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Krunchy
02-21-2008, 08:16 AM
Chest Pounding Bass!
Dont know if we already have/had one of these threads (nothing came up on search?) but how about the Lowly BASS.
As always the bass player rarely gets much attention and without them the Groove just wouldnt sound the same.

Lets not limit it to Rock for Jazz has had some great talent as well -
and besides...We All Love Really Good Bass! :banana: :dancin:

I'll start, one of my favorites has always been Stanley Clarke (kind of obvious but what the hey!) more of a jazz fusion thing but his early stuff is really amazing. Has featured a lot of great guitar players to complement his style...Jeff Beck, Bill Connors and John McLaughlin to name a few. His more recent stuff is a little tame, his 70's stuff is the ticket ;)



http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/513I0IIlILL._SS500_.jpg

BMWCCA
02-21-2008, 08:38 AM
Far from my field of expertise but, never being short on opinions, I'll offer two of my favorites:

Michael Manring: http://www.manthing.com/

Andy Frazier: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andy_Fraser

richluvsound
02-21-2008, 09:01 AM
Tony Levin :applaud:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WcbSjC9tAY8

Andyoz and I saw this guy with Gabriel last summer. Amazing to watch this man play. Stanley Clark can rock the boat too ! "Illegal" from East River Drive Krunchy, You wait till the 18" start pumpin this at ya :applaud:

Rich

rs237
02-21-2008, 09:07 AM
Chest Pounding Bass!
Dont know if we already have/had one of these threads (nothing came up on search?) but how about the Lowly BASS.
As always the bass player rarely gets much attention and without them the Groove just wouldnt sound the same.

Lets not limit it to Rock for Jazz has had some great talent as well -
and besides...We All Love Really Good Bass! :banana: :dancin:

I'll start, one of my favorites has always been Stanley Clarke (kind of obvious but what the hey!) more of a jazz fusion thing but his early stuff is really amazing. Has featured a lot of great guitar players to complement his style...Jeff Beck, Bill Connors and John McLaughlin to name a few. His more recent stuff is a little tame, his 70's stuff is the ticket ;)



Hello Krunchy,

Yes, I agree with you. I love him since 1975.

Regards
Juergen

Fred Sanford
02-21-2008, 09:37 AM
I'm gonna type this quick, and not check name spelling...these are influences & inspirations, very random styles.

Wilbur Bascombe
Geezer Butler
John Patitucci
Phil Chen
Larry Graham
Les Claypool
Sting
John Deacon
Geddy Lee
Norwood Fisher
Mike Watt
Stu Hamm
Paul McCartney
Graham Maby
John Paul Jones
Marcus Miller
John Entwistle
Victor Wooten
Lee Sklar
Dave Hope

...I'll kick myself later for forgetting others, but that's a start.

je

Ducatista47
02-21-2008, 10:13 AM
Electric, if those no longer with us count, Jaco Pastorius. Stand-up, Ron Carter.

Jaco needs no explanation.

Carter is capable of much more melodic soloing than his peers. He can do this partially because his intonation is better. His sense of swing and blue notes is unbelievable.

My new kid on the block award goes to Tal Wilkenfield.

Peter Washington with the Bill Charlap Trio is the best I have heard live in many, many years.

I have no qualifications to even hold an opinion on this other than having played the bass myself, pretty badly I would say.

Clark in Peoria

Harvey Gerst
02-21-2008, 11:29 AM
Jeff Berlin ain't too shabby either.

Oldmics
02-21-2008, 11:42 AM
I also want to nominate Jerry Peeks.

Played with the Steve Morse trio for awhile.

First bass player I ever saw who tastefully used a whammy bar.

Oldmics

diamondsouled
02-21-2008, 01:24 PM
For rock Glenn Hughes is awesome, can sing decently as well. For jazz-funk Jamaaladeen Tacuma.

http://www.glennhughes.com/

http://www.jazzdimensions.de/interviews/portraits/jamaaladeen_tacuma.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jamaaladeen_Tacuma

Lar

KromeDome
02-21-2008, 01:25 PM
Chuck Rainey
John Entwistle
Leland Sklar

Harvey Gerst
02-21-2008, 01:49 PM
And don't forget Abe Laborial.

greyhound
02-21-2008, 04:08 PM
jaco pastorius
les claypool

the discussion wich one of them is better continues to pop up every time me and my best friend get drunk:cheers:

i say Les he says Jaco:banghead:

oznob
02-21-2008, 04:24 PM
How about two Rock and Roll Hall of Famers?

Donald "Duck" Dunn

Jack Bruce

Jakob
02-21-2008, 06:20 PM
What about the late self-taught Bernard Edwards from Chic. His grooves are some of the worlds most sampled ones.

Louis Johnson (One of the Brothers Johnson. Played with Michael Jackson on "Thriller", "Off the wall" and "Dangerous" and with George Benson on the "Give me the night" album etc... Nicknamed Thunder Thumbs!

Steve Harris from Iron Maiden. Writes all their stuff.

Krunchy
02-21-2008, 06:32 PM
Very Cool! I knew there would be a lot of names that I was not aware of and hopefully that would be of interest to many of us as well.

If you guys get a chance could you recomend an album or two if you have the time to do so, that would be very helpful as well. Thank you!

Rich, i remember you or Andyoz (Heather too) talking about Tony Levin and I got my wife the peter gabriel dvd and the guy was pretty amazing.
I got East River Drive, there are some great songs in there but not the whole album like in the old days,
"when its cold outside" from Hideaway if pretty hot as well, too short, he could do a 15min jam on that one :D

JE, its interesting that you mentioned sting and paul McCartney in your list and rightly so, sting is a really talented player as is paul (super talented bastage :)), a lot of names Im not familiar with.

Oldmics
"First bass player I ever saw who tastefully used a whammy bar."
Now that is intersting, can you recommend an "album" that showcases this?

rs237, like the vinyl Stanley Clarke...nice!

Jeff Berlin, Jaco, Ron Carter, any particular cd's guys? Thanks! :bouncy:

dont forget Mr. Mingus!

podger076
02-21-2008, 06:41 PM
Fred Sanford pretty well summed up my list, and I would add Tal Wilkenfeld. Love her style!

Ducatista47
02-21-2008, 08:05 PM
and besides...We All Love Really Good Bass! :banana: :dancin:

Never were truer words uttered in the planet's history!

Did I miss it, or did no one mention Jamie (James Lee) Jamerson yet? He is the most sampled player on Earth, I think, and of course played on nearly all the Motown classic hits. How about it, guys, was Motown bass OK with you? :D

Right, Paul McCartney. He can be unbelievable when the muse strikes. And Tony Levin I too have heard live. One really talented dude. The Chapman Stick is one cool - whatever it is.

I'm a huge Chess Records & Chicago Blues fan, so how about Willie Dixon.

One of the more interesting bass players I heard was Jimmy Page. Yes, James Patrick Page of Surrey, England. When I saw the Yardbirds in Chicago, he was playing bass with the group. In interviews he said he was "having trouble sticking to a root thing." No lie. As Neil Young would say, he was all over the f***ing thing. I do not think this brief period made it onto vinyl, unfortunately.

One more - Stephen Stills, Captain Manyhands on the first CSN album. One of the best ever.

Krunchy, I have a particular Ron Carter album in mind but I have to dig up the title. Give me a day or two. Jaco, I don't know where to start, but his three or so cuts on Joni Mitchell's Hejira are a good place. The last track, Refuge Of The Roads, will show what for. And wait 'till you see Peter Washington! ;)

Lar, Ray Brown is a first ballot hall of famer, forgive the baseball reference. Solid and then some. If I were not so high on Ron Carter, he would be my number one jazz bassist.

Clark

diamondsouled
02-21-2008, 08:15 PM
Another solid bass player who was around from the start of the bebop era was Ray Brown.

Some sound clips here:

http://www.hopper-management.com/ray_brown.htm

Lar

Krunchy
02-21-2008, 09:20 PM
Did I miss it, or did no one mention Jamie (James Lee) Jamerson yet? He is the most sampled player on Earth, I think, and of course played on nearly all the Motown classic hits. How about it, guys, was Motown bass OK with you? :D
One of the more interesting bass players I heard was Jimmy Page. Yes, James Patrick Page of Surrey, England.

One more - Stephen Stills, Captain Manyhands on the first CSN album. One of the best ever.

Krunchy, I have a particular Ron Carter album in mind but I have to dig up the title. Give me a day or two. Jaco, I don't know where to start, but his three or so cuts on Joni Mitchell's Hejira are a good place. The last track, Refuge Of The Roads, will show what for. And wait 'till you see Peter Washington! ;)Clark

Motown Bass?.... Damn Right! motown, funk, who cares as long as its SOLID & can LAY IT DOWN!!!
Jimmy Page? wow, I would love to just imagine that.
Peter Washington, will be seeing him at Basies coca-cola cafe in Lincoln Center in May, yes :bouncy: yes :bouncy: YES :bouncy: really looking forward to it but dont want to rush things :)
Got one of the Trio's cds and been listening to is, very nice! Read somewhere that the trio should be renamed for they are all very talented (as you mentioned in your original post) and its almost unfair to call it the Bill Charlap Trio. That drummer is so hot too, reminds me of art Blakey a little, not necessarily his style but something else, looks, aura, who knows.

