PDA

View Full Version : Really Good Lead Guitar



speakerdave
02-25-2007, 11:56 AM
I have been trying to fill in some gaps in my listening experience and CD collection and have been talking with some of my students who claim to have an interest in rock, and I've been following up on some of their suggestions with mixed results.

I'm specifically looking for outstanding lead guitar.

I was talking with one of my students the other day, and the idea came up that you could number the really great guitarists (rock) on the fingers of one hand. We agreed on Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton and Stevie Ray. We couldn't agree on the final two. Actually we couldn't think of two more who were in that category. Our working definition of "really great guitarist" was playing that goes way beyond technical skill and musicality to this: when they play improvisationally they stun you with the sheer flow of ideas. There are lots of applicants. Outside of the field of rock I would put Django in that league and possibly John McLaughlin, although I'm not so sure about that, and in blues Robert Johnson. There are lots of guitarists who may have been great, but their playing seems to lose its creative edge and lapse into self-mimicry (B.B.King, for example)

Anyway, this is an invitation to discuss "really good guitarists" who might potentially be upgraded to "really great." I would appreciate names, groups, recommended albums, even cuts. Performance DVD's would be of special interest. If you could say a little something about why you think your particular selections should be considered, that would be very helpful in developing a critical vocabulary.

Thanks,

David

kingjames
02-25-2007, 12:35 PM
Alvin Lee,Ten Years After "HELP ME" (Rock) Guitar solo awesome.
Roy Buchanan "Messiah will come again" (Blues) make's his guitar cry.
Eddie Van Halen (for the speed at which he plays) Just good.

These are a few that I can recall.

hjames
02-25-2007, 12:48 PM
Leo Kotke - 6 and 12 String Guitar (nearly anything off this album - the guy serious has finger pickin' skills, even when quite young)

Phil Manzanera - Diamondhead - Alma (guitar player from Roxy Music)

Carlos Santana - Caravanserai - Song of the Wind (Most anything by Carlos ...)

JBLRaiser
02-25-2007, 01:06 PM
Need I say more? Ok, I will...

Duane Allman, Ry Cooder, Jeff Beck, Robert Cray.

porschedpm
02-25-2007, 01:40 PM
I don't know what else these guys did but Velvet Underground's Steve Hunter's and Dick Wagner's guitars on Lou Reeds "Intro/Sweet Jane" are classic and worth mentioning.

BMWCCA
02-25-2007, 01:42 PM
You've hit some good ones! How 'bout Derek Trucks (just ask Clapton), John Mayer (if you've not seen him on the Crossroads Guitar Festival DVD, don't pre-judge him, and oh yeah, ask Clapton...), and I'll toss Mato Nangi in there for good measure (Indigenous). Not saying this is his best, but it is a sample: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N3sQptZcKr8

Also:Mayer at Crossroads here. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6sPmTgPvx28)

And probably anything from Al Di Meola, depending on your taste.

speakerdave
02-25-2007, 01:57 PM
Alvin Lee,Ten Years After "HELP ME"

OK on him. I'm replaying his cut on the Isle of Wight Album, and I think he can play. Would "Live at the Filmore East" be the album to get?


Roy Buchanan "Messiah will come again" (Blues) make's his guitar cry.


Ya. I've listened to him some. I like it, but he's off in a corner of his own, I think.


Eddie Van Halen (for the speed at which he plays) Just good.

This name has come up before. I plan to find something by him. What album would you recommend?


Leo Kotke - 6 and 12 String Guitar (nearly anything off this album - the guy serious has finger pickin' skills, even when quite young)
You mean the Armadillo Album? Yes, I have that (mine is on the Takoma label)

I'm good there; have five of his albums. You're right--he can play.

And that reminds me--iconoclastic acoustic stylists: You might like John Fahey--I have "Requia" and "Fare Forward, Voyagers"--and Peter Walker--I have "Rainy Day Raga."


Phil Manzanera - Diamondhead - Alma (guitar player from Roxy Music)


I'll look for him.


Carlos Santana - Caravanserai - Song of the Wind (Most anything by Carlos ...)
Ah, yes. I should have mentioned him. I have the half-speed mastered Abraxas on vinyl and the guru era collaboration with John McLaughlin, "Love, Devotion, Surrender." Actually, I've considered adding Caravanserai in the past; I should go get it.

Thanks,

David

speakerdave
02-25-2007, 02:13 PM
[regarding Jimmy Page] Need I say more? Ok, I will... Yes, you can tell where to hear Jimmy Page undiluted by Robert Plant's screaming style of vocals. Not my cup of tea. I just got the digitally remastered first album, and jeez . . . . (but I do like Pages' guitar).


Duane Allman, Ry Cooder, Jeff Beck, Robert Cray.

Duane Allman, yes. I have the Allman Brothers at the Fillmore. Jeff Beck--I recently bought Blow By Blow, and thought it a real snoozer (this is why I'm asking for help, actually) Is there anything else? Ry Cooder--pretty artistic, yes--I'll try some more of him. I don't know if the stuff I have is what you mean. I have Jazz, which I like, and a Water Lily CD of him playing with vina player V.M. Bhatt (whom I heard play live in India a couple of weeks ago), and of course I love what he did with the
Buena Vista Social Club musicians. Robert Cray--that name has come up. What albums?

Thanks,

David

edgewound
02-25-2007, 02:18 PM
Good thread, Dave.

Can taste, phrasing, and timing and not overplaying be considered?

I think most people underestimate the musicianship of David Gilmour.

His solo in Pink Floyd's "Comfortably Numb" is a composition in and of itself that defines that song. It has all the great ingredients of a guitar solo...beginning that comes out of main song...a build up...a crescendo...and then ends masterfully back into the main tune...all with great taste...tension...melody...technique...not playing too many notes in the right places.


Another all time great, legendary guitarist is Larry Carlton. Most all of his recorded solos were improvised at the time of recording.

He palyed guitar on many Steely Dan songs, including the great solo on "Josie".

I'd say less than five great guitar players is too short of a list.

Vince Gill is another great player that was the only "country" player invited by Eric Clapton to join the "Crossroads" tour.

Oh yeah....listen to the early ZZ Top....Billy Gibbons is a very underappreciated player too.

speakerdave
02-25-2007, 02:28 PM
Good thread, Dave.

Can taste, phrasing, and timing and not overplaying be considered?


Yes, please!

I'd say less than five great guitar players is too short of a list.
Well, maybe that's a casual listener's list!


I think most people underestimate the musicianship of David Gilmour.

His solo in Pink Floyd's "Comfortably Numb" is a composition in and of itself that defines that song. It has all the great ingredients of a guitar solo...beginning that comes out of main song...a build up...a crescendo...and then ends masterfully back into the main tune...all with great taste...tension...melody...technique...not playing too many notes in the right places.

Another all time great, legendary guitarist is Larry Carlton. Most all of his recorded solos were improvised at the time of recording.

He palyed guitar on many Steely Dan songs, including the great solo on "Josie".

Vince Gill is another great player that was the only "country" player invited by Eric Clapton to join the "Crossroads" tour.

Oh yeah....listen to the early ZZ Top....Billy Gibbons is a very underappreciated player too.
This is great. This is one of the things I was hoping for--a player's player list.

Thanks

David

edgewound
02-25-2007, 02:46 PM
Ah yes...there's more...

Lee Ritenour's "Feel the Night", "Wes Bound" tribute to Wes Montgomery, "Larry and Lee" with Larry Carlton, anything by Wes Montogomery, Dickie Betts' work with the Allman Bros, esp. "Live at the Fillmore East", and with his own band, Jeff Beck's "Wired", Steve Lukather and Larry Carlton "Live in Japan", Robben Ford...anything by him really, Peter Frampton's "Frampton Comes Alive" and with Humble Pie "Rockin' the Fillmore", George Benson with Vido Musso...awesome.

I'll list more as I think of them...

Al DiMeola was in "Return to Forever" with Lenny White on drums, Chick Corea on keys, and Stanley Clark on bass....this is some of the most incendiary, monsters-technique-laden, and technically incomprehensible musicianship ever recorded....what they do is simply mind boggling.

Don't forget Frank Zappa, Steve Vai and his guitar teacher at Berklee College of music, Joe Satriani.

Ritchie Blackmore is another....you know, Deep Purple and Ritchie Blackmore's Rainbow.

Joe Walsh and The Eagles work with Randy Meisner, Don Felder.

Eric Johnson has a very interesting technique, Steve Morse from the Dixie Dregs and also tours with the latest version of Deep Purple.

The two guitarists for Styx, Tommy Shaw and James Young complemented each other quite well on "The Grand Illusion"

Another two guitarist band that are still going strong after 30+ years is Aerosmith with Joe Perry and Brad Whitford

speakerdave
02-25-2007, 03:00 PM
Ah yes...there's more...

