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Robh3606
05-12-2003, 10:38 PM
I was looking over one of my cabinets and found a blister in the vernier about 1 1/2 inches in diameter. Nothing special an L20t3 but it is part of a set I put together. A pair of L80T3 and 3 L20t3 that took me 2 years of Ebay auctions to find 3 L20t3 with Dark Walnut vernier so all would match. They are in really good shape except for this and I would hate to have the vernier come off or peel even if it is cosmetic. What do you do?? Can you inject a little glue under it or carefully slit it and brush glue under it?? Leave it alone hope for the best?? Any ideas???

Thanks Rob :(

Rolf
05-13-2003, 01:01 AM
I would put some glue on it and put a hevy object (and I mean HEAVY) on top, then wait 24 hours before removing it.

Rolf

Doctor_Electron
05-13-2003, 01:09 AM
Hi again, Robb! How about...
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=%22veneer+repair%22&btnG=Google+Search
Good Luck!

Mr. Widget
05-13-2003, 02:52 AM
I have done quite a few veneer repairs over the years. Many commercially applied veneers are bonded to the substrate with heat. Depending on the glue used by JBL, it is very likely that a completely dry steam iron set to wool/cotton will reactivate the glue which can then be either clamped or "Hammered" back down. The "Hammer" veneer technique sounds funny, but is actually a traditional technique. You take a mallet and a block of wood without sharp edges and tap the veneer down once the glue is heat activated. If done correctly you will never know the work was done.

Injecting doesn't work very often. A clean slice followed by carefully spreading glue can be successful, but usually there will be a tell-tale sign.

Placing a heavy object on the surface to act as a clamp is unlikely to work as you will probably need 15-50psi depending on how bad the blister is. Even 15psi over a 2" by 2" area requires a 60lbs. weight.

If you post a photo there may be a clue for a better recommendation.

Widget

Rolf
05-13-2003, 05:43 AM
Originally posted by Mr. Widget
Placing a heavy object on the surface to act as a clamp is unlikely to work as you will probably need 15-50psi depending on how bad the blister is. Even 15psi over a 2" by 2" area requires a 60lbs. weight.

Widget

Hi Mr. Widget.

I have done this several times with great sucess. A SMALL amount of contact glue (the one you use on both sides and allow to dry), and the a heavy weight. The weight I use is an "ambolt" (don't know the English word), and it weights about 60 Kg, I guess about 130 -140 lbs.

Rolf

Mr. Widget
05-13-2003, 11:34 AM
Hi Rolf,

What you are saying is quite in line with my experience and what I was saying. It never occurred to me to set a 60Kg anything on my speakers or furniture, but that should do it. When most people place a "heavy" item on something they are talking about 30 lbs. 13-14Kg.

Isn't it difficult to get the contact cement on both surfaces under a blister? I think a little wood glue is easier to spread and it will squish deeper into the blister. You just need to be careful not to use too much.

Widget

Rolf
05-13-2003, 11:48 AM
Originally posted by Mr. Widget
Hi Rolf,

What you are saying is quite in line with my experience and what I was saying. It never occurred to me to set a 60Kg anything on my speakers or furniture, but that should do it. When most people place a "heavy" item on something they are talking about 30 lbs. 13-14Kg.

Isn't it difficult to get the contact cement on both surfaces under a blister? I think a little wood glue is easier to spread and it will squish deeper into the blister. You just need to be careful not to use too much.

Widget

Yes Mr. Widget. That was why I said "and I mean HEAVY". Yes, it is difficult to get the glue on both sides...Depends on the size of the blister. Use a magnifying? glass. If it is a very small one, I just use a tooth pick. The wood glue is also ok, I have used it some times, but in my experiance this get loose easier than contact glue after some time.

Regards

Rolf

Robh3606
05-13-2003, 04:43 PM
Thanks Guys

The dry iron worked like a charm. Then I stacked stuff on it. Good as new can-t even tell where the blister was.

Rob:)

jbl
07-02-2004, 05:22 PM
I have tryed what Mr. Widget suggests with great success. Place a thin rag under the iron so that you do not heat the veneer directly resulting in a shine on the veneer. I used a wood roller designed to squeeze out the excess glue, but it worked great when the veneer began to separate. Don't apply excess pressure or you will mar the veneer. Set the iron to a medium setting.

Ron

Gary L
07-02-2004, 07:16 PM
Mr. Widget, My sentiments exactly! I have many years of cabnitmaking and the hot iron is by far the best remedy. I have injected and inspected and poor results is the best I can get.
I have also found that preparing the area with a warm wet rag prior to the hot iron brings a more lasting result. Makes the veneer more pliable for the fix.
Great to hear all the helpful hint from those who have traveled this path. Experience in my area tells me, get it damp, get it warm and get it clamped. Then get some good paste wax over it to keep the culprit out- MOISTURE. Some sections of the natural wood are less dense and more prone to allowing moisture in.
This is the usual cause of poor adhesion. If the cabinets are waxed the problem will be avoided. I do not recomend oil on a veneered cabinet. Wax on, wax off and all will last a very long time. Do it twice a year and yes it sucks but it does work.......
Look at it this way. The speakers massage your ears so it is only fair that you massage the wood every now and again. PM- preventive maintainance and keeping them out of direct sun and dampness.
Wood is a natural product that moves with the humidity or lack there off and all woods move differently. Glue is a man made substance usually placed between two dis-similar substances and it is expected to be super. If part "A" moves at a different rate then part "B" and the only thing holding them together is part "Glue", something has to give. Keep the moisture and dry heat out at all costs......
Gary L