This is off topic but, do you have any Fats Waller records? I love that guy, dont make em like that anymore.

Lar, its probably my computer but, I couldnt access the links, thank you though. :)

Skywave-Rider
02-21-2008, 10:13 PM
Krunchy,
I thought you'd say Tony Levin!

Let's see...
I like everybody, but for CHEST POUNDING I'll add
Jeff Magnum
John Entwistle
John Wetton

and I love
Carol Kaye

I just remembered that a few months ago I saw Bootsy Collins walking around on the street with a bass on his back wearing silver pants. That was cool.

Sorry, was supposed to pick one?

Ducatista47
02-21-2008, 10:39 PM
Tina Weymouth
John McVie
Charlie Hayden
Steve Swallow
Adam Clayton
Bootsy Collins
Rick Danko
Phil Lesh
Rick James
Carl Radle
Larry Graham

and how about
Bill Wyman
Roger Waters
Brian Wilson

Skywave-Rider
02-21-2008, 10:56 PM
Oh yeah, Brian Wilson, Rick Danko! Good ones Ducatista!
I didn't see Duck Dunn yet, did I?
Yes, Oznob got him!

stephane RAME
02-21-2008, 11:34 PM
New best young bassist :

http://www.talwilkenfeld.com/Tal.html

:applaud:

scott fitlin
02-22-2008, 12:35 AM
Chest Pounding Bass!
Dont know if we already have/had one of these threads (nothing came up on search?) but how about the Lowly BASS.
As always the bass player rarely gets much attention and without them the Groove just wouldnt sound the same.

Lets not limit it to Rock for Jazz has had some great talent as well -
and besides...We All Love Really Good Bass! :banana: :dancin:

I'll start, one of my favorites has always been Stanley Clarke (kind of obvious but what the hey!) more of a jazz fusion thing but his early stuff is really amazing. Has featured a lot of great guitar players to complement his style...Jeff Beck, Bill Connors and John McLaughlin to name a few. His more recent stuff is a little tame, his 70's stuff is the ticket ;)



http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/513I0IIlILL._SS500_.jpgI agree, Stanley Clarke - Lopsy Lu is a favorite of mine.

Bass playing made for JBL,s BIG WOOFERS!

greyhound
02-22-2008, 01:53 AM
Very Cool! I knew there would be a lot of names that I was not aware of and hopefully that would be of interest to many of us as well.

If you guys get a chance could you recomend an album or two if you have the time to do so, that would be very helpful as well. Thank you!

Rich, i remember you or Andyoz (Heather too) talking about Tony Levin and I got my wife the peter gabriel dvd and the guy was pretty amazing.
I got East River Drive, there are some great songs in there but not the whole album like in the old days,
"when its cold outside" from Hideaway if pretty hot as well, too short, he could do a 15min jam on that one :D

JE, its interesting that you mentioned sting and paul McCartney in your list and rightly so, sting is a really talented player as is paul (super talented bastage :)), a lot of names Im not familiar with.

Oldmics
"First bass player I ever saw who tastefully used a whammy bar."
Now that is intersting, can you recommend an "album" that showcases this?

rs237, like the vinyl Stanley Clarke...nice!

Jeff Berlin, Jaco, Ron Carter, any particular cd's guys? Thanks! :bouncy:

dont forget Mr. Mingus!


i can only recomend "sailing the seas of cheese"by primus.
les claypool on bass. nicely recorded ,their style is a little freaky though.

greyhound
02-22-2008, 01:55 AM
Tina Weymouth
John McVie
Charlie Hayden
Steve Swallow
Adam Clayton
Bootsy Collins
Rick Danko
Phil Lesh
Rick James
Carl Radle
Larry Graham

and how about
Bill Wyman
Roger Waters
Brian Wilson


do you realy think these are great bass players or are you just summing up a lot of bass players;)

Fred Sanford
02-22-2008, 04:56 AM
Very Cool! I knew there would be a lot of names that I was not aware of and hopefully that would be of interest to many of us as well.

If you guys get a chance could you recomend an album or two if you have the time to do so, that would be very helpful as well. Thank you!

JE, its interesting that you mentioned sting and paul McCartney in your list and rightly so, sting is a really talented player as is paul (super talented bastage :)), a lot of names Im not familiar with.


I'll go back and add info to my old post as I have time.

+1 on Bernard Edwards, forgot him...there's a YouTube vid of him talking about the Power Station bassline for Bang A Gong, the first second you hear him start to play the groove or the solo, you know you can't touch that guy's technique. This is similar, but not the one I'm thinking of:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=14kXaX5D6Ng

je

Fred Sanford
02-22-2008, 06:08 AM
Wilbur Bascomb – played on the movie soundtrack of “Hair”, paired with drummer Bernie Purdie. Really worth a listen. Also played with Jeff Beck, James Brown, etc.

Geezer Butler – Black Sabbath

John Patitucci – lots of session work, electric and upright. I went looking for “who played THAT?!?” on some Was (not Was) and Bonnie Raitt tunes, but he’s all over the place.

Phil Chen – White City album, right? I first noticed him on “Star Fleet”, the Brian May/Eddie Van Halen project.

Larry Graham – Sly & the Family Stone. It’s tons of fun to watch and hear him on Prince’s Rave Unto the Year 2000 DVD, he’s just obviously having a ball.

Les Claypool – Primus

Sting – Police & solo

John Deacon - Queen

Geddy Lee - Rush

Norwood Fisher – Fishbone, other projects

Mike Watt – Minutemen, Ed from Ohio

Stu Hamm – Satriani, solo albums

Paul McCartney – who?

Graham Maby – Joe Jackson, other projects

John Paul Jones – Led Zeppelin & other projects

Marcus Miller – Bob James/David Sanborn album Double Vision introduced me, he’s on tons of other projects & solo stuff- always well-recorded, too.

John Entwistle – Who?

Victor Wooten – Bela Fleck & other projects

Lee Sklar – James Taylor and a gazillion other sessions. Can’t miss him on stage, nobody looks like him.

Dave Hope – earlier Kansas albums.

...and I'd forgotten Carl Radle, on the early Eric Clapton albums.

je

pelly3s
02-22-2008, 06:21 AM
I dont think anyone had mentioned Rocco Prestias from Tower of Power. Gotta give it up to Flea from the Red Hot Chili Peppers too. Jeff Pilson also ends up in my top list.

hjames
02-22-2008, 06:26 AM
What about Bootsy Collins? His playing leaps out at you on the late 60s-early 70s James Brown albums, and there was a lot of interesting beats on the P-Funk and Bootsy's RubberBand albums afterwards. Emma thinks Prince owes a lot of his style to Bootsy!

If you don't have it already (and why not??) check out -
http://www.amazon.com/Love-Power-Peace-James-Brown/dp/B000001DWX
Its a must-have live album from the Olympia in Paris, circa 1971 - apparently the only recording with Bootsy and the original JBs.

Krunchy
02-22-2008, 08:08 AM
Great list! enough there to keep one busy for a year at least. I know I'll be looking to get some of this stuff on cd in the near future.

Will add one more myself, Paul Denman, bass player on Sade's band, this guy and the guitar player Stewart Mathewman complement perfectly Sade's vocals. Both are very understated but man, some of those grooves are sooo friken good.

I was going to add Flea as well but pelly3s beat me to it.

How about Michael Anthony from Van Halen ......Nah! he's lucky he hooked up with those guys when he did :D

Skywave, "I didn't see Duck Dunn yet, did I?" was mentioned earlier. Tony Levin already came up and I myself am not that familiar with him but he is definitely a formidable player from the little that I've heard/seen so far.

johnaec
02-22-2008, 08:26 AM
My favorite, (and I'm a bass player), is Kenny Gradney of "Little Feat", (he also played with Frank Zappa for a while). His playing doesn't come through on recordings that much, but live, he's a killer! He can also play "slap" bass with the best of them!

John

oznob
02-22-2008, 08:34 AM
My favorite, (and I'm a bass player), is Kenny Gradney of "Little Feat", (he also played with Frank Zappa for a while). His playing doesn't come through on recordings that much, but live, he's a killer! He can also play "slap" bass with the best of them!

John

Great call on Kenny Gradney John. "Spanish Moon" is one of my favorite Little Feat songs and has a great bass line. He plays it masterfully!

whizzer
02-22-2008, 10:00 AM
Ron Wood has specialized in lead and rhythm guitar, but check out his syncopated bass on "Street Fighting Man" on Rod Stewart's first solo album.

Ducatista47
02-22-2008, 10:22 AM
do you realy think these are great bass players or are you just summing up a lot of bass players;)
I think they are great. When a band is great, or at least has a great groove, the bass player is usually a large part of the reason. With the drummer the bass player is the rhythm section, after all.

