is pure analog heaven.

And the Modcan is only 3 years old. The Synthi had parts of its guts replaced about 3 years ago, and 5 on the 2600. It is not a fault of the synths being old, it is an artifact of the way the filters have been designed.

Cool! Had never seen/heard of Modcan before. From the avatar, it looked like a bunch of Arp 2500 modules. Of course the Arp used a matrix system rather than patch cords.

http://www.synthmuseum.com/arp/arp250001.jpg

http://www.synthmuseum.com/arp/arp250001a.jpg

It's been over 30 years since I sold my Electrocomp

http://www.synthmuseum.com/eml/eml101bro.jpg

and Moog.

http://www.vintagesynth.com/moog/satellite.jpg

Mr. Widget
01-10-2009, 10:52 AM
And I know there are lots of precautions, but one of the most fun things to do with a modular is to set up say 10 LFOs - some really really slow - routing things to different filters, Voltage Controlled Amplifiers, panners, delays.... and setting up a sequence to play through and hit run on the sequencer and let the thing evolve on its own over like 5 minutes. Unfortunately, you get some occasional too high resonance or an FM of an oscillator that generates too much high frequency stuff. They are really hard on speakers.Now I see what the problem is. You are using the wrong type of speakers. You need a musical instrument system that can take the abuse. In your LSRs there is a very delicate and articulate mid driver that plays down to 200Hz... you are simply using the wrong speakers. I am sure you could find some vintage keyboard system that would sound great with your synth and withstand it's tortuous signals.


Widget

mikebake
01-10-2009, 03:01 PM
I have probably in the what - 10 years of owning these things - gone through 10-12 replacements. About once a year.


After all those blown drivers and all that money and time, didn't it occur to you to try another solution/stop using the 32's in this application?
Absolutely correct, you don't want a monitor for this, you need an MI/SR speaker. Several of them will (properly instituted) handle anything your synths can crank out. Believe me.