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Ducatista47
08-26-2008, 09:52 PM
I was messing around with YouTube the other day and saw a tribute to the 70th anniversary of the Hammond organ. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Ck__wghRww (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Ck__wghRww)In the related videos I discovered a great player I had never heard of. I thought it would be interesting to have a thread about our favorite organists. Hammond B3, pipe organ, Farfisa, Vox, anything is fair game. I'll start things off with my two favorite artists, both B3 players.

Being a Jazz head, Larry Young is the head of the class for me. He is far less known than Jimmy Smith, but he was closer to my taste for deeper, heavier jazz styles. The CD Unity is available and reasonably priced. It is one of those remastered Rudy Van Gelder albums - remastered by Rudy. The 1965 session is a very good example of why I think he was the greatest. Back in 1975 when I turned on to heavier jazz, a Larry Young album was one of the reasons why.

A disciple, more or less, is my recent discovery. She sounds more like Young than anyone else I have heard, at least sometimes, and she is an amazing technical player as well. The German Barbara Dennerlein plays the B3 with what might pass to some as a normal mode of hand usage, but her left leg plays pedal bass with the speed of a Fender Jazz Bass player. She therefore seldom uses a bass player, but has played with some very impressive talent. She has a CD with Straight Ahead and often used Andy Sheppard as her reed man. My limited German leads me to believe her name is pronounced like "daner-line."

Barbara's recordings are either mostly out of print or not imported to the USA. There are two CD's recently released on a Japanese label, but are rather expensive. She is so good I am actually thinking of ordering them at forty dollars each. There are I think three other discs availlable new. She can be seen on YouTube - a search will turn up performances starting in the eighties. Here is a nice place to start: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=60ut7yIuCE (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=60ut7yIuCEY)
A search will reveal two pages of videos. Her B3 playing is the hottest you will ever hear, and she is very convincing bringing her modern sensibilities to the pipe organ.

I lied, let me do one more. Having seen a great Blind Faith gig back in the day, Steve Winwood. What a great B3 man he is. The recordings give only a hint of what he can do. While we are at it, don't forget his work in Traffic.

So who do you like?


Clark

richluvsound
08-26-2008, 10:09 PM
there was a young lady I met on holiday in Italy a few years back !:p

Sorry Clark:(

Ducatista47
08-26-2008, 10:22 PM
Nice one, Rich :applaud:
I can't wait to hear what Ian has to say about your taste in "organ-ists." I should not have ended the list of British organs with Vox, apparently.

I am also expecting some of our esteemed German forum members to wonder out loud why we have not heard of the Goddess of German Jazz.

Clark

Ducatista47
08-26-2008, 11:11 PM
A good friend of mine tells me that Richard "Groove" Holmes was something else. Is anyone familiar with his work?

Clark

Benatti
08-27-2008, 03:48 AM
I had the chance to attend the living creature in Brazil, the Bruce Katz here, touching a Hammond B3, in the house of spectacles Bourbon Street in São Paulo, Capital.
James Benatti Lansing
http://image.allmusic.com/00/amg/pic200/drp300/p399/p39966dkzmc.jpg
http://image.allmusic.com/00/amg/cov200/drd800/d893/d89376ec6q2.jpg

BMWCCA
08-27-2008, 04:56 AM
I'm a simple man, easily amused: Lee Michaels "Fifth": http://www.amazon.com/Fifth-Lee-Michaels/dp/B000002R8D

mikebake
08-27-2008, 05:23 AM
Jimmy McGriff, Groove Holmes had some good stuff, also check out Tony Monaco.

grumpy
08-27-2008, 08:08 AM
Joey DeFrancesco can be a good listen for B3 folks.

E. Power Biggs recordings also occupy a few slots on my shelf, along with some
other famous, enjoyable classical pipe organ artist recordings, but for some reason,
I have a fondness for the Biggs renditions.

doodlebug
08-27-2008, 08:34 AM
Joey DeFrancesco can be a good listen for B3 folks.

E. Power Biggs recordings also occupy a few slots on my shelf, along with some
other famous, enjoyable classical pipe organ artist recordings, but for some reason,
I have a fondness for the Biggs renditions.

A few years ago, I got to see Joey DeFrancesco _and_ Jimmy Smith together in what was termed the Passing of the Torch organ duel. It was quite the show, I must say, and only a few months later Jimmy was gone. We lost Jimmy McGriff this year, too. We still have Shirly Scott and the good Dr. Lonnie Smith still around, though.