Tina Weymouth - See the "Old Grey Whistle Test" appearance playing Psycho Killer

Charlie Hayden, Bootsy Collins, Larry Graham - all innovators of the highest order. Hear Charlie Hayden pioneering free jazz with Ornette Coleman

Steve Swallow is a first class jazz player who, like Hayden, can play anything well and most things much better than well. He defines the modern era in many ways and is all over its history.

John McVie - from John Mayall to Peter Green's FM to later, smooth Fleetwood Mac (he is the Mac), a really excellent bass player

Rick James - maybe you have never heard Super Freak

Phil Lesh - get past Jerry Garcia and hear a really awesome bass player. Stephen Stills wanted to be the Gratefull Dead's bass man, but as he said they already had Phil Lesh.

Adam Clayton, Rick Danko, Carl Radle, Brian Wilson, Roger Waters - they are not flashy and make it look so easy, no one noticed their playing. All great players in their roles.

Bill Wyman - a really special talent, completely ignored. The only Rolling Stone beside Brian and Charlie who could hear swing. The Stones sounded like the Stones because of him. By playing a tiny bit late, he imparted a real sense of time and rhythm, propelling the tunes in a really unique way. It is the usually undefined x-factor that gave classic Stones songs their sound, that sort of dragging yet pulling like a freight train feel.

I mentioned Tal Wilkenfield on the first page, but I must have buried it in senseless prose. Which I was trying to avoid by just making a list. I never seem to get it right. :blink:

Clark

greyhound
02-22-2008, 10:27 AM
clifford lee burton
known simply as cliff burton. metallica's first bass player and one of the best in the metal scene.
his solo on the kill em all LP is legendary.

Tim Rinkerman
02-22-2008, 02:21 PM
Jaco Pastorius is hands down my all time favorite, a fabulous musician that just happened to speak through the bass, but on a different bent, I just cannot believe no one has mentioned Mark King from Level 42...he's the absolute master of slap and funk, you won't (can't) believe he's a white english guy...Google Level 42, or Mark King and be prepared to be amazed..(if you're into that style..)the icing on the cake is he does all the lead vocals. Singing and playing in different time signatures...he has never ceased to amaze me...Tim

greyhound
02-23-2008, 02:46 AM
Jaco Pastorius is hands down my all time favorite, a fabulous musician that just happened to speak through the bass, but on a different bent, I just cannot believe no one has mentioned Mark King from Level 42...he's the absolute master of slap and funk, you won't (can't) believe he's a white english guy...Google Level 42, or Mark King and be prepared to be amazed..(if you're into that style..)the icing on the cake is he does all the lead vocals. Singing and playing in different time signatures...he has never ceased to amaze me...Tim

if Les Claypool was already mentioned why bother to talk about mark king ;)
Les is the king of slap and he sings to.

greyhound
02-23-2008, 02:53 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P0EmTvgUILQ


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xAkvBqp8R8E


les in action:applaud:

Hofmannhp
02-23-2008, 10:21 AM
I vote for:

Jack Bruce (Cream) try the title "Crossroads" and you know what I mean
Gary McAvoy (Rory Gallagher)
John Entwisle (Who)

HP

Ducatista47
02-24-2008, 12:54 AM
Krunchy, I have a particular Ron Carter album in mind but I have to dig up the title. Give me a day or two.

I'm afraid this album may be hard to find. It is a 1977 Japanese vinyl release. My local Audio shop carries such records, so I am lucky in that regard. It is The Great Jazz Trio At The Village Vanguard Vol. 2, East Wind label 15PJ-1016. How's that for obscure? Hank Jones, piano. Ron Carter, bass. Tony Williams, drums.

You Asked about Fats Waller. I have two LP's I bought last year at the WGLT music sale, but I haven't listened to them yet. I'll try to rectify that and report. The Complete Fats Waller VOl. 1 1934-1935 Bluebird/RCA and Fats Waller Plays And Sings Jazztone J1247.

I just realized why people keep listing names I already mentioned. I must be on a lot of ignore lists! :hmm: Rambling old fart that I am, if I were not me and I used ignore lists, I would probably be on mine. :D

Enjoy your new blue faced toys,

Clark

hjames
02-24-2008, 07:04 AM
I just realized why people keep listing names I already mentioned. I must be on a lot of ignore lists! :hmm: Rambling old fart that I am, if I were not me and I used ignore lists, I would probably be on mine. :D
Clark

Thats not it at all, you pop up some great stuff to find!
I just figure a lot of folks drop in a thread and just read the top page -and have no idea what was said in the 20 pages that preceded it.

Besides, you're not rambling, you're eclectic!! :applaud:

Ducatista47
02-24-2008, 10:34 AM
Gosh, shucks, Heather... Thank you so much. But I am really an old fart.

I don't take any offense at repeat listings of music people like. It is so nice to know that it is not a case of some old guy - "the one down the street with the speakers and the strange tube thingies" - being the only fan of an otherwise forgotten or overlooked talent. Threads like this make me feel good all over when I have heard of the artists, and when I haven't. It's all about the music, after all. There is nothing sadder than a great rig and nothing to play on it, except perhaps having no one to share our discoveries with.

I'm not having much luck finding out more about Harvey's man, Abe Laborial. I am locating more information about his son, who plays drums very well I guess.

Clark

greyhound
02-24-2008, 03:08 PM
I'm afraid this album may be hard to find. It is a 1977 Japanese vinyl release. My local Audio shop carries such records, so I am lucky in that regard. It is The Great Jazz Trio At The Village Vanguard Vol. 2, East Wind label 15PJ-1016. How's that for obscure? Hank Jones, piano. Ron Carter, bass. Tony Williams, drums.

You Asked about Fats Waller. I have two LP's I bought last year at the WGLT music sale, but I haven't listened to them yet. I'll try to rectify that and report. The Complete Fats Waller VOl. 1 1934-1935 Bluebird/RCA and Fats Waller Plays And Sings Jazztone J1247.

I just realized why people keep listing names I already mentioned. I must be on a lot of ignore lists! :hmm: Rambling old fart that I am, if I were not me and I used ignore lists, I would probably be on mine. :D

Enjoy your new blue faced toys,

Clark

well ive tried but you seem te ignore my ignore list:D
i always wondered what a "rambling old fart" would sound like.

Ducatista47
02-24-2008, 05:28 PM
[quote=greyhound;202019]
i always wondered what a "rambling old fart" would sound like.

I am not sure I want to know myself, but a rambling old fart's fart would sound better on JBL's or Altecs, I'm sure. Best bass speakers on Earth, as we all know. This is a category of bass players that remains largely unrecorded, but live performances abound and are usually free of charge.

The Wavehounds Fart Machine software is sadly no longer available, but it did sound great on 4345's when it was.

Life is such a gas, man...Clark

Steve K
02-24-2008, 10:36 PM
It can't get any simpler than this! Piano and bass. Wonderful improv by the two masters. Great recording, too.

greyhound
02-25-2008, 05:16 AM
It can't get any simpler than this! Piano and bass. Wonderful improv by the two masters. Great recording, too.


damn i forgot about this one.
will make a note of it so i wont forget to buy that.
thnx

@ clark
youre right. a fart will definitly sound better on jbl ore altec.
i listen to a lot of audiophile sets over here in the lowlands.
the trend however is to reduce the diameter of the bass drivers.
One of the reasons i love jbl so much is the big ass woofers with a huge magnetic field wich make bass sound very naturally. at least thats my opinion.

pargon
02-25-2008, 05:18 AM
Jaco Pastorius
Leland Sklarr
Mingus
Ron Brown
John Entwhistle
Jack Cassidy
Phil Lesh

Krunchy
02-25-2008, 06:37 AM
I'm afraid this album may be hard to find. It is a 1977 Japanese vinyl release. My local Audio shop carries such records, so I am lucky in that regard. It is The Great Jazz Trio At The Village Vanguard Vol. 2, East Wind label 15PJ-1016. How's that for obscure? Hank Jones, piano. Ron Carter, bass. Tony Williams, drums.I just realized why people keep listing names I already mentioned.
if I were not me and I used ignore lists, I would probably be on mine. :D
Enjoy your new blue faced toys,
Clark

Hi Clark!

This list is getting really good, thank you for digging through your archives, I appreciate it. I found something on amazon but it doesnt list much about it, do the track listings ring a bell.....
http://www.amazon.com/Great-Jazz-Trio-Village-Vanguard/dp/B000056UXN/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1203945331&sr=1-2

I am curious about this album with all that you've said and now Tony Willimas on it, last I heard of him was when he was quite young playing with Miles, this is worth searching out. Thank you for your time!
As far as repeat posts I have to agree with Heather's assesment for I am guilty of the same, sometimes I just stumble into a thread and bounce around its pages especially if its a large thread, there is just so much information/knowledge here :)

Been trying to enjoy the new toys, but I think Bo summed it up perfectly, "so much gear so little time" (excuse if misquoting).

Steve K,
Duke Ellington & Ray Brown, thats got to be simply beautiful, thank you for the suggestion!

Almost forgot... do you guys remember the Barney Miller tv show from the 70's, am I off targer here or did that have a great musical intro real funky with great bass and equally great guitar, I always wanted to hear more of it. Does anyone know any more about this? I know Larry Carlton did a lot of stuff for tv.

hjames
02-25-2008, 07:03 AM
Hi Clark!