Lee Ritenour's "Feel the Night", "Wes Bound" tribute to Wes Montgomery, "Larry and Lee" with Larry Carlton, anything by Wes Montogomery, Dickie Betts' work with the Allman Bros, esp. "Live at the Fillmore East", and with his own band, Jeff Beck's "Wired", Steve Lukather and Larry Carlton "Live in Japan", Robben Ford...anything by him really, Peter Frampton's "Frampton Comes Alive" and with Humble Pie "Rockin' the Fillmore", George Benson with Vido Musso...awesome.

I'll list more as I think of them...

Al DiMeola was in "Return to Forever" with Lenny White on drums, Chick Corea on keys, and Stanley Clark on bass....this is some of the most incendiary, monsters-technique-laden, and technically incomprehensible musicianship ever recorded....what they do is simply mind boggling.

Don't forget Frank Zappa, Steve Vai and his guitar teacher at Berklee College of music, Joe Satriani.

Ritchie Blackmore is another....you know, Deep Purple and Ritchie Blackmore's Rainbow.
Man, this is a rich vein. Let it flow!

I do listen to the Mothers. I have Hot Rats, Freak Out, Only In It For the Money, and One Size Fits All on vinyl. These are treasures. Great antidotes to the after-effects presidential news conferences.

edgewound
02-25-2007, 03:25 PM
More...

Pat Travers, Ted Nugent(also Amboy Dukes), The Outlaws...I don't know the 3 guitarists names.

Old Lynard Skynard and post mortem "Rossington-Collins Band"

The 1980's big hair band, NightRanger had two great guitarists Jeff Watson and Brad Gillis.

Two legendary players probably no one ever thinks about anymore are Roy Clark and Glen Campbell.

And then there is of course the great Chet Atkins.

Mark Knopfler from Dire Straits.

Kenny Wayne Shepherd who was a child prodigy influenced from Stevie Ray Vaughn, but is accused of being too much like SRV. Whatever....he still tears it up.

speakerdave
02-25-2007, 03:38 PM
More...

Pat Travers, Ted Nugent(also Amboy Dukes), The Outlaws...I don't know the 3 guitarists names.

Old Lynard Skynard and post mortem "Rossington-Collins Band"

The 1980's big hair band, NightRanger had two great guitarists Jeff Watson and Brad Gillis.

Two legendary players probably no one ever thinks about anymore are Roy Clark and Glen Campbell.

And then there is of course the great Chet Atkins.

Mark Knopfler from Dire Straits

Edgewound! Edgewound!

I listened to Chet Atkins when I was a kid (what happened to those albums, and my Duane Eddy, too?)

I've got Hot Rats on now. Zappa's playing on "Son of Mr Green Genes" is outstanding. I'll hear that cut again.

David

Hofmannhp
02-25-2007, 03:42 PM
Hi folks,

wonder why he's not that well known in the US...
take his Album "live at Tampa Bay Blues Festival 2000"
the following link lists him as No. 6 in the guitarists billboard of BBC UK

http://www.waltertrout.com/top20.htm

HP

edgewound
02-25-2007, 03:53 PM
Hi folks,

wonder why he's not that well known in the US...
take his Album "live at Tampa Bay Blues Festival 2000"
the following link lists him as No. 6 in the guitarists billboard of BBC UK

http://www.waltertrout.com/top20.htm

HP

There are sooo many phenomenal players around the world...and probably in your own city that no one knows of.

I go to the NAMM show every year and I'm almost afraid to pick up a guitar and play because the whole show is loaded with talent walking around the floor...many are kids under twenty that just soak this stuff up. It takes some time though, to learn how to speak through the instrument with soul and feel. First comes learning how to play it...then learning how to speak through it...pretty corny, huh?

speakerdave
02-25-2007, 04:05 PM
It takes some time though, to learn how to speak through the instrument with soul and feel. First comes learning how to play it...then learning how to speak through it...pretty corny, huh?
Nope--not corny. It's the truth, and thank you for saying it. As Bob Dylan has said, it's all about connecting with the audience. There may be a lot of different ways of trying to get at that verbally, but when it happens it is unmistakeable.

David

edgewound
02-25-2007, 04:12 PM
There may be a lot of different ways of trying to get at that verbally, but when it happens it is unmistakeable.

David

Ya know? Love it or hate it..."American Idol" showcases exactly that statement, Dave.

The singers that really live the moment...with honesty, and real vocal talent...shines through brightly with that intangible connection...You can feel it when it happens.

I gotta go change the oil and mow the lawn now:blink: ....I'd rather be doing this....I've procastinated long enough.

See ya later.:D:)

jim campbell
02-25-2007, 04:21 PM
there are tons of great guitarists out there now and since every new generation has the benefit of the collected knowlege of everything past they are sure to get better and better.the only fly in the ointment is originality which is becomming more rare.try revisiting the whats playing now thread as there are great performances mentioned there and no doubt will be many more.

speakerdave
02-25-2007, 04:22 PM
. . . . I gotta go . . . . mow the lawn now . . . .
I was supposed to do that yesterday, but it rained up here. Too bad!;) And I never do it on Sunday.

David

kingjames
02-25-2007, 04:35 PM
sorry, live at the filmore east would be the album, and the guitar solo by Alvin Lee in "Help Me" is a real treat.

Roy buchanan plays his guitar in the messiah from album (Roy Buchanan 1972) he hits some notes in that song that I didn't know were possible.

Eddie Van Halen from the album "Van Halen" shows his skills being one of the fastest guitarists in the world.

And as Edgewound said Mark Knopler of Dire Straits album "Brothers in arms" from the unbelieveable "Sultans of Swing" to the tribute song "Brother's in Arm's) is a great guitarist and both of these songs are enjoyed best at around 40 watts or higher.

speakerdave
02-25-2007, 05:13 PM
Hi folks,

wonder why he's not that well known in the US...
take his Album "live at Tampa Bay Blues Festival 2000"
the following link lists him as No. 6 in the guitarists billboard of BBC UK

http://www.waltertrout.com/top20.htm

HP
I'm confused. He's on your "Groups You Can't Stand" thread list (with some other good ones). Did you misread the point of that thread? Or what?

David

mikebake
02-25-2007, 05:57 PM
Elliott Randall, best known perhaps for his work on Steely Dans albums, i.e. "Reelin' in the Years"

Titanium Dome
02-26-2007, 12:57 AM
I'll second Ritchie Blackmore. If there was never another album after Deep Purple In Rock that'd be enough. But the four albums leading up to that, several of the follow ups, the first couple of Rainbow releases, and various orchestral outings all display his quirky, idiosyncratic, syncopatic, jazz/rock/classical stylings. The boy does know how to modulate feedback and bend a string.

I still have a fragment of his guitar that I scuttled under the stack of stage monitors to retrieve when he played at Wings Stadium, just before security dragged my flailing ass out from under the risers. :rockon1:

Titanium Dome
02-26-2007, 01:32 AM
Next up I'd have to bring forward Phil Keaggy, the nine-fingered guitarist of Glass Harp and later Christian rock fame. Everyone probably knows the urban legend about Hendrix naming him the greatest guitarist in the world, which might have actually been shortest guitarist in the world, or nothing at all.

The Nuge did say Keaggy could save the world with his guitar, before the Christian rock thing came along and kind of put a plastic glow to that comment.

Keaggy is very fast, melodic, stylish, and inventive. He can be funky if need be, and his musical range covers many genres. He's done some blistering solos on the old Decca recordings of Glass Harp, like Synergy.

I bought a four CD set of Keaggy's instrumental work that was sold in Office Depot or Office Max or Staples for Pete's sake, and it has such an amazing palette of musical textures and genres that it makes me wonder what the hell it was doing there.

A lot of Keaggy's CCM (Christian Contemporary Music) work is bland and, ironically, uninspired, though he wins more Dove awards than just about anybody. But every once in awhile there's a track or two, or even an entire side that makes me think, "Maybe Hendrix did say that," or "Geez, Nugent was right, this guy could save the world with his guitar."

Titanium Dome
02-26-2007, 01:44 AM
If chording is an art, then Pete Townshend is its Picasso. This old Brit is still teaching young punks what it means to be a Rocker. His guitar playing certainly has stayed in better shape that bandmate Daltry's voice.

Pete typifies energy and raw power. Arm circling like a windmill, strings breaking, axes smashing, monitors groaning, amps burning, these are a few of my favorite things. His playing has many, many memorable riffs, some of which have become a part of contemporary culture for better or worse.

Titanium Dome
02-26-2007, 01:54 AM
Well, let's correct this oversight right now–Jeff Beck.