I was also able to catch Tony Monaco at a show here in Santa Cruz a bit over a year ago, too. This guy is one bundle of energy, too. At the show at Moe's Alley, he had dual Leslies flying behind him plus drums and guitar. The guy does know his stuff, I must say, and when he kicked those Leslies into high, the whole dang place seemed to levitate. There's nothing like that Hammond sound through those revolving speakers.

Cheers,

David

Ducatista47
08-27-2008, 09:07 AM
E. Power Biggs recordings also occupy a few slots on my shelf, along with some
other famous, enjoyable classical pipe organ artist recordings, but for some reason,
I have a fondness for the Biggs renditions.

So do I. Biggs always gets the nod if I have a rendition of the piece by him, especially for Bach. The other I turn to for that repertoire is Albert Schweitzer. His recordings of Bach from around 1935 are not hifi, but the power and faith come through just fine.

I saw Lee Michaels (the duo) in the late sixties. I still have some vinyl. The last I heard of him was a Guitar Player interview years later. He had taken to the six string and ended by saying, "Keyboards are just fading from my life." You know what i mean?

I need to check out Bruce Katz. And if you like flamboyant players, who was that guy in Focus?

Clark

mikebake
08-27-2008, 10:14 AM
A few years ago, I got to see Joey DeFrancesco _and_ Jimmy Smith together in what was termed the Passing of the Torch organ duel. It was quite the show, I must say, and only a few months later Jimmy was gone. We lost Jimmy McGriff this year, too. We still have Shirly Scott and the good Dr. Lonnie Smith still around, though.

I was also able to catch Tony Monaco at a show here in Santa Cruz a bit over a year ago, too. This guy is one bundle of energy, too. At the show at Moe's Alley, he had dual Leslies flying behind him plus drums and guitar. The guy does know his stuff, I must say, and when he kicked those Leslies into high, the whole dang place seemed to levitate. There's nothing like that Hammond sound through those revolving speakers.

Cheers,

David
I have had Tony at my venues a number of times, and he is something of a friend. His story leading to playing B3 is interesting, and he can get down on that thing!
http://www.b3monaco.com/index.htm

Krunchy
08-27-2008, 10:42 AM
there was a young lady I met on holiday in Italy a few years back !:p

Sorry Clark:(
:rotfl: :rotfl: :D !!! Its good to have you back Rich!

Hi Clark! you always bring up interesting subjects, thank you. What about the Moog, would that be considerable in this context, its such a funky instrument (is it an instrument)??? This should be a fun thread, cant wait to see what shows up on this list. :)

richluvsound
08-27-2008, 11:24 AM
[QUOTE=Krunchy;219057]:rotfl: :rotfl: :D !!! Its good to have you back Rich!



Iv'e missed you guys too :D xxxxxxxxx

I'll shut me mouth now and hope to learn a little .

Rich

Hoerninger
08-27-2008, 11:31 AM
What about the Moog, would that be considerable in this context, its such a funky instrument (is it an instrument)??? This should be a fun thread, cant wait to see what shows up on this list. :)

Moog ... thank you for playing the ball, Krunchy!

In may I was at a concert "Oldie Nacht" in Bad Segeberg, look here:
http://de.youtube.com/watch?v=1J21YdQzcfg&feature=related
Among many other artists - do you remember the Shadows? - there was SAILOR, great live performers.

They were happy with their NICKELODEON:
http://www.sailor-marinero.com/nickelodeon10.jpg
" The instrument is basically Georg's brain-child and is in fact the casing of two upright pianos moulded together to look like an old-fashioned barrel-organ and raised on a rostrum so that it can be played standing up.
Georg rigged up some piano keys to a Piano Mate, two synthesisers and a glockenspiel device was adapted from a series of doorbell mechanism which instead of activating a clapper to hit a bell now sets of little hammers against glockenspiel bars."
[http://www.sailor-marinero.com/nickelodeon.htm] (http://www.sailor-marinero.com/index.htm%5D)

Clark, organ is not my favorit instrument. But I will add some thoughts I have collected during this day.
____________
Peter

Rusnzha
08-27-2008, 12:07 PM
Originally posted by Ducatista47
need to check out Bruce Katz. And if you like flamboyant players, who was that guy in Focus?


Jan Akkerman -- Guitars and Synthesizers
Thijs Van Leer -- Keyboards: Roland JX-3P, Steinway + Bechstein piano, Fairlight, Yamaha DX-7, M.S.Q. 700digital keyboard recorder, Hammond organ, Fender Rhodes Piano, flutes & vocals

One of my favorite players is Jimmy Smith's student, Brian Auger. He has been kicking ass for 40 years now.

toddalin
08-27-2008, 12:10 PM
Speaking of Hammond's birthday,

My Hammond would be close to 70 years old now. It was a Model D manufactured between 1939 and 1942.