Steve K,
Duke Ellington & Ray Brown, thats got to be simply beautiful, thank you for the suggestion!

Almost forgot... do you guys remember the Barney Miller tv show from the 70's, am I off targer here or did that have a great musical intro real funky with great bass and equally great guitar, I always wanted to hear more of it. Does anyone know any more about this? I know Larry Carlton did a lot of stuff for tv.
Yep, I just ordered that Basie CD myself! Thanks, SteveK!
Plus Joni Mitchell's "Don Juan's Reckless Daughter" -
I'd heard that was some of Jaco's better work with her ...

I drove in today listening to some Eberhard Weber - from "Stages of a Long Journey" -
I used to enjoy his stuff in the past but somehow I lost touch ... very nice!

EDIT: I found the quote about Jaco on the Joni Mitchell albums - wikipedia bio on Jaco -
"During the course of his musical career, Pastorius played on dozens of recording sessions for other musicians, both in and out of jazz circles. Some of his most notable are four highly regarded albums with acclaimed singer/songwriter Joni Mitchell (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joni_Mitchell): Hejira (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hejira_%28album%29) (1976), Don Juan's Reckless Daughter (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Don_Juan%27s_Reckless_Daughter) (1977), Mingus (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mingus_%28album%29) (1979) and the live album Shadows and Light (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shadows_and_Light) (1980). His influence was most dominant on Hejira (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hejira_%28album%29), and many of the songs on that album seem to be composed using the bass as a melodic source of inspiration."

I ordered "Don Juan's Reckless Daughter" this morning as I already own the other 3 - and the DVD of Shadows and Light !

Ducatista47
02-25-2008, 07:29 AM
This list is getting really good, thank you for digging through your archives, I appreciate it. I found something on amazon but it doesnt list much about it, do the track listings ring a bell.....
http://www.amazon.com/Great-Jazz-Trio-Village-Vanguard/dp/B000056UXN/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1203945331&sr=1-2

I am curious about this album with all that you've said and now Tony Williams on it, last I heard of him was when he was quite young playing with Miles, this is worth searching out. Thank you for your time!

I'll be damned, that is it. Same cover even. I hope it is a Japanese (virgin) Vinyl pressing. When you get it you can tell by holding it up to a light. You will be able to see through it. The fidelity of these pressings is unbelievable.

No problem on the research. Thank you for this thread! It is proving to be a gold mine for anyone willing to read it. I can always "suffer" through someone helping me rediscover my own collection.

I'm a huge Barney Miller fan. I will try and find out who that was.

Clark

Krunchy
02-25-2008, 07:50 AM
Hi Clark, unfortuantely its a cd, not vivyl :(, there are some good record stores in the city I am sure but its just having the time to go there and rummage that keeps me going back to amazon. Gonna give it a whirl anyway :)

edgewound
02-25-2008, 09:52 AM
Wolfgang Van Halen

Ducatista47
02-25-2008, 10:22 AM
Hi Clark, unfortuantely its a cd, not vivyl :(, there are some good record stores in the city I am sure but its just having the time to go there and rummage that keeps me going back to amazon. Gonna give it a whirl anyway :)

My Alzheimers moment for the day. Of course a recent issue remaster would be a CD. :o: Don't worry, CDs with the sash in Japanese - an Obi - are usually very high quality. If you do ever see any Japanese vinyl you like for a good price, jump right in. This CD should be a nice addition to your music library.

Many USA remasters stink. They are compressed to hell and are often worse than the original CD. Take the obi to be a Good Housekeeping seal of approval generally.

Speaking of Alzheimers, how did I forget Eberhard Weber? A staple of the ECM house band as well as a leader. An all time favorite of mine:
http://www.ecmrecords.com/Catalogue/ECM/1000/1060.php?cat=%2FArtists%2FTowner+Ralph%23%23Ralph+ Towner&we_start=32&lvredir=712
A follow up CD, much darker and more somber :http://www.ecmrecords.com/Catalogue/ECM/1000/1095.php?lvredir=712&catid=0&doctype=Catalogue&order=releasedate&we_search=%2Bsound+%2Band+%2Bshadow&rubchooser=901&mainrubchooser=9

Clark

whizzer
02-25-2008, 11:10 AM
Just about everyone on my short list (Headed by Jaco Pastorious and Stanley Clark) has already been named and/or listed. I've seen Yes listed frequently on the thread having to do with bands people hate, and I have to admit, Anderson's voice drives me up a wall, and I own no Yes albums; however, because of circumstances beyond my control, I did see a live Yes concert back in either 1979 or 1980, and I have to say that Chris Squire is one of the best I've actually seen perform. He played every part of the instrument.

Krunchy
02-25-2008, 11:16 AM
Hi Clark, I jumped the gun a bit and ordered it prior to your last post, not the import version but not a remaster either, got it for 10 bucks so I figured I'd take a gamble. Picked up the Ellington & Ray Brown, I love the Duke, one of his last recordings (not the last) also took a shot at the Joni Mitchel album you recommended, its a nice start, thanks again.
I know I'll be checking this list from time to time and slowly make my way through it, will check the library as well, they come through with obscure/non main stream stuff from time to time.

Whizzer I believe it, as per the buffalo 66 reference on that thread, that bass was wild, I would love to hear more in same vein. Sometimes circumstances out of our control are not a bad thing ;)

We are on a Roll! no kidding, I think it would take me a year to sample the material that has been listed so far. :applaud:


BARNEY MILLER theme song (quality not so great but its just funny hearing that after many years....

http://www.sitcomsonline.com/sounds/barneymillerclosingthemewith4dproductionsmusicbedt ag.wav

Someone should redo a version of it and really go to town on it!

JSF13
02-25-2008, 12:07 PM
A lot of great names there.

A few I didn't see.

Leroy Vinnegar-deceased.West coast walking bass fame.ie Shelley Manne,etc.

Eddie Gomez-(Bill Evans,Chick Corea,Miles Davis,Wayne Shorter,Steve Gadd,etc.)

Nathan East-(Fourplay)

Gary Willis-(Tribal Tech)

Christian Mcbride

Jimmy Haslip-(Yellowjackets)

greyhound
02-25-2008, 02:01 PM
Just about everyone on my short list (Headed by Jaco Pastorious and Stanley Clark) has already been named and/or listed. I've seen Yes listed frequently on the thread having to do with bands people hate, and I have to admit, Anderson's voice drives me up a wall, and I own no Yes albums; however, because of circumstances beyond my control, I did see a live Yes concert back in either 1979 or 1980, and I have to say that Chris Squire is one of the best I've actually seen perform. He played every part of the instrument.


yes WAS a great band before "owner of..."
gates of betrayl (dont know how to spell it) is great.

pelly3s
02-25-2008, 06:33 PM
I didnt see anyone list him but what about Mike Porcaro from Toto, and before him David Hungate.

MJ Bing
02-25-2008, 09:37 PM
Let us not forget

Paul Chambers

:D

DCHAMBERS58
02-27-2008, 06:33 PM
GREAT BASS LESH FILLING

JSF13
02-28-2008, 06:13 AM
Nice Christian McBride solo.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VJbp6VqtXzQ

Krunchy
02-29-2008, 07:23 PM
Got this album yesterday and had a chance to listen to it a bit today.....fantastic! I can see why Ron Carter is held in high regard. the whole cd is really good, its hard to beat a really good trio when it comes to jazz, all the players are very talented. some great numbers in there ,I just wish it was longer. Will probably look into the other volumes, should probably be of equal quality/caliber.

Thank you much! :)

Krunchy
03-02-2008, 12:22 PM
I was just listening to Stanley Clarke's self titled album (1974) and was just looking at the liner notes and I noticed right there, on drums...Tony Williams, is this the same Tony Williams that played with Miles & on the previous post (the great jazz trio) ???? Havent looked inside this album in a long long time.

Thanks

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51vGro%2BDpqL._SS500_.jpg

hjames
03-02-2008, 01:10 PM
That'd be the same one ...


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tony_Williams

Anthony Tillmon "Tony" Williams (December 12 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/December_12), 1945 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1945) – February 23 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/February_23), 1997 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1997)) was an American (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States) jazz drummer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jazz_drumming)
Tony Williams Lifetime

In 1969, he formed a trio, "The Tony Williams Lifetime (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Tony_Williams_Lifetime)," with John McLaughlin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_McLaughlin_%28musician%29) on guitar, and Larry Young (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larry_Young_%28jazz%29) on organ. Jack Bruce (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Bruce) on bass was added later. It was a pioneering band of the fusion movement (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jazz-rock_fusion), a combination of rock, R&B, and jazz. Their first album, Emergency!, was largely rejected by the jazz community at the time of its release. Nowadays, Emergency! is considered by many to be a fusion classic.


After McLaughlin's departure, and several more albums, Lifetime disbanded. In 1975, Williams put together a band he called "The New Tony Williams Lifetime," featuring bassist Tony Newton, pianist Alan Pasqua (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Pasqua), and English guitarist Allan Holdsworth (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allan_Holdsworth), which recorded two albums for Columbia Records, Believe It and Million Dollar Legs respectively.