Not the most stable man to be sure, but the guitar playing was/is incredible. His influence and innovations in the 60s spawned a whole generation of Beck wannabes. He's won four Grammy Awards, including one in 2003. His album Jeff from 2003 shows why he's had a lasting influence on every generation of guitar players since he played with the Yardbirds in the '60s.

Titanium Dome
02-26-2007, 02:07 AM
I'll raise a pick to Yngwie Malmsteen as well. His Rising Force album tells you everything you need to know, or you can pick up the Satriani/Vai/Malmsteen G3 Live In Denver effort from 2003. It has three jams included (one Neil Young and two Jimi Hendrix songs) that will let you measure him among two of the very best.

Titanium Dome
02-26-2007, 02:13 AM
Well, I need to get to bed, but I have a cold, so it's hard to sleep. Anyway, there's a few more names I'll come back to.

Joe Walsh
Tommy Bolin
Prince

Hoerninger
02-26-2007, 03:59 AM
Really Good Lead Guitar

... Pete Townshend ... Arm circling like a windmill, strings breaking, axes smashing, monitors groaning, amps burning ...

:rotfl:

Should go and buy a DVD.
[CDs there are plenty.]
___________
Peter

Fred Sanford
02-26-2007, 05:09 AM
I'll try to hit those not mentioned yet, but I do want to hear TiDome's Joe Walsh/Tommy Bolin/Prince reviews, they all would have been on my list.

Lifetime achievement awards:

***************************************
Tony Iommi - not the best soloist, but he's worked long & hard at it and influenced millions. At least as good a lead player as Blackmore is a rhythm player, how's that?

Brian May - can do it all and has. Tasty, appropriate for the song, innovative, influential, consistent. Among the all-time best, to me.

Brian Setzer - DON'T dismiss him as just a rockabilly player, he can stand up with Gilmour and hold his own, I kid you not. They certainly won't sound anywhere near the same, but Setzer won't go home embarrassed. He's that good.

Angus Young - perseverence? Consistent, fun, assertive.

Jerry Cantrell - I think this guy's got it all, too, but hasn't gotten his due. Some great songwriting over the years, and the "Boggy Depot" solo album's really good.

Charlie Christian - stunned me when I listened through his box set. To this day, smokes most of the players out there, and on the equipment of his time. Worth buying the box set.

Les Paul - same thing: buy the big box set. Go see him before he dies. See him twice in case he has an off night. Go.

Danny Gatton - discussed in other threads lately, stunningly good but never got his due.

John Scofield - sometimes off in space or repetitive, but imaginative and original and inspirational.

Neil Geraldo - solid. Tasty. Great technique.

Worth looking up:

**************************************
Stevie Salas - from ColorCode to Was (Not Was) to Sass Jordan to his solo stuff, a real chameleon that plays with feeling and finesse.

The Jayhawks - some beautiful soloing (particularly as guests on Maria McKee's "You Gotta Sin to Get Saved" album) that's had me going back to them a lot lately.

Robben Ford - inconsistent songwriting & production, but when he rips he really can play. A favorite is "The Brother", I believe a tribute to SRV.

Sonny Landreth - like Ford, has ups & downs with the context he's playing in, but he can make your head spin in a "how'd he do that" way. Finger picking/slide/zydeco stuff that's just brilliant.

Jeff Golub - known for his easy, jazzy stuff, he's a monster player with great touch & tone.

Nuno Bettencourt - impressive, I'm going to make an effort to dig for more of his later stuff.

Brother Cane - "Seeds" - honorary mention, this album has some great solos on it and thick, meaty guitar tones & textures.

Elliot Easton - exceptional utility player, didn't really get to stretch out in The Cars but really impressive when he did.

Dan Baird - "Love Songs for the Hearing Impaired" - another honorary mention, for the same reasons. If you like electric guitar tones, listen to this one. Great Brendan O'Brian production, fun songs, excellent playing.

Screaming Cheetah Wheelies - "SCW" and "Magnolia" honorary mention #3 (and 4, I guess). Dual-lead sorta Southern Rock bluesy wailin' albums.

The Hellecasters - three ungodly talented players just plain show off and make you want to quit playing.

Gary Moore - certainly has his moments and some killer tones.

Slash - has obviously had his moments but is really hit or miss lately.

Rich Williams - Kansas, underrated player over the years.

Michael Lee Firkins - if you like the metal/shred instrumental albums, look him up, you won't regret it. Tastier and more eclectic, but still plays the seemingly impossible.

Michael Ward - School Of Fish & later in The Wallflowers, great feedback control and tasty play-for-the-song sense.

Nils Lofgren - "Valentine" solo from Silver Lining always moves me, nice fingerpicking feel.

Randy Rhoads - others can probably elaborate more, an excellent composer & technical player, I never loved his tone but always remembered his solos note for note.

Mike Campbell - talk about playing for the song. What a perfect companion for any songwriter, he'll always make you look good without disrespecting the song. Texture for days, picks just the right tools for the job.

Warren DeMartini - gotta mention him if you're mentioning any of the big-hair bands, he had serious tone & chops.


je

pioneer
02-26-2007, 06:33 AM
Jerry Garcia

hjames
02-26-2007, 06:36 AM
Oh - don't forget Bill Nelson - guitar hero for BeBop Deluxe - http://www.astralwerks.com/be_bop_deluxe/intro.html

see Bill's homepage at http://www.billnelson.com/




Jerry Garcia - Who? :applaud:

whizzer
02-26-2007, 07:22 AM
When it comes to listing the masters of rock and roll lead guitar, I do wish people would at least mention Mick Ronson. And when it comes to just playing off the top of his head, Jeff Beck is great, at least in my opinion.

Harvey Gerst
02-26-2007, 07:54 AM
May I add:

Merle Travis
Joe Maphis
Doc Watson
Clarence White
Rick Ruskin
Dick Rosmini (Also worked at JBL)
Roger McGuinn
Barney Kessel
Albert King
George Van Epps

I think Django inspired many people( like Les Paul, Wes Montgomery, and others) to take some of what Django was doing and making it into a style.

louped garouv
02-26-2007, 08:16 AM
a friend of mine's older brother plays the old bayou-style blues real well IMO....

last album was up for a grammy (but didn't win)

Tab Benoit
http://www.tabbenoit.com/brothertotheblues.html


catch him live if he runs through your town, his live shows are real real fun....

I like to keep track of how many strings he goes through ;)

Guy in WNY
02-26-2007, 08:58 AM
Metallica and DragonForce come to mind right away. There is an entire genre? of metal called "speed metal" that is real fast - double bass on the drums and real quick picking on the lead.

Steve Schell
02-26-2007, 09:23 AM
Over time I have come to appreciate the stellar blues playing of Michael Bloomfield, a white Jewish kid from the northern suburbs of Chicago who haunted the blues clubs of the south side and learned from and played with many of the greats. He developed his own powerful, unmistakable style, and died much too young... a lot of that going around.

Terry Kath of Chicago was something else. I often dig out Chicago II to listen to his incredible playing throughout this double LP (Chicago's best IMO). Check him out on "25 or 6 to 4."

John Mayer is a tremendously talented young player who has mysteriously escaped the talent filter of the current pop music scene and risen to the top. I could do without all the screaming teenage girls in his live stuff, but man, that kid can play with soul, in his own voice.

Has anybody mentioned Robin Trower? Often accused of being derivative of Hendrix (who isn't), but I only hear that a little bit. Another player with a unique style; never a bad note from him.

Richard Thompson is a superb player. His poetry on the Stratocaster is other-worldly on Richard and Linda Thompson's "Shoot Out the Lights." Lots of terrific stuff from him more recently as well.

edgewound
02-26-2007, 09:48 AM
Hey guys and doll...

Thanks for reminding/enlightening on the player's list.

Jeff Beck is my all time fav....he is the living innovator of modern rock guitar.

He was doing Hendrix before Hendrix did it...and went on to expand his playing horizons...and is still alive and as good as ever...still doing it.

SEAWOLF97
02-26-2007, 10:16 AM
This list is missing the greatest solo acoustic guitar players to ever live. I'll give you the initals.

A.S.

number two is

C.M.

edgewound
02-26-2007, 10:27 AM
This list is missing the greatest solo acoustic guitar players to ever live. I'll give you the initals.

A.S.

number two is

C.M.

A.S = Andres Segovia

C.M. = Carlos Montoya

What about Leona Boyd?

What about Paco De Lucia?

What about....yes, that's right...Charo? coochie coochie...:applaud: :D

For an extremely compelling and fun live acoustic classical record, get "Friday Night in San Francisco" with Al DiMeola, John McLaughlin and Paco De Lucia....amazing.