It sounded "meaner" than any B3 and (as I recall) had less "fold over" than the B3.

I traded an M3 and a Wurlitzer electric piano for it straight across and it included a Leslie 122RV (this was in ~1969).

I later picked up a "combo pedal" with a Leslie 147RV so I could put my other keyboards though the Leslie also.

Because the 122 and 147 differ internally and the 122 cannot be driven by the combo pedal, I opened up the 122 and using the 147 as a guide, made the 122 into a 147 by removing some parts and rewiring others (one of my first electronic projects). This worked out perfectly.

When the organ was transported from Las Vegas to LA, my friend who was delivering it hit the inspection station with his van totalling the case and damaging the Leslies.

Valley Sound cut the organ down, but I retained the pedals (a heck of an amphenol connector to the console!) and they added percussion. All the internal tube electronics were removed in the interest of weight. Because of this, the tone wheels would produce sound even with the organ shut off and you could do neat effects by hitting the "start" and "run" switches slowing and speeding up the tone wheels.

The output from the tone wheels is just like a guitar pick-up and can be plugged directly into a high impedience input (guitar amp) without any electronic interface. Valley Sound simply added a 1/4" phone jack to the back. (No Jon Lord didn't need a modification to do this and there is an RCA connector above the swell pedal that also gives direct access to the tone wheels.) The Leslies were refinished in black. The cost for this was $3,000 in 1972 dollars. Insurance paid it all.

BTW, my favorite keyboard player is Keith Emerson. But in a whole 'nother vein, George Duke is really good too.

boputnam
08-27-2008, 02:16 PM
The German Barbara Dennerlein plays the B3 with what might pass to some as a normal mode of hand usage, but her left leg plays pedal bass with the speed of a Fender Jazz Bass player. Hi, Clark...

Good pick! Dennerlein is truly one of a kind.

My other favorites are gentlemen of the B3 that supported the Jerry Garcia Band, Merle Saunders, and of course Melvin Seals (www.jgbband.com). Their work is pretty vast in the R&B and Rock genres - legendary players.


Yes, I work with Melvin these days, but that is luck - not merely a bias... :)

Krunchy
08-27-2008, 02:19 PM
Moog ... thank you for playing the ball, Krunchy!

Anytime Peter! ;) :) :D

doodlebug
08-27-2008, 03:39 PM
Ooops, just remembered another great one....Chester Thompson from the early 70s Tower of Power......

Cheers,

David

Rusnzha
08-27-2008, 04:23 PM
Originally posted by doodlebug
Ooops, just remembered another great one....Chester Thompson from the early 70s Tower of Power......

Is this the same Chester Thompson that has been with Santana for many years. I saw Santana in concert a few times and the guy is a monster.

doodlebug
08-27-2008, 04:41 PM
Is this the same Chester Thompson that has been with Santana for many years. I saw Santana in concert a few times and the guy is a monster.

One and the same.....

Ducatista47
08-27-2008, 07:41 PM
One of my favorite Santana cuts in the title track from Blues For Salvador. It begins suddenly because they happened to roll tape while Carlos and Chester were messing around. I recall Santana having dismissed the piece when his wife, I think, pointed out it was great. He protested they were just playing, not putting together a song. She said he'd better put it out for people to hear. I think sometimes Santana was just Carlos and Chester; certainly Santana's main musical partnership for many, many years now. Chester is great at laying back behind another musician.

Santana's earlier Gregg Rolie and Tom Coster eras were not bad either. Coster held forth on the keys during the Moonflower time period.

Clark

Ducatista47
08-27-2008, 10:20 PM
Jan Akkerman -- Guitars and Synthesizers
Thijs Van Leer -- Keyboards: Roland JX-3P, Steinway + Bechstein piano, Fairlight, Yamaha DX-7, M.S.Q. 700digital keyboard recorder, Hammond organ, Fender Rhodes Piano, flutes & vocals

One of my favorite players is Jimmy Smith's student, Brian Auger. He has been kicking ass for 40 years now.

Thanks! Wasn't it van Leer who did those unforgettable vocals? I'll have to dig out my vinyl of Hamburger Concerto.