=======
for what its worth, I saw the 2nd Lifetime band at a little DC pub called The Childe Harold years ago ...



I was just listening to Stanley Clarke's self titled album (1974) and was just looking at the liner notes and I noticed right there, on drums...Tony Williams, is this the same Tony Williams that played with Miles & on the previous post (the great jazz trio) ???? Havent looked inside this album in a long long time.

Thanks

Krunchy
03-02-2008, 02:00 PM
Thank you Heather, that was very informative, you learn something new every day. Have you heard the Emergency! album & if so what did you think of it. How was their second incarnation when you saw them live?
BTW that Mothership album is pretty wild stuff, would have never thougt of checking it out if you hadnt talked about it, Thanks ;)

Fred Sanford
03-04-2008, 05:02 AM
Thank you Heather, that was very informative, you learn something new every day. Have you heard the Emergency! album & if so what did you think of it. How was their second incarnation when you saw them live?
BTW that Mothership album is pretty wild stuff, would have never thougt of checking it out if you hadnt talked about it, Thanks ;)

It's all your fault- it was ~70 degrees here yesterday, so I let the dogs out & opened up all the windows & worked out in the garage with a couple L110s cranking Tony Williams "Lifetime: The Collection" (includes albums "Believe It" and "Million Dollar Legs") & "Ultimate Tony Williams".

The song "Joy-Filled Summer" is what got me to first seek out Tony Williams years ago. I had heard that and Cozy Powell's "Over The Top" in the same day, and remember writing the names & titles on my arm with a pen so I wouldn't forget them...

Hey thanks,

je

Krunchy
03-04-2008, 07:40 PM
I'll take responsibility....along with everyone else here :D
I should be thanking you and everyone who shared some of their favs with us.
The greatest stereos and speakers mean nothing without some good music to play on them.
There are many great suggestions in this and other threads relating to the incredibly varied styles of music waiting to be explored. That is exciting!
Zilch's suggestion (just to name one) of Michael Hedges on the You Tube thread is a prime example. Maybe not everyone will like it but at least you were exposed to it and may find something new that you trully like....something that you will never hear on the sorry radio stations that seem so prevalent these days. Sorry for the flare up there :D

All of this broadens our horizons & goes a long way to helping us enjoy our passion for music, played through our favorite speakers of course. I just wish I had more time to explore, there is so much music available to us, more than at any other time in the history of mankind, pretty incredible really.

Thank you all!

Hope you gave the L110's a good workout as well. 70 degrees, just makes it feel like winter's over.


It's all your fault-
The song "Joy-Filled Summer" is what got me to first seek out Tony Williams years ago. I had heard that and Cozy Powell's "Over The Top" in the same day, and remember writing the names & titles on my arm with a pen so I wouldn't forget them...je

:rotfl: If there's no writing material an arm will do in a jam.

Fred Sanford
03-04-2008, 08:34 PM
:rotfl: If there's no writing material an arm will do in a jam.

It was '88, and I was maybe 23, probably working on some gazillionaire's stereo system when CD 101.9 started playing instrumental jazz. Had to try to remember what the artists & songs were somehow...you'd think I'd be carrying a note pad or something, right? Good thing it wasn't a Sharpie, I'd still have the tattoo.

Bought Spyro Gyra's Morning Dance around then, to demo The Donald's system to him, it was my first CD purchase ever! That, plus Vivaldi/Four Seasons and Handel/Water Music. Weird how you remember stuff like that. My company had sold him a Pioneer PD-M6 mounted nearly VERTICALLY, I had to test it to see if it would work as "designed"! Knuckleheads...

je

chilledspode
03-05-2008, 11:21 AM
I always thought Tommy Shannon (SRV bass player) could play - but I am out of my element here....:D

Mark

JSF13
03-06-2008, 03:08 PM
Not sure if I saw Anthony Jackson mentioned. Another GREAT bass player.:)

Fred Sanford
03-06-2008, 07:34 PM
Chuck Rainey. Some samples on his site:

http://www.chuckrainey.com/

je

Ducatista47
04-30-2008, 12:28 AM
Forgive me if this guy has already been mentioned, but if you like stand up bass, try Niels Henning Orsted-Pedersen. I see him in the Video of the Jazzbaltica 2003 Konzert fur Ray Brown. A very melodic player.

Don't miss Michael Brecker playing solo pieces and looking back during some breaks grooving to Ray Brown, who of course being dead was not really there. One of the great moments in Jazz.

Clark

3dbdown
05-05-2008, 01:04 PM
Haven't seen these guys on the thresd....

James Jamerson...........Early Motown
Bob Babbitt.................Late-Era Motown
Timothy B. Schmidt......Eagles

And that young girl playing with Jeff Beck on Crossroads Guitar Tour

Tim Bogert.......Beck, Bogert,Appice


Rick

indycraft
05-06-2008, 10:20 AM
Peter Cetera.......on the early chicago albums. I particularly enjoy his performance on "Intoduction" from their first album. That song also has my favorite Terry Kath guitar solo.

toddalin
05-06-2008, 10:42 AM
I don't know if they've been mentioned but Hayward, Pinder, and Lodge all played bass on various cuts for the Moody Blues and these guys really work out their fingers. :applaud:

The Moody Blues is one band where the bass actually gets some of the best "melody" lines that make the song instantantly recognizable. :D

Robh3606
05-07-2008, 01:22 PM
I didn't see Tony Levin listed at all. He plays with Peter Gabriel and King Crimson among others. You also have Victor Wooton with Bella Fleck.

Rob:)

JSF13
07-30-2008, 03:34 PM
Didn't check the whole thread to see if Richard Bona was mentioned but if not definitely worth looking into

Tom Brennan
08-07-2008, 05:03 PM
Bill Black
Dunn
Jamerson
Bob Mosley
Noel Redding
McCartney
Phil Lynott http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4xr3O6Yz3mQ
The guy in Budgie
Whoever in the Hell that guy was in the Human Beinz.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nxtJoGdujYo&feature=related

Benatti
08-17-2008, 01:52 PM
- Bill Laswell
- Chris Square
- Jack Bruce
- Jah Wobble
- Marcus Miller

James Benatti Lansing :)

Ducatista47
04-11-2009, 12:10 PM
One of the more interesting bass players I heard was Jimmy Page. Yes, James Patrick Page of Surrey, England. When I saw the Yardbirds in Chicago, he was playing bass with the group. In interviews he said he was "having trouble sticking to a root thing." No lie. As Neil Young would say, he was all over the f***ing thing. I do not think this brief period made it onto vinyl, unfortunately.

Here it is. Not great quality, but Page playing bass with the Yardbirds. France, 1966.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EOheWvkjq78&NR=1

Here too, but not live.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kc0D-s0zTI4&feature=related

Related, Page with a Telecaster in "The New Yardbirds," his brief stint on bass over.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hPfpUv4hUOw&feature=related

Clark

stephane RAME
04-12-2009, 05:08 AM
A very good bass players recording SMV Thunder

with
Stanley Clarke
Marcus Miller
Victor WOODEN

Stéphane :)

Titanium Dome
04-12-2009, 05:25 AM
A very good bass players recording SMV Thunder

with
Stanley Clarke
Marcus Miller
Victor WOODEN

Stéphane :)


Those are great pictures. Thanks for showing the whole thing.

4313B
04-12-2009, 07:59 AM
Speaking of YouTube and bass players, I've been looking over this guy's posts. He has 126 posts, he had more but some were yanked.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lS7dfbgORFc

He also does keyboards.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0s5l4zmRAgE&feature=channel

stephane RAME
04-12-2009, 09:15 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cBKJrgdn8oQ&feature=PlayList&p=87B33F3299D6A697&index=0&playnext=1

Stéphane :applaud::applaud::applaud:

whizzer
04-13-2009, 06:20 AM
My vote goes to, in a split decision, Tony Levin. Chris Squire, Stanley Clarke, and on the basis of his bass efforts on Rod Stewart's first solo album, Ron Wood. Wood's syncopation on the breaks in Stewart's version of "Street Fightin' Man" is amazing. Jaco Pastorius probably ought to go on the list for his sheer virtuosity, but I never found the power in his playing that these other guys have always demonstrated, particularly Levin. He knows how to hit the beat, even if it's a very strange one. And of course, when it comes to the poppier version of rock and roll, Paul McCartney is peerless, but on anything heavier, his instrumental ability is clearly outshown by Levin, Squire, and, surprisingly, perhaps, by Clarke, who really injected some real, raw, rock-type power into Chick Corea's compositions.

JeffW
04-13-2009, 08:13 AM
A very good bass players recording SMV Thunder



with
Stanley Clarke
Marcus Miller
Victor WOODEN


Stéphane :)


I own that CD and have also recommended it to others here. I particularly like track 3.