Tim Rinkerman
02-26-2007, 10:37 AM
WHAT? NO ALAN HOLDSWORTH ????

hjames
02-26-2007, 10:39 AM
WHAT? NO ALAN HOLDSWORTH ????

Don't forget Fish rising - Steve Hillage!!

SEAWOLF97
02-26-2007, 10:47 AM
A.S = Andres Segovia

C.M. = Carlos Montoya


What about Paco De Lucia?



gold star for edgewound.

PDL does great Maleguena as do some others, but was watching Segovia last week on arts channel. IMHO , he IS the master.

A little know title that's great is "The Millers Dance" from Maunuel De Falla. superb.
And the absolute classic is Concierto de Aranjuez , from Rodrigo

edgewound
02-26-2007, 10:57 AM
I think SpeakerDave got more than he bargained for...got all genre's with his request.

That'll fill up the pallet:applaud:

edgewound
02-26-2007, 11:03 AM
WHAT? NO ALAN HOLDSWORTH ????


Allan Holdsworth is Eddie Van Halen's mentor.

I saw him live at Cal Poly, Pomona theater about 20 years ago. Yes...he's an incredible musician...his hand span is like 7 or 8 frets...but I gotta tell ya...he put me to sleep.

The warm up band, The Fents...blew him away.

SEAWOLF97
02-26-2007, 12:53 PM
you know , EW , that I just realized that your screen name can be interpreted two different ways. :blink:

edgewound
02-26-2007, 12:56 PM
you know , EW , that I just realized that your screen name can be interpreted two different ways. :blink:

What was your first interpretation?

SEAWOLF97
02-26-2007, 02:07 PM
What was your first interpretation?

SW: "eeewwww, thats a nasty injury you got there, EW"

EW: "Dont worry SW, its just an edgewound. I'll be OK"

edgewound
02-26-2007, 02:20 PM
SW: "eeewwww, thats a nasty injury you got there, EW"

EW: "Dont worry SW, its just an edgewound. I'll be OK"

I've heard something like that before.

It's the other interpretation.;) :p

Thom
02-26-2007, 05:15 PM
John Fahey, true master of the twelve string. Leo Kotke said that Fahey was a mentor. Put out tremendous albums. A joke and a clown in person. I read once how disappointing his shows could be and then I got to see him in person and it was so true.

Also, I've been looking and I haven't seen Les Paul's name. He's not just a name on a guitar. I'm pretty partial to Jerry and Jorma myself and Jorma is still playing and Steve Miller must belong on a list if it includes some of the other names I've seen.
Jorma made the airplane. He basically is Hot tuna and now he actually has a bluegrass album out. Garcia's style was so different that you might wriggle out of putting him on this list but it would be a travesty, unless maybe he got his own list. If all you have ever heard him play is the Dead you have missed a bunch.

speakerdave
02-26-2007, 05:51 PM
I think SpeakerDave got more than he bargained for...got all genre's with his request.

That'll fill up the pallet:applaud:
That's cool. It just means the seminar has become a party.

Thanks to everyone,

David

Thom
02-26-2007, 05:52 PM
Oh - don't forget Bill Nelson - guitar hero for BeBop Deluxe - http://www.astralwerks.com/be_bop_deluxe/intro.html

see Bill's homepage at http://www.billnelson.com/



- Who? :applaud:

You don't think so?

Thom
02-26-2007, 05:57 PM
If there was a "prettiest music from the ugliest guitar" award it would have to go to Willie Nelson. I don't know about technique and such but he pulls such melodious sound from such a poor raggedy falling apart looking guitar I find it amazing every time I see him play.

speakerdave
02-26-2007, 07:51 PM
Now that we've broadened this beyond rock, I've been following the Leo Kottke thread back: John Fahey, Peter Walker and the granddaddy of international string fusion and incredible string artistry in general: Sandy Bull--I have Inventions and Demolition Derby on vinyl, the first quite worn, the latter in quite good condition. John Fahey has made many albums; Peter Walker is a little hard to find; for Sandy Bull there's a best of the vanguard years compilation (Reinventions) that looks worthwhile.

David

Zilch
02-26-2007, 07:58 PM
Saw Sandy Bull at the Fillmore. He stuck a compression driver and horn up on a pole at the front of the crowd.

TERRIBLE! Damaged my hearing, probably.

Somehow, "Blend" is better on my well-worn vinyl than CD, also.... :thmbsup:

speakerdave
02-26-2007, 08:44 PM
My wife and I were just talking about the fact that musicians can sometimes be real dunces when it comes to sound systems. They just hear into the music and maybe have the ability to ignore all of the problems. They need to be saved from themselves. They need people who can hear them and also evaluate the quality of the sound system they use to present themselves. I just attended a festival of classical Indian music in Dehli; the music was quite wonderful, but, I'm sorry, but they should have asked me about those speakers.

David

Titanium Dome
02-27-2007, 04:01 AM
I'm talking the James Gang Joe Walsh, not so much the Eagles and later Joe Walsh.

His brilliant work on Funk #49 is legendary, and the "train wreck" segment at the end of Walk Away is still a classic.

As the booze, drugs, and brain damage mounted, IMO he became less rather than more of a great guitarist.

Titanium Dome
02-27-2007, 04:11 AM
I've got the Tommy Bolin compilation The Ultimate, and for many of his fans, that says it all. He rarely demonstrated the totality of his gift due to drug addiction and alcohol, and he died at a very young 25.

However his work with Bill Cobham on Billy's Spectrum album and the recently-released cuts from Tommy's band Energy show an amazing gift.

Titanium Dome
02-27-2007, 04:28 AM
Anyone who doesn't think this diminutive monarch can rock hasn't been paying attention. He's fast, melodic, and clean. He can bend a chord with the best of them. He's a guy who sounds every bit as good live--maybe better--as he does in the studio.

Fred Sanford
02-27-2007, 06:29 AM
I've got the Tommy Bolin compilation The Ultimate, and for many of his fans, that says it all. He rarely demonstrated the totality of his gift due to drug addiction and alcohol, and he died at a very young 25.

However his work with Bill Cobham on Billy's Spectrum album and the recently-released cuts from Tommy's band Energy show an amazing gift.

I've got the same compilation- his playing on Deep Purple's "Gettin' Tighter" got me looking for him. Unfortunately, I've got it the set on cassette and Spectrum on vinyl so they're not so accessible these days, but c'est la vie.

je

MJC
02-27-2007, 09:46 AM
James Burton comes to my mind. He played lead guitar for Rick Nelson, Elvis, John Denver, and along with the rest of Elvis' backup band, on Roy Orbison's black and White Night.

speakerdave
02-28-2007, 08:24 PM
Joe Satriani Live in San Francisco :rockon2: What I say! Thanks, Edgewound et.al.

David

GeneT
02-28-2007, 10:18 PM
Leo Kotke played a mean 12 sting but somewhere around I have a album that states to the effect of "Leo's voice does not appear on this album because it sounds like geese farts on a muggy day". Most of my folks I'd nominate already have but I would throw in the fellows from California Guitar Trio, Hideyo Moriya, Bert Lams and Paul Richards.

Allanvh5150
02-28-2007, 11:24 PM
I have been trying to fill in some gaps in my listening experience and CD collection and have been talking with some of my students who claim to have an interest in rock, and I've been following up on some of their suggestions with mixed results.

I'm specifically looking for outstanding lead guitar.

I was talking with one of my students the other day, and the idea came up that you could number the really great guitarists (rock) on the fingers of one hand. We agreed on Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton and Stevie Ray. We couldn't agree on the final two. Actually we couldn't think of two more who were in that category. Our working definition of "really great guitarist" was playing that goes way beyond technical skill and musicality to this: when they play improvisationally they stun you with the sheer flow of ideas. There are lots of applicants. Outside of the field of rock I would put Django in that league and possibly John McLaughlin, although I'm not so sure about that, and in blues Robert Johnson. There are lots of guitarists who may have been great, but their playing seems to lose its creative edge and lapse into self-mimicry (B.B.King, for example)

Anyway, this is an invitation to discuss "really good guitarists" who might potentially be upgraded to "really great." I would appreciate names, groups, recommended albums, even cuts. Performance DVD's would be of special interest. If you could say a little something about why you think your particular selections should be considered, that would be very helpful in developing a critical vocabulary.

Thanks,

David

Time for a first post. Having been a proffessional guitarist for far too long, I would rate my favourite players thus.

Edward Van Halen. Flambouyant, you are always wondering what he is gonna do next and he just keeps getting better and better. Listen to everything. He will always inspire.

Joe Satriani. I would rate as the "nicest" player on the planet. mm mm

Yngwie Malmsteen. Not really a favorite of mine, but listen to some of his baroque style playing.