You are bringing me back to my Hippie days. Do you remember the outfit Julie Driscoll, Brian Auger & the Trinity? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WWh6xkVNPmw&feature=related

Wow, this album of his sounds really nice: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P-ATRdIAFO4&feature=related

Another I remember very fondly, a member of a great band, the Animals, Alan Price. Here is an early lip-sync, but nice shots of AP on the Vox. Who knows what he recorded it with, I would guess a nice Hammond. Then again, it does sound pretty cheesy. The tall bass player with the beautiful Gibson f hole is Chas Chandler, later Jimi's impresario.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tBGXwX-TdTY&feature=related

Matthew Fisher of Procol Harum electrified me with A Whiter Shade Of Pale.
From Wiki: "With a structure reminiscent of Baroque music, realized in the contrapuntal (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contrapuntal), heavily ornamented lines assigned to Fisher's Hammond organ, Brooker's soulful vocals and Reid's mysterious lyrics, "A Whiter Shade of Pale (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Whiter_Shade_of_Pale)" reached #1 on the British charts and did almost as well in the United States (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States), reaching #5. In the years since, it has become an enduring classic, placing on several polls of the best songs ever." The mysterious lyrics seem to be about our drunken hero realizing he must make it to the public bathroom in time to relieve his bladder in a socially acceptable manner. Not very mysterious for those of us who have been through it, that is to say nearly all of us!

Clark

Hofmannhp
08-28-2008, 03:51 AM
Hi All,

don't forget Keith Emerson

HP

Benatti
08-28-2008, 07:03 AM
Hi,

Don't forget George Duke too.

James Benatti Lansing

http://image.allmusic.com/00/amg/cov200/drd600/d677/d677776p60g.jpg

Titanium Dome
08-28-2008, 10:18 AM
One of my faves is the man with the unfortunate homonym for a name, Dick Hyman. (cruel parents or just dumb? :dont-know ) His jazz, classical, ragtime, and original works have always satisfied me. He's both musician and composer, a combination that many keyboardists claim, but few have the actual credentials to prove it. He frequently used a Lowrey organ, as well as a Moog later on.

Another is Jon Lord of Deep Purple fame. He was one of the constants in the many iterations of Deep Purple, a real five-man group in the days of power trios and rock band quartets. His versatile stylings and creative talents created many memorable riffs and standards of the rock and progressive rock genre. Yep, he was a Hammond guy.

Benatti
08-28-2008, 10:47 AM
One of my faves is the man with the unfortunate homonym for a name, Dick Hyman. (cruel parents or just dumb? :dont-know ) His jazz, classical, ragtime, and original works have always satisfied me...

Titanium,

I have all the CD' s of the Dick Hyman of Reference Recordings. The CD "From the Age of Swing" (RR-59CD) it is my favourite to evaluate the quality of "seam" between the drivers/speakers.

http://image.allmusic.com/00/amg/cov200/drd800/d838/d83827wp2h6.jpg

James Benatti Lansing

Titanium Dome
08-28-2008, 03:08 PM
Titanium,

I have all the CD' s of the Dick Hyman of Reference Recordings. The CD "From the Age of Swing" (RR-59CD) it is my favourite to evaluate the quality of "seam" between the drivers/speakers.



Yes, many of his recordings were first rate productions. They make excellent audition material.

Hoerninger
08-28-2008, 03:47 PM
Some organists are already mentioned:

Jon Lord.
Although I always listen to the guitars, Deep Purple without Jon Lord on the Hammond organ is unthinkable.

Brian Auger.
He was the first I got in mind when I started to read this thread. I know only a part of him, at least "In And Out" with Julie Driscoll and the Trinity. My absolute favorite is "Season of the witch". The interplay (?) between Julie Driscoll and Brian Auger is remarkable, although my attention is always caught by the drumming, no drum-machine - each beat is worth to listen to.

As said organ is not my favorit instrument. But I want to mention some German artists which will hardly be known to you.

Gerhard Gregor (http://www.okey-online.com/artikel/054_report/index.html).
He is a German organ legend although you can not find much about him in the Internet. And there is hardly any music achievable as he worked for a radio station.
He worked in Hamburg for the NWDR (Nordwestdeutscher Rundfunk (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nordwestdeutscher_Rundfunk)) and got a Hammond in 1948. He brought the Hammond sound to me! He played on a "Welte-Funkorgel" as well. When I think of Hammond I immadiately get in mind "Gerhard Gregor an der Hammondorgel" as he was often heard in the radio.

Franz Lambert (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franz_Lambert).
Until 1974 on Hammond, later on WERSI (http://www.wersi.net/). Many got to know him, when he played on a huge WERSI in Fußball stadiums (no football ). Franz Lambert is a great musician.