As for jazz bassists, another good one is Ralphe Armstrong. He started out with The Mahavishnu Orchestra at 17 (having beat out Jaco Pastorius for the spot) and then on to play with Jean-Luc Ponty.

jcrobso
04-13-2009, 03:21 PM
Leo Fender had a hard time at first selling his electric bass.
The first bass player I listened to was Joe Osborn a west coast sessions player. He played with Ricky Nelson, Mom's & the Papa's, The Fifth Dimension, etc.
My first bass was a 1961 Fender Jazz base. The bass has slowly transform from rhythm supporting instrument to a lead instrument.

Tom Brennan
04-14-2009, 03:56 AM
The bass has slowly transform from rhythm supporting instrument to a lead instrument.

That's too bad. Some bassplayers ought'a take up the piano and stop punishing the bass.

jcrobso
04-14-2009, 12:05 PM
That way it would still be a back ground instrument and only lonely cow boys would use them. John

hjames
04-14-2009, 12:22 PM
Maybe Les Paul should have not invented the electric guitar.
That way it would still be a back ground instrument and only lonely cowboys would use them. John

All hat and no cattle?


Nah, god bless Jaco and Tony Levin and Victor Wooten and all those folks who dare to play melodious lines on their basses!
:applaud:
Sheesh - I'm guessing a Chapman Stick (http://www.stick.com/) would Blow his MIND!

http://www.stick.com/features/artist/steve_a_frontpage.jpg

Tom Brennan
04-14-2009, 07:46 PM
All hat and no cattle?


Nah, god bless Jaco and Tony Levin and Victor Wooten and all those folks who dare to play melodious lines on their basses!
:applaud:
Sheesh - I'm guessing a Chapman Stick (http://www.stick.com/) would Blow his MIND!

http://www.stick.com/features/artist/steve_a_frontpage.jpg


32 years ago I played in a punk band with a bassist who played one of those sticks. But we didn't let him use it in the band.

Tom Brennan
04-14-2009, 07:55 PM
That way it would still be a back ground instrument and only lonely cow boys would use them. John

That would be aces with me. If a guy wants to step out front he should use a suitable instrument---sax, piano or something like that. Drummers and bassists shouldn't draw attention to themselves, they should serve the song. Somebody has to supply the drive, if the drummer and bassist are noodling who's gonna do it?

Sometimes the one can noodle if the other holds steady, like in the Jimi Hendrix Experience when Redding's simple and driving playing allowed Mitichell to wander around. But Mitchell knew when to come back and he came back right on the money.

Ducatista47
04-14-2009, 10:01 PM
I used to always feel that way, Tom. But over the years I have run across a mitigating circumstance enough times to make exceptions.

Jaco Pastorius on "Refuge Of The Roads" on Joni Mitchell's Hejira. He was far and away the most talented instrumentalist on the session, a genius really, so why not let him play the lead lines? Why not indeed. Some of the most haunting music ever recorded.

Big Country. Two really good guitarists, one a great vocalist. But the most talented were the rhythm section, two ex studio musicians. Hear them play back and forth with each other and the rest of the band on "Wonderland." The more times you hear this song, the more you realize how they dominated this band. The most memorable passages were bass or drums, or both together but still without the rest of the band. It was not a secret at the time. Everyone wanted them.

The Dead. Sometimes Phil Lesh put forth such awesome lines he became the lead without even trying. He went way beyond blending in. He was that good, so no one could accuse him of overplaying. Stephen Stills (think of his bass playing on the first CSN album, WOW) remarked that he would like to be the bass player in the Grateful Dead, but it was hopeless. They already had Lesh.

Again and again I hear it in local Jazz groups. If a drummer and/or bass player are the best musicians in the band, it just does not make sense to hide them under a bushel basket. Would you rather hear a guitar solo or a bass solo when the bass player is the better musician by a wide margin?

In most cases, yes, I think, "Bass solo? Not again! Drum solo? Just shoot me..." But not always anymore. What makes the difference for me is playing at your level of talent versus showing off. It is a rare bass popping exhibition or Rock drum solo that does not strike me as showing off. The examples I cited above always seemed to move the music forward. Showing off, the "Look at me" syndrome, does not propel the music but stops it, or at least interrupts it. It strikes me as, to quote a Kurt Jurgens line, trivial and bombastic; surely a damning pairing of low class virtues. Basically a musical version of in your face BS. I'm too old to waste time listening to that crap.

Clark

Krunchy
04-15-2009, 07:15 AM
Big Country. Two really good guitarists, one a great vocalist. But the most talented were the rhythm section, two ex studio musicians. Hear them play back and forth with each other and the rest of the band on "Wonderland." The more times you hear this song, the more you realize how they dominated this band. The most memorable passages were bass or drums, or both together but still without the rest of the band. It was not a secret at the time. Everyone wanted them.Clark

Pete got one of them, Tony Butler, & he is part of history by virtue of the fact that he took part in the making of one of Pete's numerous masterpieces; Empty Glass.....
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61Z5Q5NQ2XL._SS500_.jpg

4313B
04-15-2009, 08:29 AM
He was far and away the most talented instrumentalist on the sessionWasn't Larry Carlton in there somewhere doing something?

jcrobso
04-15-2009, 08:39 AM
32 years ago I played in a punk band with a bassist who played one of those sticks. But we didn't let him use it in the band.

I played in Rock bands, wedding bands and a soul band. The last band was the soul band, playing the soul music of the late 1960s changed how I played bass for ever!;)
Now days I play mainly in Church on the worship team. My playing supports the song, I work with the drummer to setup a good base rhythm for each song. There are many songs where the bass starts out the song and establishes the pattern for the song. John

jcrobso
04-15-2009, 10:33 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AX5oV_i0LHI&feature=related

Ducatista47
04-15-2009, 10:58 AM
Wasn't Larry Carlton in there somewhere doing something?

Not on that cut. Joni did the guitar.

Clark

Ducatista47
04-15-2009, 09:05 PM
Pete got one of them, Tony Butler, & he is part of history by virtue of the fact that he took part in the making of one of Pete's numerous masterpieces; Empty Glass.....

Looks like he got them both. One of the the drummers was Mark Brzezicki. But that was before Big Country, when they were, I think, studio musicians. Looks like they were also on All The Best Cowboys Have Chinese Eyes and White City.

Clark

Krunchy
04-16-2009, 07:29 AM
Looks like he got them both. One of the the drummers was Mark Brzezicki. But that was before Big Country, when they were, I think, studio musicians. Looks like they were also on All The Best Cowboys Have Chinese Eyes and White City.Clark

Edit: Yes on both accounts, Tony & Mark appeared on BOTH albums :jawdrop:

Wow! That is quite the statement, those three albums being Pete Townshend's finest/best/most magnificent solo albums, Chinese eyes having an edge over the two others (white city being highly underrated would come in third IMO). I am very fond of Pete Townshend & for these guys to appear on these particular albums is just incredible.
Most of my cd's & other gear are boxed up in the cellar but I cant wait to dig those out & take a look at the liner notes.
Very Cool!

I remember the video of slit skirts & now that I look further into it there's mr. Tony &...Mark Brzezicki.
(I did not know that Mark was in Procol Harum too?!)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-6tKXtqZG04

Ducatista47
04-16-2009, 08:05 PM
Krunchy, it's a tough battle to get respect for bands you like that other people yawn at. I still get bad looks and rude remarks when I opine that Big Country was a great band. I may have the chronology backwards, but it seems that U2 found its power and sound after hearing Big Country. Yet friends still ask what I see in them. :blink:

Clark

Krunchy
04-17-2009, 06:07 PM
Hiya Clark!
The U2 reference is accurate, they admit it themselves (forgot where I saw or heard that).
Nothing wrong with that, they assimilated something they saw and made it their own, cant argue about their talent, they got IT, hence their fame, I love U2. But it is beyond me why some bands make it big on little talent (besides the obvious ploys) while gifted bands get little recognition. A lot of 80's bands garner very little credit in general & while there were a lot of silly and awful bands at the time there also emerged some real great ones as well. The talent pool of the 80's was much better than half the nonsense that was offered in the 90's or 2000's (my friends, strict classic rock types, would most enthusiastically dissagree with me on that, to the point of offering bodily harm, they all think 80's music is all flock of seaguls :D).
Tears For Fears & China Crisis come to mind, the latter never really took off in spite of the fact that they were so good that Walter Becker even produced some of their work. While the former was huge and rightly so IMO, their albums are so well produced and sound fantastic. Not to mention the Smiths, the Clash :blah::blah::blah:

If we could figure out why some bands succeed & some do not we could make a fortune :D
Coming back to topic, China Crisis' bass player, Gary Johnson, can put down some very nice grooves, real clean stuff.

Oh well, as long as you see the beauty in it & enjoy it... :p :nanana: (to put it mildly) what anyone else thinks.

rgwalker
04-19-2009, 02:26 AM
Krunchy, it's a tough battle to get respect for bands you like that other people yawn at. I still get bad looks and rude remarks when I opine that Big Country was a great band. I may have the chronology backwards, but it seems that U2 found its power and sound after hearing Big Country. Yet friends still ask what I see in them. :blink:

Clark

The Edge once said in an interview that if it wasn't for a guitar player named Keith Levine there would be no Edge. Keith played briefly with the Clash and later with Public Image Ltd. I don't think that you'll hear the influence from either on any U2 song.