It is real hard to say who the best is simply because there are so many different playing styles and not many players who can pull it all off. The most influentual player of the last 30 years would have to be Edward Van Halen. Of this I have no doubt. But my greatest player of all time would be Andrei Sergovia.

Bob Womack
03-01-2007, 02:39 AM
Wow. Five pages and no one has mentioned Steve Howe of YES. His style is instantly recognizable. He was the first to be awarded Guitar player Magazine's lifetime achievement award after he won the best overall guitarist too many years in a row.

Bob

jim campbell
03-01-2007, 03:26 AM
d'oh :banghead:

Tom Brennan
03-01-2007, 10:05 AM
Scotty Moore. Steve Cropper. I'm glad somebody remembered James Burton.

George Harrison was so good too.

And God Bless Johnny Ramone for reminding us that one could be a great rock and roll guitar player without playing leads.

jblnut
03-01-2007, 10:11 AM
Terry Kath of Chicago was something else. I often dig out Chicago II to listen to his incredible playing throughout this double LP (Chicago's best IMO). Check him out on "25 or 6 to 4."


Amen ! Other standouts include the 4 LP "Live at Carnegie Hall" set and "Chicago V", both of which see regular playing on my turntable.



John Mayer is a tremendously talented young player who has mysteriously escaped the talent filter of the current pop music scene and risen to the top. I could do without all the screaming teenage girls in his live stuff, but man, that kid can play with soul, in his own voice.


I was literally blown away watching Clapton's "Crossroads" festival DVD set. After over 5 hours of seeing everyone from BB King to Clapton to Eric Johnson, here's this young preppy looking kid complete with the Polo shirt and upturned collar. I'm thinking "OK, who is this kid and why did Eric invite him", then he starts to play. MAN can this kid play - and not just another lead guitar wanker. He's got the groove, big time. I picked up his live CD "TRY" the other day and even though the sound quality is not great, I really like listening to it.


A lot of great guitarists have already been mentioned here, but I'll add a few more just for the sake of completeness....

Los Lonely Boys - check out Henry who somehow manages to channel Hendrix, Stevie Ray and Santata without sounding like a clone. They're amazing and will be even more so in 10 or 20 years.

Gamalon - who you ask ? The best fusion band you never heard, unless you frequented the Buffalo/Rochester bar scene in the 90's. I've seen just about every guitar player on this list in my life and no one, NO ONE, can play like Georgo Puelo. If you like instrumental fusion (closer to Rock, like Satriani), you need to pick up some of their CD's. "Aerial View" is a must, as is their self-titled debut. As good as the CD's are, they don't capture what he can do live. I wish he was still with them....

Frank Zappa - no mention of guitar greats is complete without the grand master. Take a listen to "Roxy and Elsewhere" and marvel at his tasteful style and blistering speed. We miss ya Frank !

Adrian Belew - He played with Frank in his younger days then King Crimson after that. His music is a little out there, but he can make magic with a guitar in his hands.

Jimmy Herring - another favorite of mine. Check him out on some early Aquarium Rescue Unit CD's (like Perfect World) or see him live with latest incarnation of The (Grateful) Dead. Another dazzling combination of chops, skill, style and restraint.

Birelli Lagrene - a French gypsy guitarist that plays mostly accoustic jazz. But for a little while in the late 80's he plugged in and turned it up. Check out "Foreign Affairs" or "Inferno" for some blazing fusion guitar mixed with some of his nicer solo acoustic material.

There's so many more but I'm out of time. PM me if you like this kind of music and I can recommend some others.


jblnut

Fred Sanford
03-01-2007, 10:23 AM
A.S = Andres Segovia

C.M. = Carlos Montoya

What about Leona Boyd?

What about Paco De Lucia?

What about....yes, that's right...Charo? coochie coochie...:applaud: :D

For an extremely compelling and fun live acoustic classical record, get "Friday Night in San Francisco" with Al DiMeola, John McLaughlin and Paco De Lucia....amazing.

If you're veering towards classical, look for John Williams, too. Amsterdam Guitar Trio has an impressive 'Four Seasons'.

Ragtime on guitar, Giovanni De Chiaro.

Latin, try Johannes Linstead, Jesse Cook, Strunz & Farah...I'll think of more.

Christmas on guitar: De Chiaro and a personal favorite: Lewis Ross (get it while you can).

je

edgewound
03-01-2007, 01:03 PM
Wow....lotsa great names...yeah..Steve Howe is awesome and I forgot about the newer Yes guitarist...

Trevor Rabin.

Wornears
03-01-2007, 01:34 PM
Saw Clarence White on this list, but didn't see Tony Rice (David Grisman band, etc.)

Good to see Danny Gatton recognized too. Incredible player.

Haven't seen Denny Freeman mentioned. He was the prime guitarist in the "Paul Ray and The Cobras" band out of '70s Austin. The punk "flash" kid in that band was SRV -- Freeman mentored him. Saw them a number of times. Great honkin' blues/soul band. Freeman has also been in Lou Ann Barton's bands.

Haven't seen Cesar Rosas or David Hildalgo of Los Lobos mentioned.

Eddie Shaver, who was mentored by Dickie Betts, was a grand talent when he played with his dad, Billie Joe. But an overdose took him.

Dave Alvin of The Blasters.

Eddie Angel of Los Straitjackets.

Regis
03-01-2007, 03:07 PM
I gotta say, this was a great thread and I've now got some CD's to hunt down, thanks to jblnut. I agree with Ti Dome, Prince is pretty damn good. Most of his music is mastered so cleanly. The detail shines through and it just sounds absolutely bitchin' through my system. Solid bass and drums that just pound! I just discovered the Prince CD in my girlfriends collection and remembering some of the better songs, said 'what the heck'? Worth a listen.

A lot of good pics, but surprisingly, nobody mentioned the Schenkers, Michael or Rudy. I have the breakthrough album by the Scorpions, "Intrance". Rudy is playing here and there is some pretty serious 'guitar' talking. Robot Man, Evening Wind and other songs just wail, with very good guitar solos walking up and down the scale and just laying it down! To be honest, I believe this to be their best album, even over the later goods.

edgewound
03-01-2007, 03:59 PM
UFO

grumpy
03-01-2007, 06:47 PM
No Rick Nielsen? No Bill Frisell? ... the list is (fortunately) endless :applaud:

-grumpy

Thom
03-01-2007, 07:34 PM
John Cipollino Quicksilver Messenger Service

Fred Sanford
03-02-2007, 02:21 PM
Just listened to two of his albums- check out Oz Noy. Lots of Scofield influence, I also hear Gatton and Hellecasters in there among others. Very strong supporting band, too, lots of heavy hitters.

http://www.oznoy.com/

Look for some live vid here, too:

http://www.guitarplayertv.com/

je

JBLRaiser
03-02-2007, 07:28 PM
Johnny Lang? I've got 'Lie To Me'. Damn good for a teenager. Good voice, too.

jim campbell
03-03-2007, 07:51 AM
joe pass,virtuoso
lets not forget keith richards and ron wood
david rawlings.....jerry douglas..........buddy miller.........three superb and tasteful players

SEAWOLF97
03-03-2007, 08:24 AM
that Korean girl in the video will be awesome someday...:applaud:

spwal
03-04-2007, 07:27 PM
umm al shiener from moe. is on his way to legenday guitar status. if you havent seen moe. live, then you need to. they are the second coming fo the great ones.

jam rock/ improvisational/ heavy moe.tal

mbask
03-05-2007, 07:39 PM
Denny, and Skunk.:applaud:

Oldmics
03-05-2007, 10:35 PM
Skunk when he was with the Doobies

WOW !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

mbask
03-06-2007, 12:33 AM
When I was seventeen, me and my girl friend (@that time) would listen to Doobie Brothers Greatest Hits over and over. I was not reading liner notes as much as Finer notes...if you get my drift. Now that you mention Skunk with Doobs, I can't say that I know which songs he was on. I'll have to reanalyze by memory because I don't have any Doobie Bros. presently.:hmm:

Rock Me In Your Arms? .....always thought that was Simmons.