Tribute to the unknown church organist.
There are many fully qualified organists which are often only heard at church service, but there is more. I once bought a LP about historic organs in Rheinland (a state like Bavaria). There was recorded a choral "Liebster Jesu, wir sind hier" by Johann Sebastian Bach in the church of Füssenich by the organist Günter Eumann. It is a very intimate play with a warm and gentle bass fundament.
The LP can not be bought anymore as I suppose, but it is archived in the Deutsches Musikarchiv (http://dispatch.opac.d-nb.de/):
http://dispatch.opac.d-nb.de/DB=2.1/SET=1/TTL=1/SHW?FRST=2
___________
Peter

doodlebug
08-28-2008, 05:10 PM
I keep thinking about other wonderful organists I've heard recordings of. Here's one of the best Bach organists: Helmuth Rilling (http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Bio/Rilling-Helmuth.htm).

My parents had a number of recordings of his - a Bach box, engineered by Bert Whyte, I believe.

I wish I still had those mono recordings made sometime in the late 50s.

Cheers,

David

Ducatista47
08-28-2008, 08:04 PM
Since synths seem to be part and parcel of this thread, I put forth Vince Clarke of Erasure. You should see the dedicated building in his yard full of gear. It is round and very fully packed. Everything appears to be working and patched up. Even the building is fascinating. It can be viewed in their Albert Hall DVD extras.

Vince can also be heard in early Depeche Mode (he was a founding member) and of course in Yazoo with Alison Moyet.

I am personally quite taken with the Novachord Restoration Project CD, Music Of The Electron. Played by Phil Cirocco, it is not programmed like so much synth music but rather played live on the fantastic polyphonic, all tube instrument. His style is completely suited to the Novachord. Available on the Cd Baby web site.

Clark

Rusnzha
08-30-2008, 12:14 AM
Originally posted by Ducatista47
Thanks! Wasn't it van Leer who did those unforgettable vocals? I'll have to dig out my vinyl of Hamburger Concerto.


It's got to be Van Leer. He is the only one given credit for vocals on my Focus CD.



Originally posted by Ducatista47
You are bringing me back to my Hippie days. Do you remember the outfit Julie Driscoll, Brian Auger & the Trinity?


The first I heard of Brian Auger was the original Oblivion Express which I just got my third or fourth version of on one of those goody good good Japanese remasters. I discovered the really early stuff later on scanning amazon.com. A lot of good stuff never showed up in stores, but the internet makes it a lot easier to know what's around.

http://www.amazon.com/Encore-Brian-Auger-Julie-Tippetts/dp/B000PHW1WI/ref=sr_1_11?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1220082307&sr=1-11

Check this out -- Brian Auger & Julie Tippetts made in 2007. I started thinking about this stuff and the next thing I know, I ordered another CD.

Benatti
08-30-2008, 10:41 AM
It is one another organist that taste very. Many must know it. I have innumerable records of it.
James Benatti Lansing

Rusnzha
08-31-2008, 10:29 PM
Checked out Gonzalo on amazon.com. Sure ain't smooth jazz -- that's a good thing. Very interesting!!! :cheers:

sonofagun
09-01-2008, 04:45 PM
Old album I bought many years ago was titled "Mighty High" by an organist named Milt Buckner.

One of my all time favorite kick ass tunes is "The Turnaround" by Big John Patton on his album "Let 'em Roll" - W/Grant Green on guitar - it rocks! :applaud:

Tim Rinkerman
09-11-2008, 11:30 AM
John Novello keyboard player for "Niacin" (vitamin B-3, get it? )old school rock organ playing with a modern bent. The bass player, Bill Sheehan is an old friend of mine, but I still like the band!! Just kidding Bill..!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mnvbCMzFQRI

SMKSoundPro
09-11-2008, 12:53 PM
This is best organ-grinder I have ever heard! Made a pretty good dad, too.

Doc Mark
09-12-2008, 06:57 PM
Hey, All,

This is, mainly, to Scotty. Lad, I'm really tickled that your Dad was an organist, and that you still have that old newspaper clipping about him playing at that event! VERY cool, and very important to keep that old stuff. It is our past that defines our present and our future, depending on how we use the past to our advantage. In my humble opinion, you're going about it in the absolutely perfect manner!! Keep it up, my Friend, and keep that link to your past. I do the same with my own Dad, who, despite his many faults, was a pretty good trombone player, and actually played with Stan Kenton one Summer. Your comments about your Dad, reminded me of my own. Thanks, very much! Take care, and God Bless!

Every Good Wish,
Doc (King 3B trombone, King M1130 Fluegabone, drums, Latin percussion, and lead vocals)

Ducatista47
09-12-2008, 08:41 PM
I didn't want to totally hijack this thread,explaining the way tones and harmonics are added and layered would take a bit...