Bob Walker
www.walker-entertainment.com (http://www.walker-entertainment.com)

Tom Brennan
04-19-2009, 08:41 AM
The Edge once said in an interview that if it wasn't for a guitar player named Keith Levine there would be no Edge. Keith played briefly with the Clash and later with Public Image Ltd. I don't think that you'll hear the influence from either on any U2 song.

Bob Walker
www.walker-entertainment.com (http://www.walker-entertainment.com)


Speaking of "The Edge" isn't he getting kind'a old for such a juvenile nickname?

"Hello, I'm The Edge. And I wear a hat all the time because I'm self conscious about my bald spot. Like the guy in the Beach Boys. I'm the bald spot "The Edge"."

Maybe he should get a hair transplant like that guy in The Buckinghams did. Funny as Hell, it came to a point right in the middle of his forehead. Kind of a drag.

4313B
04-19-2009, 08:45 AM
Speaking of "The Edge" isn't he getting kind'a old for such a juvenile nickname?That was my immediate thought as well but then I remembered that he was an entertainer. They can't all be "The Duke". :p The one I grimace at is "Slash". :rotfl:

Ducatista47
04-19-2009, 10:52 AM
If I remember this correctly - there is a minefield at my age - blame Bono's friends for Dave's name. Dave, that's The Edge. Bono's mates called him bono vox, Latin for beautiful voice. Eventually it stuck. Immediately taken with Paul Hewson (Bono's born name I recall) having an artist's name, Dave came up with the dreaded moniker.

I don't hold it against them. Talent generates a lot of forgiveness in my worldview, and U2 is a rare confluence of fame and talent. But I too detest the name game, since it began in earnest with talentless Punks who should rightly have been ashamed to be known in public by their real names. That made it a natural for talentless Hip Hop "artists" to follow suit. Perhaps the talentless Disney Channel musicians and singers will fess up and take on artists' names as well.

As you can tell, I do remember the real names of the musicians I respect. The one Rap artist who's name I know is Calvin Broadus. That's Snoop Dogg, the only Rapper I've ever liked. FWIW, he got the name from his Mom when he was a kid so, like Bono, he did not come up with the conceit himself. On the other hand, I kind of doubt if the late bass player's Mom called him Sid Vicious.

RE: Big Country & U2. The influence was more than instrumental. Bono certainly took strong notice of Stuart Adamson's singing. You can hear it in a flash. On guitar, Dave did likewise, although I do not know if all of Stuart's chops were assimilated. Did Dave ever use an EBow? Other than Phil Keaggy and Stuart, I draw a blank.

EDIT: Many of us use screen names for our public internet faces. Are we being hypocritical? I happen to know the real names of Widget and Zilch, because I asked (don't ask me, I'm not telling), but damn if I can remember the names everyone else seems to remember. JBL 4645 Is Ashley, Seawolf97 is Tom? But since I can't remember names to save my life and never could, could someone give me a cheat sheet?

Clark

Krunchy
04-20-2009, 08:17 AM
Speaking of "The Edge" isn't he getting kind'a old for such a juvenile nickname?

"Hello, I'm The Edge. And I wear a hat all the time because I'm self conscious about my bald spot. Like the guy in the Beach Boys. I'm the bald spot "The Edge"."

Maybe he should get a hair transplant like that guy in The Buckinghams did. Funny as Hell, it came to a point right in the middle of his forehead. Kind of a drag.

:rotfl::rotfl::rotfl: I love the Edge, but my thoughts were similar in regards to the hat thing, the name a little too. Same goes for Sting though :D Bottom line is the Edge could certainly afford a heck of a rug & have such a luxurious mane that it would surpass even Bono's (or as old blue eyes called him Botto) in his prime in its sheer splendour.

I remember seeing Bob Dylan in DC (mid dummer, 96+ degrees, mid day show, many moons ago) when he was opening for the dead and Bob would come out with leather pants & leather vest, meanwhile my then to be wife was almost passing out from heat stroke along with other young ladies that lay languishing in the sidelines.
The ego is mighty adversary and not to be taken lightly.
Mighty Powerful :D



I don't hold it against them. Talent generates a lot of forgiveness in my worldview, and U2 is a rare confluence of fame and talent. But I too detest the name game, since it began in earnest with talentless Punks who should rightly have been ashamed to be known in public by their real names.
Clark

:rotfl: :rotfl: :applaud: Very true on all accounts!
re: our monikers, in this age of identity awareness, we must all guard against the unseen threat. If someone stole my identity, I would only ask that I be allowed to steal someone elses for my own personal enjoyment, perhaps a more glamorous & exciting one :D

Fred

LE15-Thumper
04-20-2009, 11:25 AM
I am surprised no one has mentioned http://www.billysheehan.com/

This guy has done some incredible stuff with Steve Vai on the G3 tours with Joe Satriani

Ducatista47
08-05-2009, 12:35 AM
A really easy way to recall severely talented musicians since made obscure in the age of the Michael Jackson obit - look up the old Windham Hill Records roster. Long absorbed by A & M, their William Ackerman helmed days were astounding. Robbie Basho, for lord's sake. Michael Hedges. George Winston. Mark Isham. Darol Anger.

But I digress. More bass players than you can shake a stick at, but why not Michael Manring. There is some new music on his MySpace Music page, if you are feeling young and brave.

http://www.myspace.com/michaelmanring

Let me tag on Phil Maggini of of the late, great Shadowfax. (The band, not the Middle Earth horse namesake.)

Clark

Hoerninger
08-05-2009, 12:57 AM
Looks like they were also on All The Best Cowboys Have Chinese Eyes and White City.

Please, let me chime in.

After having been mentioned somewhere in this forum I have bought "Chinese Eyes". Yes, Tony Butler on bass and Mark Brzezicki on drums (Simon Phillips too).
____________
Peter

Krunchy
08-05-2009, 07:19 AM
Let me tag on Phil Maggini of of the late, great Shadowfax. (The band, not the Middle Earth horse namesake.)
Clark
:D :rotfl: I like Shadowfax, the band & the horse.


Peter, many Pete Towshend fans cosider that album to be one of his very best solo efforts, how do you like the album so far.
Actually it was Clark who first made me aware of Tony & Mark's cameos on that album. ;)

Hoerninger
08-05-2009, 07:43 AM
Peter, many Pete Towshend fans cosider that album to be one of his very best solo efforts, how do you like the album so far.

Fred, good question - I like it. :yes:

For an explanation I have to start with the WHO - Live at Leeds which I always enjoy very much. But the later WHO I do not like very much in general as they play too "loud" for me, I mean little dynamics, and their singing is not that what I like to follow.
But on "Chinese eyes" it is a singing which tries to express something, and it is nice that I can follow with the little booklet (second language!). The instruments are very distinguished and i can follow their melody, that is very pleasing to the ear and mind.
First this kind of music of Pete Townsend was very unusual for me as you can not hear it in the radio - mostly mainstream here.
___________
Peter

Krunchy
08-05-2009, 08:03 AM
the later WHO I do not like very much in general as they play too "loud" for me, I mean little dynamics, and their singing is not that what I like to follow.
But on "Chinese eyes" it is a singing which tries to express something, and it is nice that I can follow with the little booklet (second language!). The instruments are very distinguished and i can follow their melody, that is very pleasing to the ear and mind.
First this kind of music of Pete Townsend was very unusual for me as you can not hear it in the radio - mostly mainstream here. Peter

Hi Peter, I think that was one of Pete's reasons for going solo, he has spoken on the subject & felt a bit restricted with the Who format.
If you liked chinese eyes you would probably like his other solo outings.
The man has a lot of material to choose from, die hards would also consider the scoop albums to be invaluable though a bit fragmented/disjointed at times, they do hold some gems in theirs roster, the first scoop is probably the best of the lot :D

Krunchy
08-05-2009, 08:06 AM
Charlie Haden, in the last couple of months I have become quite fond of this man, especially his quartet west ensembles.
This recent piece on NPR has some great selections from him with various artists, very prolific, enjoy! :)
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=111492682

An interesting interview with the man.
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4164843

http://media.npr.org/assets/music/lists/takefive/2009/08/haden_custom.jpg

bigyank
08-05-2009, 09:59 AM
Leo Lyons of Ten Years After.......:D

LowPhreak
08-06-2009, 07:49 AM
IMO, the best bassists were some of the aforementioned, such as Squire, Levin, Casady (not "Cassidy"), The Ox, Bruce, East, JPJ, Wyman, some of the funk and jazz cats mentioned, et cetera....

One not mentioned who should also be at the top of the list:

- The late, great Allen Woody (http://www.globalbass.com/archives/june2001/allen_woody.htm), formerly of Gov't Mule. I saw him with the Mule at a small show at Pico Mt., VT in July 2000, about a month before he died.


"...Not since the live Mountain CD entitled Twin Peaks had anyone heard such a bass tone -- huge and warm with every note clear and audible.