John
03-06-2007, 01:16 AM
Prince??? I have to say he has got some of the ugliest guitars I have ever seen!!!:barf:

I think they are his own design. I am so glad they never caught on with the other players.

jim campbell
03-06-2007, 08:05 AM
Prince??? I have to say he has got some of the ugliest guitars I have ever seen!!!:barf:

I think they are his own design. I am so glad they never caught on with the other players.ever seen that bass that chris squire had?looked like some kind of driftwood sculpture

rockin'rushmore
03-07-2007, 05:11 PM
No mention of Lindsey Buckingham? Good stuff

jim campbell
03-07-2007, 05:37 PM
yes,but there are so many great players now and we have better access to them than could be dreamed of even 15 years ago that its easy to see how some could be lost in the shuffle.on any given day my top 100 list would probably differ by 50% based on what i was into that day.

whizzer
03-09-2007, 08:29 AM
An earlier post said, " George Harrison was so good too."
I couldn't agree more--the right note in the right place with the right space around it--not flashy, not calling attention to itself--clean, economical, and well-chosen, in short, just musical. He was, in my opinion, the Japanese Brush Stroke master of pop guitar.

jblnut
03-27-2007, 08:13 AM
I just got an email from a friend of mine who used to travel out to Buffalo with me to see Gamalon back in the late 80's. We made a video of them at a bar in Rochester on one of these trips, but it was back in the pre-hi-fi camcorder days. I managed to find the tape about 5 years ago and I digitized it on my computer before it was lost forever. We sent along a copy to the band and that was the last I heard about it.

Until today that is. Turns out Ted (the drummer) is teaching now and one of his students took the videos we made and put them up on youtube. Most of the concert we recorded is up there now, as well as a lot of the newer stuff. Take 5 minutes and check this out if you're into some serious fusion guitar wizardry. Somehow their talent transcends the rather pedestrian recording effort.

George Puleo as he looked and sounded almost 20 years ago. Was it worth a 6 hour car ride each way to see them ? You decide....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WBTmoepUukc&mode=related&search=


jblnut

jim campbell
03-27-2007, 05:27 PM
i did 17 hours each way to see kronos quartet in london on a standing room bus with a ferry ride across the irish sea in london from county kerry.the quartets of alfred schnidke were well worth it.

HipoFutura
03-27-2007, 06:01 PM
Edgar Winter!!!!!!!!!!!!! About the only guy who can show Clapton and SRV how's it's done! Don

spwal
03-27-2007, 06:13 PM
um. al shiner from moe. is the wickedest guitarist on the planet.

Steve Mac
03-27-2007, 06:16 PM
There are great guitar players but there is only one Wes Montgomery.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gPJMfC2cdEI

If he interests you and you've never bought one of his CDs,
check out Boss Guitar, I love the version he did of Besame Mucho
and Dearly Beloved. The work he did with his brothers
is pretty special. One album called "The Grooveyard" features
Wes and his brothers. There is an insane song on there called "Delirious".
His work with Jimmy Smith on "The Dynamic Duo" is unmatched to this day.
One other cut is the version of "Twisted Blues" he did on the "Goin' Out of My Head" album.

I heard Chet Atkins mentioned along with Mark Knopler.
I second the notion. The album they did together, "Neck and Neck"
is one of the most easy and beautiful sounding and wonderfully recorded
albums ever.

Special note on Knopler. It's just my opinion, but he became even better
after his time with Chet...they were pretty good friends.
Anyway, for Knopler at his best, check out "The Ragpicker's Dream".
This Xmas eve...play the title track...it'll make you cry.
The recording of this CD is especially good, one of the best I've ever heard.

Earl Klugh: If you don't have this CD, get it NOW!!!!
http://www.amazon.com/Earl-Klugh-Trio-Vol-1/dp/B000002LRI
3 piece, stand up bass, guitar and drums. For some reason this is the
only album by Klugh that I completely adore...every song...every riff.

I heard Joe Satriani mentioned who I love too. If you don't like shredders
and pyrotechnics but you want to here one of the coolest guitar songs
ever, check out Joe playing "You're My World"

Jeff Beck playing Diamond Dust off of Blow by Blow still creeps me out to this day. Absolutely fascinating song and artist.

I saw Larry Carlton in Franklin Tennessee 6-7 years ago in a free, live
outdoor concert in the town square on a beautiful September night.
I don't have any words...it was beyond words...

Chuck Berry...as technically lacking as he is...he makes music and
sounds magical when he's on. One of the best.

If you wanna hear someone new who is a freak, check out Guthrie Govan:
move over Larry carlton....just kidding...but dam!!!! :)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bUZK9dasP8s

I failed to mention a lot of other great guitar players...

Titanium Dome
03-27-2007, 07:19 PM
George Puleo as he looked and sounded almost 20 years ago. Was it worth a 6 hour car ride each way to see them ? You decide....


jblnut

Depends. What was the cover charge? :p

Just kidding, they sound good. Nice piece of preservation work.

oldschool
03-27-2007, 10:46 PM
robin trower,ain't bad.

Fred Sanford
03-28-2007, 04:40 AM
If you wanna hear someone new who is a freak, check out Guthrie Govan:
move over Larry carlton....just kidding...but dam!!!! :)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bUZK9dasP8s

I failed to mention a lot of other great guitar players...

NICE! Thanks for that, he's worth looking up. Any advice on discs he's released?

je

roads31
03-28-2007, 06:47 AM
Hi All,
My 2 cents on a few:

Rory Gallagher's "Million Miles Away" and "I waonder who" from Irish tour '74

Michael Schenker with UFO in "Rock Bottom" from Strangers in the Night

Peter Frampton live

And of course me being a proud father, my son Garrett in "Hand scribbled blues song"

I love guitar, or any instrument that is played live with raw gut wrenching passion.

Steve Mac
03-28-2007, 05:37 PM
NICE! Thanks for that, he's worth looking up. Any advice on discs he's released?

je

He's just about to hit major fame any minute now.
He has a CD called "Erotic Cakes" with an independent label.
I have not heard it:
http://www.cornfordrecords.com/shop.php?html

Here's a link to a forum dedicated to him already and
there are comments on this release:
http://online-discussion.dhenderson.com/GuthrieGovan/

I understand there's a possibility he may end up on Satch's G3 tour.
He's the real thing...

Krunchy
04-01-2007, 07:59 AM
There are so many great guitarists that this is a very difficult task. as somone mentioned the guitar work on Lou Reed's rock & roll animal is excellent. Please do not forget Mark Knopfler alone or with Dire Straits (his album with Chet Atkins is very good and Funny).
David Gilmore of pink floyd, his two solo albums, David Gilmore and About Face, both have great guitar work and are highly underrated.
The Steely Dan albums are chock full or fantastic examples including the great guitarist Larry Carlton.

Doc Watson for you bluegrass fans.
For those interested in jazz you cannot leave out Wes Montgomery w/the winton kelly trio "smokin' at the half note" must be listened to.
Kenny Burrell's montono blues is just incredible in its simplicity but it grooves like you wouldnt believe, thats on Bluesy Burrell.
Joe Pass/John Pisano's album Duets is just gorgeous, very mellow.
Lee Rittenour's Stolen Moments is another underrate gem
Those of you a little more adveturous there is an english chap named Ronny Jordan that really pushes the boundaries with his virtuous jazz guitar playing ala Wes but more modernised, be warned though, he blends elements of rap but it is not a rap album. it is something entirely different and difficult to explain, lots of instrumentals. His first five cds are interesting.

This list can go on and on but I will leave it at that. for now!

speakerdave
04-22-2007, 10:45 PM
Finally got a chance today to go through the DVD of Crossroads Guitar Festival. All I can say is, THANK YOU, to everyone who has suggested it. I'm sure those of you who are familiar don't need to be reminded about the cast leaders. If you don't have it, it's highly recommended. In a way it was exactly the overview I was looking for, with some nice surprises.

One was Buddy Guy, who is the first guitarist of any generation I've ever seen make Clapton feel surrounded.

And it's always really sweet and sad when the old blues players are given a spot.

Another was V.M. Bhatt playing his self-designed cross of a vina and a lap guitar. I've enjoyed hearing him on a couple of CD's and was fortunate enough to hear him in person playing at a music festival in India a couple of months ago. There is a history of Indian musicians being given spots at rock festivals, Ravi Shankar specifically, who generally played a pretty straight offering of traditional Indian music or did a thing with jazz style playing. Bhatt really got out there with his instrument and his playing--coming at the east-west synthesis from the other side toward where Sandy Bull and his heirs were reaching.

Then there's extra-terrestrial Steve Vai. He's basically the polar opposite of everything I appreciate about music, but I actually watched the cut twice just to make sure I wasn't hallucinating. I especially could have done without the circlejerk bit, but generally it was all harmless enough. A touch of comic relief, I guess.

But the real kernel:

. . . . John Mayer is a tremendously talented young player who has mysteriously escaped the talent filter of the current pop music scene and risen to the top. I could do without all the screaming teenage girls in his live stuff, but man, that kid can play with soul, in his own voice. . . .
Yep. Quite remarkable. I've only seen or met one other person along that vein. I knew him well when he was in his twenties, and he was a lot like John Mayer. I won't go into it, but he's now known around the world by a select audience for what he does. John Mayer has got his planets lined up, singing harmony.