Well, I started this thread if I remember correctly, and I am most interested in these revelations regarding the Hammond organ and Leslie speakers. If anyone would like to get technical about the Novachord, other Hammond products, other company's organs or synths I am also on board. I prefer the sound of the tube stuff, but it is all good with me.

As long as there is still room for the inclusion of organists and their music, please hijack on!

Clark

toddalin
09-15-2008, 10:58 AM
It has just come to my attention that Richard Wright passed away today. While many may not be familiar with the name, you are probably familiar with his work.

Richard Wright was the keyboard player with Pink Floyd and recorded on the Dark Side of the Moon (as well as their other hit albums) which held the top of the charts for God knows how long.

While Richard certainly wouldn't be classified as one of the virtuoso keyboardists, virtuosity is by no means a requirement for success or appeal. (Look at Gregg Allman for proof of that :barf:)

Richard had a style and taste for music that obviously was quite different and commercially accepted in its day as it still is.

Richard was always apprehensive about his talents and this is reflected in the ramblings heard in DSOM as well as in many of the interviews he gave over the years. (Actually, this was characteristic of the Floyd in general.)

Richard was 65 and died of cancer. He will be missed.

John
09-15-2008, 05:11 PM
It has just come to my attention that Richard Wright passed away today. While many may not be familiar with the name, you are probably familiar with his work.

Richard Wright was the keyboard player with Pink Floyd and recorded on the Dark Side of the Moon (as well as their other hit albums) which held the top of the charts for God knows how long.

While Richard certainly wouldn't be classified as one of the virtuoso keyboardists, virtuosity is by no means a requirement for success or appeal. (Look at Gregg Allman for proof of that :barf:)

Richard had a style and taste for music that obviously was quite different and commercially accepted in its day as it still is.

Richard was always apprehensive about his talents and this is reflected in the ramblings heard in DSOM as well as in many of the interviews he gave over the years. (Actually, this was characteristic of the Floyd in general.)

Richard was 65 and died of cancer. He will be missed.

Sad to hear:(

For anyone that is interested pick up the DVD, "Pink Floyd The making of The dark side of the moon" It was a VH1 special. For around $10-12 at walmart I think any one even slightly into Floyd will enjoy it.
Very modest guys in the Floyd.:)
Running time 84 mins and 16:9 format.

alotawatts
09-19-2008, 01:21 AM
I'm convinced Jon Lord and (remember this guy?) Goldie McJohn completely bypassed the preamp(s) to get such nasty sounds.
http://www.goldymcjohn.com/history.html

http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y244/alotawatts/goldymcjohn.jpg

Tim Rinkerman
09-19-2008, 08:02 AM
Rumor has it that the Steppenwolf organ sound is a result of having blown up the horn driver in his leslie, Goldie simply bypassed the crossover and wired the 15" full range....I tend to believe it, because it explains the tonality and the way the higher frequencies speed up and slow down at a slower rate because they are all coming through the bass rotor. Try it..(I did,) and play a couple licks from Magic Carpet ride...you'll hear what I'm talking about....Tim

Ducatista47
09-21-2008, 08:22 PM
I have found sources in the US for Cd's.

CD Baby has five different offerings right now. They have generous two minute mp3 samples of most cuts on each CD. Me, I like all five and had better save my money. http://cdbaby.com/cd/dennerlein3

A Google search in the "Shopping" category revealed a slew of titles from various sites. http://www.google.com/products?hl=en&q=barbara%20dennerlein&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=wf

Her MySpace site has a little listen to Tribute To Charlie. I am going to be looking for this album at a reasonable price! http://profile.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=user.viewprofile&friendid=71430717

I frankly think the title Bebab is not worth the expensive Japanese CD. I have heard it, and in my opinion the backing musicians are not in sync with her sensibilities enough to carry it off.

Clark

Tim Rinkerman
09-22-2008, 07:24 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vf4tbCRuvSk&mode=related&search=
I keep this one in my favorites....

toddalin
09-23-2008, 10:32 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vf4tbCRuvSk&mode=related&search=
I keep this one in my favorites....

Her left foot kicks butt over Ray Manzarek's left hand. :applaud:

Ducatista47
09-23-2008, 09:29 PM
Her left foot kicks butt over Ray Manzarek's left hand. :applaud:

Isn't she wonderful! Those are acoustic bass lines and she does them with the same great facility and taste she plays everything with. I think she is a major artist.

Not a musical observation, but did anyone notice how beautiful she is? When I thought of German ladies and music I pictured two hundred pound opera singers wearing a helmet with horns and singing Wagner. That stereotype in my head has been replaced by this Jazz Angel.