...For the first time in many years, we were hearing killer bass tones so fat and rich -- a far cry from the weak sound that has become so prevalent today. On the song entitled Mother Earth, one could easily hear the Jack Bruce influence straight out of Live Cream Volume Two. On Mule, Allen pays tribute to Tower Of Power bassist Rocco Prestia with his big 16th note groove, and on Mr. Big, he nailed Andy Fraser’s vibe with such eloquence.

...In today’s abundance of slappers, tappers, and lightweight players, Allen Woody still sits at the top of the pack of rock players. He was the archetypal rock bassist who played difficult lines with ease and poise. He exhibited true character and utilized no gimmicks. Simply put, he just kicked ass on the bass."

If you want to hear what some of those top bassists can do, get a copy of Gov't Mule's tribute to Allen Woody, the concerts on "The Deep End 1 & 2" (http://www.mule.net/discography/07/index.html), or "The Deepest End" (http://www.mule.net/discography/deepest_end.html), or the film "Rising Low". (http://www.mule.net/discography/rising_low.html)

"25 Of The Greatest Bass Players Explore The Deep End:

Allen Woody
Alphonso Johnson
Bootsy Collins
Billy Cox
Chris Squire
Chris Wood
Dave Schools
Flea
George Porter Jr.
Jack Bruce
Jack Casady
Joey Arkenstat
John Entwistle
Terry Graham
Les Claypool
Meshell Ndegeocello
Mike Gordon
Mike Watt
Oteil Burbridge
Phil Lesh
Rocco Prestia
Roger Glover
Stefan Lessard
Tony Levin
Willie Weeks "

whizzer
08-06-2009, 12:07 PM
I think someone listed Andy Fraser (Free) near the beginning of this thread; he's a bassist that really deserves more mention. Free was basically a pure electric blues band, but on the album featuring their one big rock anthem show closer and monster hit, "Alright Now," there's a song entitled "Mr. Big." Fraser's playing on this song must be heard to be believed.

laurie
08-12-2009, 06:24 AM
This is quite a long thread so I'm sure some of these names have already come up. These are some of the best bass players I've seen play here in London over the years, some of these guys I've seen a few times in various groups and bands:

Victor Lemonte Wooten (twice with Bela Fleck & the Flecktones
Ron Carter
John Patituci
Marcus Miller (in Italy at Umbria Jazz festival)
Stanley Clarke
Lincoln Goines
Ira Coleman
Dave Holland
James Genus
Christian McBride
Matthew Garrison

I've never seen any great female bass players play live - I like plays like Tina Weymouth and Tracy Wormworth but I've never seen them live. I saw Rachel Z and her all female trio in 2001 but unfortunately I can't remember the name of the bass player.

BMWCCA
08-12-2009, 08:47 AM
I think someone listed Andy Fraser (Free) near the beginning of this thread; he's a bassist that really deserves more mention. Free was basically a pure electric blues band, but on the album featuring their one big rock anthem show closer and monster hit, "Alright Now," there's a song entitled "Mr. Big." Fraser's playing on this song must be heard to be believed.That may very well have been me who either added or seconded Fraser in this thread. If it wasn't I will now! Free brought a new dimension to rock in the '70s by featuring the bass as a lead instrument. Perhaps it was necessary since their lead guitarist (Paul Kossof) was so boring!

Interesting short story and links here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andy_Fraser

chad
11-16-2009, 02:04 PM
Ok, as a professional bass player of umpteen years, add me to the fan list:

- Paul S. Denman (Sade)
- Ray Brown
- Mike Porcaro (Toto)
- David Hungate (Toto)
- Will Lee (too numerous to mention.. note, Will received a 'lifetime achievement award' with Bass Player magazine)
- as far as the "far out" technical stuff, try Alain Caron

THEJBLKID
03-06-2010, 10:02 PM
check out edwin start easing in one of the thickest basslines ever

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y160/dead_guy/HellUpInHarlem-1Sheet.jpg

Hoerninger
01-10-2011, 09:18 AM
playing with Jeff Beck and Jennifer Batten
YOU NEVER KNOW
at Tokyo international Forum
June 2, 1999

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n1Mdl-bqGIo

Jeff Beck In Japan 1999
Amazon: B001CB9UOI (http://www.amazon.de/Jeff-Beck-Japan-DVD/dp/B001CB9UOI/ref=sr_1_18?ie=UTF8&s=dvd&qid=1294567310&sr=1-18-catcorr)
release date 2008 by TETRA POT FILMS
__________
Peter :)

Krunchy
01-10-2011, 10:59 AM
Very Hot!!!!
Thanks for the heads up Hoerninger, I'd love to see a CD collaboration with these guys.
Bit of a tease though, this is not released in the US :(

humbucking
03-20-2011, 09:15 PM
How about Gerald Johnson. He was Steve Miller's bass player in the 70's & 80's. There is a King Biscuit double album with disc 1 recorded live in 1973 & disc 2 live in 1975 or 76. These recordings capture the band at their best! Gerald Johnson lays down some incredible bass!

Allen Woody!

George Porter Jr!

Andy Frazier! (Kossoff was one of the greatest guitarists ever! Go get Free Live!)

Paul McCartney! Insane stuff with the Beatles. I'm always blown away with what Paul was doing back in the 1960's. Very technical bass lines. Not your common rythm guy.

Felix Papalardi- MOUNTAIN! There are some great live CD's from 1969-1974!

laurie
04-12-2012, 03:51 PM
Somewhere in this thread around two years ago I remember mentioning that there hasn't been too many great female bass players other than Tina Weymouth and a few others in recent times. Well, we can now add Esparanza Spalding to the list. I'm hoping to see her play in London next month.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZNw46j0nNOs

LowPhreak
04-18-2012, 12:45 PM
Well, we can now add Esparanza Spalding to the list. I'm hoping to see her play in London next month.



She was on Letterman last night, first time I'd heard/seen her play. Nice stuff.

hjames
05-13-2012, 06:24 AM
Legendary Bass Player, Donald "Duck" Dunn, passed away in his sleep early this morning after 2 shows at the Blue Note club in Tokyo.
He was 71.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_Duck_Dunn

Audiobeer
05-13-2012, 10:27 AM
http://www.rocknrollview.com/blog/2009/03/14/tal-wilkenfeld-bass-player-photo-gallery/

Titanium Dome
05-13-2012, 01:00 PM
and I would add Tal Wilkenfeld. Love her style!

Since the scarcity of great female bassist resurfaced, let's resurface Tal one more time. Her bass solo on Jeff Beck's Live at Ronnie Scott's bluray is incredible.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wf-J_sJB29Q

Of course, it sounds a lot better on a full frequency surround set, like the Two Jims Theatre, where, when I heard it, if she had been in the room I might have asked her to...




...let me adopt her. (what were you thinking, dirty old men?)

Even Jeff Beck is like "You want me to play after that??

Titanium Dome
05-13-2012, 01:02 PM
Legendary Bass Player, Donald "Duck" Dunn, passed away in his sleep early this morning after 2 shows at the Blue Note club in Tokyo.
He was 71.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_Duck_Dunn


Liked his work with Neil Young. :(

Harvey Gerst
05-13-2012, 02:33 PM
This is truly a sad day for me. I saw "Duck" at the Monterey Pop Festival when he played with Booker T (as part of the MG's), and again behind Otis Redding. He was one of the greats.

Odd
06-08-2012, 12:15 PM
Steinar Raknes

55950

http://www.steinarraknes.com/

Cactus Bob
06-08-2012, 06:55 PM
Marc Johnson & Eberhard Weber

Ducatista47
06-08-2012, 07:43 PM
Marc Johnson & Eberhard Weber
Damn, you know your bass players.

martin_wu99
06-12-2012, 07:44 AM
Hi,Who knonw this guy?
I occasionally bought his two albums,it's amazing:D

BMWCCA
06-12-2012, 09:49 AM
Who know this guy?

Many here, I'm sure: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanley_Clarke

martin_wu99
06-13-2012, 06:48 AM
Many here, I'm sure: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanley_Clarke
I can't believe he is so famous:eek:
When i hear his album,i think he must be a black man:D
I only spent 10 RMB(1.5$) for his album,but it's a HIFI recording:applaud:

boputnam
06-13-2012, 02:11 PM
As BMW points out, he's pretty legendary.

I think his first break through was with Chick Corea and Return to Forever. I crewed their shows in Syracuse back-in-the-day.

On of my personal favorite collaborations was much later, in Animal Logic, with Deborah Holland and Stewart Copeland. They only released two CD's - I and II ('89 and '91 respectively) Hard to find then, but it seems the all knowing Amazon has them still. This gets mention on the Wiki reference, but needs some "!!", IMO...

SEAWOLF97
12-22-2012, 10:07 AM
Iron Butterfly bassist Lee Dorman dead at 70http://www.torontosun.com/2012/12/22/iron-butterfly-bassist-lee-dorman-dead-at-70

BMWCCA
12-22-2012, 04:19 PM
Here you go: http://www.torontosun.com/2012/12/22/iron-butterfly-bassist-lee-dorman-dead-at-70