The one near-disappointment was one of my favorite musicians in the day--John McLaughlin. He came out alone, with just two drummers, one on tabla, and the other with a rock kit. He's gotten so cerebral I was afraid he'd never connect; actually, he didn't, really, except that you'd have to say the audience reached out to him. He needs more musicians to bounce ideas with. Luckily he realized it was going nowhere and gave to the drummers (wish I knew their names), who worked really hard to make something happen, and after considerable exertion did, sorta. The guy is spending too much time sitting in his Paris apartment playing alone. He needs to go to a few monster truck rallies, drink some beers, eat a few hotdogs. Hey, John, hang in there.

A really fine straight-ahead performance by J.J. Cale.

I also have to mention another new one for me, Larry Carlton, does a good thing, smooth, cool and strong.

Overall a tremendous feast, a good audience, and a great cause, and some amazing guitarists.

Thanks,

David

BMWCCA
04-23-2007, 08:37 AM
Finally got a chance today to go through the DVD of Crossroads Guitar Festival. All I can say is, THANK YOU, to everyone who has suggested it. I'm sure those of you who are familiar don't need to be reminded about the cast leaders. If you don't have it, it's highly recommended. In a way it was exactly the overview I was looking for, with some nice surprises.

But the real kernel:

Yep. Quite remarkable. I've only seen or met one other person along that vein. I knew him well when he was in his twenties, and he was a lot like John Mayer. I won't go into it, but he's now known around the world by a select audience for what he does. John Mayer has got his planets lined up, singing harmony.

Glad you found the suggestion among the inundation of names that followed my post:

You've hit some good ones! How 'bout Derek Trucks (just ask Clapton), John Mayer (if you've not seen him on the Crossroads Guitar Festival DVD, don't pre-judge him, and oh yeah, ask Clapton...), and I'll toss Mato Nangi in there for good measure (Indigenous). Not saying this is his best, but it is a sample: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N3sQptZcKr8

Also:Mayer at Crossroads here. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6sPmTgPvx28)

And probably anything from Al Di Meola, depending on your taste.

And of course Larry Carlton is nearly as important a figure in early Steely Dan as was Walter Becker. I've been a fan for decades.

Yeah, Mayer is underrated, for sure, but his latest CD (Continuum) is so full of over-effected drum distortions as to make it nearly un-listenable on a good system. Seems they worked it to sound like an over-driven car sub right out of the box. Good work on the songs and the limited lead-guitar play but I can only take so much of it outside the car environment. I'm glad you found him on "Crossroads" and that you, Steve, and I (at least) agree on his talent. I'll keep trying to find him playing lead as much as he did at Crossroads. I don't recommend his "Trio" album at all. Maybe I'll try it again after the long rest I've given it.

So, what did you think of Johnny Lang's contribution?

SEAWOLF97
04-23-2007, 08:57 AM
Has anybody mentioned Carlos Santana ?

hjames
04-23-2007, 09:22 AM
Has anybody mentioned Carlos Santana ?

No - but fawgawd's sake - don't forget Carlos Santana!

he he he

jblnut
04-23-2007, 12:12 PM
Yeah, Mayer is underrated, for sure, but his latest CD (Continuum) is so full of over-effected drum distortions as to make it nearly un-listenable on a good system. Seems they worked it to sound like an over-driven car sub right out of the box. Good work on the songs and the limited lead-guitar play but I can only take so much of it outside the car environment. I'm glad you found him on "Crossroads" and that you, Steve, and I (at least) agree on his talent. I'll keep trying to find him playing lead as much as he did at Crossroads. I don't recommend his "Trio" album at all. Maybe I'll try it again after the long rest I've given it.


His "Try" live album with the trio is also a veritable what not do to of recording and mixing. I suppose it's adequate for teenage girls using ipods, but the better the stereo you listen to it on, the worse it sounds. The guy needs to hang out with some better engineers, and quick !

I need to send him a copy of Robben Ford's "Authorized Bootleg" so he can hear what a good low-budget soundboard mix of a live blues trio is supposed to sound like :) .

jblnut

sdaniel
04-27-2007, 11:46 AM
Rather, Jonathan Edwards.

Mostly known to East Coasters and Bluegrass fans, the guy always makes me smile.


Having one big hit, "Sunshine", he should have been mentioned sooner, Id think, but hey.


His album with The Seldom Scene, "Blue Ridge" is just beautiful.


http://www.jonathanedwards.net/_pages/music.php

brutal
04-27-2007, 12:05 PM
I know they're an "acquired" taste, much like Zappa :), but Rush's early work has some outstanding guitar work.

JBLRaiser
04-27-2007, 06:11 PM
Here's Satriani, Vai and Malmsteen 3G live in Denver doing Hendrix's 'Little Wing'. <<<<<<<WOW>>>>>>

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3vlAPYdv5e8

John
04-27-2007, 06:39 PM
Here's Satriani, Vai and Malmsteen 3G live in Denver doing Hendrix's 'Little Wing'. <<<<<<<WOW>>>>>>

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3vlAPYdv5e8


Scored the whole DVD at best buy a few years ago for $9.99

Love it:bouncy:

speakerdave
04-27-2007, 06:55 PM
Has anybody mentioned Carlos Santana ?
Yes, Heather mentioned him early in the thread. I do like him and have been replaying the sides I have (Abraxas; Love, Devotion, Surrender). At the suggestion of Heather (and others) I picked up a CD of Caravanserai and have been through that a couple of times. Good stuff. I also enjoyed his performance at Crossroads.

David

pelly3s
04-27-2007, 08:15 PM
Alright first off I just skimmed this to catch up but I would have to say I didnt see a single person meantion Mr. Scary himself, George Lynch. He is one of the top in my book. I did see a Trower meantion in here somewhere too the album Bridge of Sighs was one of the greatest.

Then there is always Jeff Beck and the Who Else album which has some very great tracks. Space for Papa has some of the best guitar tone I have ever heard.

Another I have to put up high on my list would be Shannon Curfman she is just a great player for being so young.

Finally if anyone is looking for a great album check out Maximum Security by Tony MacAlpine. He is always forgetting about when talking of greats.

Oh you for the hell of it anything Buckethead does is worth a meantion. And for just pure speed Michael "Angelo" Batio wins it all

indycraft
04-27-2007, 11:08 PM
[quote=jblnut;153969]Amen ! Other standouts include the 4 LP "Live at Carnegie Hall" set and "Chicago V", both of which see regular playing on my turntable.


I am happy to see two people mention the late Terry Kath. My favorite Chicago tune is "Introduction" from their first album "Chicago Transit Authority". They had to shorten their name to "Chicago" under threat from the Chicago Transit Authority. Although I don't play guitar....I would listen to that song over and over again just to study the guitar solo.

His guitar work on "I Don't Want Your Money" from #3 is another favorite of mine. You get an idea of Terry's enthusiam because the cut starts with Terry getting charged up for the take. You can hear off mic chatter at the end of the take again hearing Terry's enthusiam as well as someone asking "Is he f++ked up?"

Had Terry not died of an accidental self-inflicted gunshot...I believe Chicago would not have gone into ballad land and he would have made it onto more people's "lists" of all time great guitar players.

brutal
04-28-2007, 09:47 AM
Here's Satriani, Vai and Malmsteen 3G live in Denver doing Hendrix's 'Little Wing'. <<<<<<<WOW>>>>>>



Nice, but I prefer Stevie Ray's version on The Sky is Crying... :applaud:

JBLRaiser
04-28-2007, 10:04 PM
Nice, but I prefer Stevie Ray's version on The Sky is Crying... :applaud:
I do too.:bouncy:

BMWCCA
04-29-2007, 05:04 AM
Rather, Jonathan Edwards.
Mostly known to East Coasters and Bluegrass fans, the guy always makes me smile.
Having one big hit, "Sunshine", he should have been mentioned sooner, Id think, but hey.
His album with The Seldom Scene, "Blue Ridge" is just beautiful.
http://www.jonathanedwards.net/_pages/music.phpMight not get much recognition here among the other great pickers but I've been a fan since 1971, still have a huge button with the "Sailboat" logo from a concert from that period, repurchased much of his work on CD directly from his site (always support a good cause), and saw him in an intimate concert in Charlottesville, VA a year or so ago. He hasn't missed a step in over thirty years, which is more than can be said for lots of older performers. Seeing him live really showcased his talent on the guitar. What I'll always thank him for is introducing my family to his opening act and accompanist, Kenny White, who's an incredible talent as a songwriter, singer, producer, and keyboard player.

Just thought I'd let sdaniel know someone appreciates his contribution to the thread!

Ducatista47
04-29-2007, 06:22 PM
OK, what a huge topic and what great coverage. Still, I can think of a couple.