Try this one. Fun video too. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T7KQnlYj4Jc&NR=1

Clark

Ducatista47
09-23-2008, 09:42 PM
From this page: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=60ut7yIuCEY&NR=1

From: hans1970 (http://www.youtube.com/user/hans1970)
Added: May 14, 2006


Seeing is believing. It looks impossible, but it's true, Barbara Dennerlein plays bass lines with her left foot that I couldn't play with my left hand.

Unlike many organists, she did not begin with piano. When she was 11 years old she began playing organ, including the use of the foot pedals. She took lessons for a year and a half from a teacher who played jazz himself. By the time she was 13 she was completely on her own in regard to her musical development.

Charlie Parker was her musical hero and biggest influence. While she respects Jimmy Smith's musicianship and his enormous contribution to jazz organ, she did not model her playing, sound, technique or musical approach after his.

Like Jimmy, she developed her own personal style and unmistakable sound. Her artistic sensibilities are closer to Larry Young than Jimmy Smith, but they are still very much her own.

In the 80's Jimmy Smith briefly moved from Hammond B3 to another make of organ, experimented with synthesizers and even played electric piano. In the 80's Barbara also began to experiment, but she took a different approach.

She integrated midi technology into her B3 keyboard and sampled an upright bass to give her bass pedals a more realistic sound.

This video is one small glimpse into her musical world, I hope you'll view the other clips on my channel, and enjoy clips by other great B3 players. My hope is that music is enjoyed as a celebration, and not a competition - it's art not sport.

Barbara Dennerlein, Hammond B3 Organ. Dennis Chambers, Drums. (Not shown on clip: Andy Sheppard, Sax, Mitch Watkins, Guitar.) Vienna, 1992

Seeing is believing.

Tim Rinkerman
09-24-2008, 09:20 AM
Her left foot kicks butt over Ray Manzarek's left hand. :applaud:
Her left foot kicks butt over alot of bass players BOTH hands!!!!

toddalin
09-24-2008, 10:20 AM
From this page: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=60ut7yIuCEY&NR=1

From: hans1970 (http://www.youtube.com/user/hans1970)
Added: May 14, 2006



She integrated midi technology into her B3 keyboard and sampled an upright bass to give her bass pedals a more realistic sound.
Seeing is believing.

If you listen to the video, you will hear the Hammond sound similar to a vibraphone/celeste. This would also be done ala midi-interface.

rdgrimes
10-31-2008, 08:42 AM
Here's a little video about the new $3,000,000 organ at the Orange Co Performing Arts Center:

http://media2.ocregister.com/slideshow/slices_organ_sz/

shaansloan
10-31-2008, 03:55 PM
Here's a little video about the new $3,000,000 organ at the Orange Co Performing Arts Center:

http://media2.ocregister.com/slideshow/slices_organ_sz/

Wow....that is a stunning and beautiful piece of craftsmanship!

Thanks for sharing....

Hoerninger
11-01-2008, 01:34 PM
Clark,

thank you for introducing Barbara Dennerlein. What an organ player!
I read on her home page (http://www.barbaradennerlein.com/en/bebabrecords/index.php):

"For all of my fans who really love the Hammond-organ I want to recommend my CD Solo. On that CD you can check out the pure Hammond-organ sound in a Solo concert, recorded without any overdubs. I just sat down and played in front of a great audience simply with my modified Hammond-organ and playing my foot-pedal bass."

(Contact me if you want a CD from Germany (http://www.barbaradennerlein.com/en/order/index.php), I see a very easy way.)
____________
Peter

PS: "When I thought of German ladies ..."
Ever forgotten "deutsches Fräulein"? :)

musicfann
11-02-2008, 07:39 AM
This is a great compilation of SOME of the 60's greats !

The Happy Organ Man..Dave "Baby" Cortez...is missing, but they have Stevie Winwood and Brian Auger !


http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61BA6318KTL._SL500_AA240_.jpg

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41G79WE0VRL._SS400_.jpg

Ducatista47
11-02-2008, 08:11 AM
Clark,

thank you for introducing Barbara Dennerlein. What an organ player!
I read on her home page (http://www.barbaradennerlein.com/en/bebabrecords/index.php):

"For all of my fans who really love the Hammond-organ I want to recommend my CD Solo. On that CD you can check out the pure Hammond-organ sound in a Solo concert, recorded without any overdubs. I just sat down and played in front of a great audience simply with my modified Hammond-organ and playing my foot-pedal bass."

(Contact me if you want a CD from Germany (http://www.barbaradennerlein.com/en/order/index.php), I see a very easy way.)
____________
Peter


Thank you, Peter. More of her CDs are showing up on CD Baby for sale here, so I may be able to get it here. If not, I will take you up on your kind offer. I did not know if she was well known in Germany or not. I discovered her on YouTube.