One of the greatest living acoustic players to hear is Ralph Towner. He's an American who now lives in Italy. His latest is (I think) Timeline, ECM 1968. His ECM offerings go way back. His pickup group called Solstice put out two great albums in the early seventies, still in print on cd. And yes, he is the guy in Oregon. No one else sounds anything like him. He is also part of some other killer jazz colaborations with Europeans.

I have been to two live acoustic gigs of John Renbourn's. In one he performed with Stefan Grossman. Both are beyond talented and Renbourn is inspired.

I vigorously second Leo Kottke and Willie Nelson as living gods of acoustic Mt. Olympus. Nelson kinda hurries through his gigs now, but when he took his time he was unique, understated and wonderful. Leo Kottke - a gift from above, please enjoy and support him.

I also second the sainthood of Carlos Santana. Jeff Beck is only the best living electric guitarist still playing in top form. Other than that he's no big deal.:D

Guys not mentioned could include Kim Simmons (Savoy Brown); and Neil Young, who has shown that simple playing with real feeling can produce quite a few of the best solos ever recorded.

But - what compelled me to post here were two huge omissions.

The early work of Peter Green. He was the best guitarist I ever heard in person, and that includes Jeff Beck and some of the legends of jazz, too. For you younger folks, the original name of the band was Peter Green's Fleetwood Mac. Later Mac, don't forget to check Danny Kirwan on Morning Rain (album is Future Games). No surprise, Danny came from a group called Boilerhouse.

The other guy is the "died way too young" guitarist I miss the most, more than Jimi and SRV even. He was an enormous influence on a lot of later musicians, whether they know it or not. Like Green, he was just as good with chords as with single string playing. James Honeyman Scott can only be heard on the first two Pretenders albums and their EP, Extended Play. Pretenders II is my desert island pick. Enough said.

Clark in Peoria

hjames
04-29-2007, 06:53 PM
I'm a big Ralph Towner fan ... his work goes back even further - to the Paul Winter Consort. Look for their 1969 album "Road" for the earliest version of his classic instrumental "Icarus".
That version of the Winter Consort consists of cellist David Darling (a future ECM star) and four musicians who would leave and form Oregon: guitarist Ralph Towner, Paul McCandless (heard here on oboe and English horn), bassist Glen Moore, and Colin Walcott on tabla and percussion.

Newest stuff of his I have is from '98 - but its still fine playing

Peter Green is a sad story - I have heard some of his newer work but none of it has the spark of that early Fleetwood Mac Blues Band - I think years of personal demons took their toll.



OK, what a huge topic and what great coverage. Still, I can think of a couple.

One of the greatest living acoustic players to hear is Ralph Towner. He's an American who now lives in Italy. His latest is (I think) Timeline, ECM 1968. His ECM offerings go way back. His pickup group called Solstice put out two great albums in the early seventies, still in print on cd. And yes, he is the guy in Oregon. No one else sounds anything like him. He is also part of some other killer jazz colaborations with Europeans.

Clark in Peoria

LRBacon
04-30-2007, 08:07 AM
Nice, but I prefer Stevie Ray's version on The Sky is Crying... :applaud:
DITTO


Larry

whizzer
05-01-2007, 08:42 AM
Oh you for the hell of it anything Buckethead does is worth a mention. And for just pure speed Michael "Angelo" Batio wins it all

With the possible exception of Alvin Lee (Ten Years After). It's always been amazing to me that Mr. Lightning Fingers Lee could play so swiftly yet produce notes that are round and full, with a beginning, middle, and end, without a hint of slurring.

richluvsound
05-01-2007, 10:18 AM
I could end up on a few ignore lists for this , but here goes. How about Jeff Beck, Jimmy Page.That Jimi Hendrix fella..... Phil Manzinara, The Edge from U2, bloody silly name , granted, but a frett master nonetheless. A shame U2 spent money on Steve Lillywhite production I would love Trevor Horn to produce them.Vinni Riley from Durriti Column. Micheal Hedges, PAT METHENY. now this man , although Jazz, is up there with that silly bugger that overdosed before his prime.Carlos Santana. William Orbit, the first Strange Cargo "Jump Jet" its worth 2.08 off anyone's time.

Thats my 2 pence worth! I'm gonna check some the names from the previous threads and see what delights you have introduced me to !

thanks,Rich:D

MJC
05-03-2007, 08:14 AM
Speaking of Fleetwood Mac, have we added Lindsey Buckingham?
I saw Lindsey, on MHD a couple of days ago, playing with Little Big Town.

BMWCCA
05-03-2007, 08:23 AM
Speaking of Fleetwood Mac, have we added Lindsey Buckingham?
I saw Lindsey, on MHD a couple of days ago, playing with Little Big Town.And you still want to add him to this august list? :rolleyes:

;)

MJC
05-03-2007, 08:34 AM
And you still want to add him to this august list? :rolleyes:

;)
They were playing both Little Big Town songs and old Fleetwood Mac songs, finishing with "Go Your Own Way"

Jakob
06-20-2007, 05:41 PM
Have to mention three unmentioned favourites: Steve Lukather (Toto) and Phil Lynnott (Thin Lizzy) and Janne Schaffer.

SEAWOLF97
11-12-2007, 06:22 PM
I dont know if you can call him "lead guitar" , but I was listening to ROBERT CRAY today and he is phenominal , especially the last 2 minutes of "I was warned" .....WOW...:applaud:

spwal
11-12-2007, 06:28 PM
Get learned.

www.moe.org (http://www.moe.org)

Ducatista47
08-12-2008, 10:34 PM
I know he was mentioned in I think the sixth post of this thread, but may I elaborate. I keep hearing his name pop up again and again from music lovers who's taste I respect, so I have been checking him out.

His DVD The Derek Trucks Band - Songlines Live is a revelation. Here he is at Park West in Chicago in January 2006. He has only one guitar, a nice Gibson SG. First I noticed he is not a slide specialist. Then I noticed he is not a specialist at all. He plays a richly broad palette of electric guitar styles and then some. There is something really spooky going on. The solid body Humbucker SG sounds a lot like a big f-hole Gibson archtop when he plays a jazz riff. It sounds like a strat when asked to. How does he do that? Since his tone changes in mid bar if he wants it to, it has to be his hands on the strings and the guitar volume controls. I don't think he was fiddling with the tone controls much. You guitarists know how much range you can get by adjusting only volume controls and attack, but this is way beyond anything I have heard elsewhere in this regard. I can tell you Derek does not use any effects at all, plugging straight into the amp.

Now move on to the Crossroads Guitar Festival 2007 DVD. His appearance as a leader begins his work for the day, but then he joins Eric Clapton's band in the last section of the concert and all hell breaks loose - if you know what to look for. The Park West concert showed he could do almost anything, and do it better than pretty much anyone else can. Here they proceed to do Tell The Truth and he does, among many other things, what I thought no guitarist could do. He effortlessly picks up Duane Allman's parts and - forgive me - does even better than Duane, a towering musical hero of mine, himself did. Of course at this point Derek has had more time to be Duane than Duane had. The two real veterans in the band from the "beforetime", Eric Clapton and the great Chris Stainton, who really have seen it all, actually stare in awe at the young guitarist producing the spectacle. To be honest it seems neither can quite believe what they are hearing despite an earlier rehearsal. At first I thought they were looking for a Que, but it does look more like, "Who is this guy?"

From then on Derek is clearly in a class of his own whenever he is featured, even in this company. He comes so close to doing it all that I think only Jeff Beck breaks the spell of omnipitance. Jeff, love him or hate him, is the best living electric guitar player on the Earth and what he can do may never be repeated. Steve Winwood was the other really high spot of the evening for me, but I feel if Derek went that way too he could probably do that as well.

Is the man who does almost any style better than anyone else the best lead guitarist there is? Other than Jeff, I think so. I believe Derek could, if he chose to, even pick up James Honeyman Scott's legacy, and I can't think of anyone else who could that, ever. If it turns out he could play like Peter Green, and I have no doubt he could do OK with Jimi, I think whoever is in charge should give up and place the crown on his head.

I can't believe how young he is. There is a lot of music to look forward to.:)

Clark, Who Has Found Another Hero

SEAWOLF97
06-09-2018, 08:28 AM
.
https://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/former-fleetwood-mac-guitarist-danny-kirwan-dead-at-68-w521317

Triumph Don
06-12-2018, 04:09 PM
No - but fawgawd's sake - don't forget Carlos Santana!

he he he

One of my all time favs, the Santana-John McLaughlin album Love Devotion Surrender back in the Sri Chinmoy motivated era. Saw them do it live, one of my favorite shows ever! Several minutes of battling hot rodders back and forth, some slow some fast. A classic