PS: "When I thought of German ladies ..."
Ever forgotten "deutsches Fräulein"? :)
"German Girls?" You lost me there. What is your reference? I must say listening to her greeting in English on her website made me fall in love. Any talented, beautiful woman who sounds like that when she talks...I would be road kill in ten seconds. And I can explain that to my German Friend. :)

Musicfann, great tip. Welcome to the forums! I didn't know Dave "Baby" Cortez was from the UK.

Clark

Hoerninger
11-02-2008, 09:21 AM
I did not know if she was well known in Germany or not. I discovered her on YouTube.
Clark, you made me discover her on YouTube :) ! There I watched another video with Harald Schmidts late night show in German television, where he interviewed her and let her play live with the band. Great! Harald Schmidt has a feeling for what is trendy but I missed that show.



"German Girls?"
...I would be road kill in ten seconds. And I can explain that to my German Friend. :)
Yes. Young smiling German ladies perceived by American GIs when they were here. What else should the girls have done? When the war began they were aged round about sixteen.
... and some GIs lost their heart ;) .

Barbara Dennerlein is shurely a pretty person. And she seems to have a very distinct but kind self-assurance (?, Selbstbewußtsein).
____________
Peter

Ducatista47
11-02-2008, 09:47 AM
I hope I do not get moderator attention for this, but the saying is "German girls are best," and that is what I thought you meant. ;)

Of course this is quite on topic as we are talking about Barbara! Do a lot of German ladies have Selbstbewußtsein?

Clark

Hoerninger
11-02-2008, 10:20 AM
... ;)
Clark
;)

"Selbstbewußtsein": I do not want to discuss this in a general and political sense, we just had an OT-course here. :blah:

When I look at the youngsters by daily work it is fine I think with all its individual differences. No sneaks (Duckmäuser).
____________
Peter

Ducatista47
11-02-2008, 11:42 AM
The only distinctly Deutsch quality I know I possess every day, besides my last name, is Fahrfergnugen. We have driven only TDI Volkswagens since 1996. I consider them the automotive equivalent of JBL Pro.

Clark

Hoerninger
11-02-2008, 12:26 PM
FahrvergnügenFor me it is difficulty to make the same differentiation between PRO and CONSUMER for cars the same as for speakers. :dont-know

"Fahrvergnügen " in many aspects is highly appreciated. :thmbsup:
To stay on topic I mean this sometimes roaring unit (not organ) with a pedal (yes) and a pipe (at least one), sometimes called automobil. :)
Favorit cars are obviously BMW, Audi, Mercedes and others (please interpret this as different kinds of music :yes: ). My children tell that it is a great Fahrvergnügen to drive with 240 km/h on the Autobahn (I am sure you know this word ;) ), which is possible in northern Germany at some parts (traffic, speed limit). I have never been that fast. If the engine is not restricted to this speed some cars may be even quicker. With a modern car this is like flying on a cloud.
Breaking is no problem with these cars, but it is a physical challenge for the driver my son tells. (ääh, we surely never listen too loud :nutz: )

And we like good music, don't we?
___________
Peter

rdgrimes
11-07-2008, 02:39 PM
2 very interesting organ discs:

1) J S Bach - The Four Great Toccatas and Fugues,
The four Antiphonal organs of the Cathedral of Freiburg
E Power Biggs
Available on either CD or MCH SACD, this was a mid-70's Quadraphonic recording that has been remastered for 5.1 SACD. Can only be described as stunning in 5.1 on SACD. This cathedral has 4 huge organs installed in different locations, all controlled by a central console and played simultaneously. Makes an astonishing surround effect with a different organ in each corner of your room.

2) "Funky Organ: B3 Jazz Grooves"
In spite of the title, this stereo SACD Hybrid is worth the low cost for any B3 fan. Excellent SQ

lofi-ear
11-09-2008, 12:31 PM
John Medeski from Medeski, Martin & Wood
Robert Walter from Stanton Moore Trio

Funky jazzy vibes, gotta love them :)

Ducatista47
02-14-2009, 11:59 PM
Here is a group that escaped me until now. I am listening to The Ben Sidran Hammond Quartet / Cien Noches ("Recorded live at the Cafe Central, Madrid, Spain") 2008, Bonsai Music, Nardis Music.

The music is a little hard to categorize, mostly club Jazz with a little Rock and some R & B. Most of it sure is fun, though. I could do without the vocals (but then I could always do without the vocals), but these guys have to get bookings to eat.

Hammond B3, sax, drums & guitar.

Clark