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eyedoc
01-24-2007, 07:55 AM
Greetings
It is time to upgrade my HT preamp, and I would be interested in some opinions regarding my options. I currently have a Sherwood Newcastle AVP-9080R AV Tuner/PreAmp. The sound quality for the HT settings are great, but the 2 channel sound is fairly lame (actually, it sucks). I have the choice of running older Adcom or McIntosh amps (have both options). I am also looking into both Rotel and Parasound as other purchasable options. For speakers, I have L100t3's for the front, and L60tís for center and rear.

I am looking at the following options: (all under $1000)
Parasound AVC 2500 (used)
Rotel RSP 1066 (used)
B&K Reference 30 (used)
Adcom 860 II (demo)
Outlaw 970 (new)

I am open to all opinions, esp from actual users of the above equipment.
Thank you in advance,
Kevin.

Titanium Dome
01-24-2007, 08:44 AM
The used market is a treasure trove of great pre/pros, although you might miss the absolute latest development. (Who cares? I don't.)

I've heard all those, and without getting too long-winded, I'd list them thusly.

Rotel RSP 1066 (used)
Outlaw 970 (new)
Parasound AVC 2500 (used)
Adcom 860 II (demo)
B&K Reference 30 (used)

For me, the B&K unfortunately would be a nonstarter due to electronics problems experienced by both owners I know. B&K claims to have diagnosed and fixed the problem, but what if the one you get isn't fixed?

If you like the Outlaw, I'd say buy new just to have the security of a warranty. IMO the Rotel is more musical. The Parasound is good (but it looks ugly to me) and the Adcom is okay.

Don C
01-24-2007, 09:58 AM
I have the exact same Sherwood AVP-9080 processor. Did you know that you can enable six channel direct mode for playing regular CDs? I just put CDs in the dvd player and they play in stereo. I'm happy with the two channel sound of my processor, I can't actually tell any difference between six channel direct with the DVD input and the regular stereo input for the CD player, but it's nice to have the bypass anyway.

Mr. Widget
01-24-2007, 10:31 AM
The sound quality for the HT settings are great, but the 2 channel sound is fairly lame (actually, it sucks).

I haven't heard anything from Outlaw, and none of Rotel's HT offerings, but I have heard several examples from the other mentioned lines and found all of them pretty much useless for 2 channel. They all do a fine job in surround sound where having sounds coming at you from all directions masks any lack of detail and imaging... if you are after a really high quality 2 channel experience, I'd be surprised if the Outlaw and Rotel stack up against the better used 2-channel non DSP equipment that is readily available.

It is a hassle, but if high quality 2 channel reproduction is important to you, you can use a separate 2 channel preamp with your Sherwood. I do this with my B+K. I basically run the mains as a stand alone stereo system and feed one input on my stereo preamp from the B+K. When I listen to CDs or vinyl, I don't use the B+K or the other amps... this does add an additional line stage for the front Left and Right speakers during surround sound, but who cares... it gives me a very pure 2 channel system when I want to listen to music. Once you determine the proper gain structure to match your system, the only real hassle is turning on one additional piece of gear and remembering to reset the gain every time you switch back to surround mode.

If you go this route, you can pick up a fine 2 channel preamp for $500 or less and keep your Sherwood and the amps you already have.


Widget

boputnam
01-24-2007, 11:14 AM
It is a hassle, but if high quality 2 channel reproduction is important to you, you can use a separate 2 channel preamp... Once you determine the proper gain structure to match your system, the only real hassle is turning on one additional piece of gear and remembering to reset the gain every time you switch back to surround mode.I like this solution. It avoids all the processing of surround sound - none of which has ever satisfied / impressed me.

Michael Smith
01-24-2007, 04:18 PM
Hey Eyedoc
Have you considered buying a HT Receiver, like a Denon AVR2307/2807 (these nos are Aussie/European) and using only the Pre/Pro section that would make life alittle easier.
Widgets' idea is a good one if you can be bothered with all the rooting around.At the end of the day your HT Receiver will be worth more than an out moded processor.Also the video section will be far superior and that is food for thought.
Have fun
Regards
Michael

Guy in WNY
01-24-2007, 05:14 PM
Mr. Widgets method is what I will use when I do get a HT setup. I would not want to do it any other way. It's been my plan to build it out that way all along. I've been looking for a low-cost HT (rack mountable) that has L-R main outputs, but it's not a high priority at this time, and I've nowhere to look except big-box stores in WNY unless you want to spend mega-bucks from a "real" stereo store. TOO MUCH FOR MY BLOOD!

Nightbrace
01-26-2007, 11:41 PM
I'd go with the outlaw, a lesser known company, but for the money, hard to beat.

Ian Mackenzie
01-27-2007, 03:50 AM
Greetings
It is time to upgrade my HT preamp, and I would be interested in some opinions regarding my options. I currently have a Sherwood Newcastle AVP-9080R AV Tuner/PreAmp. The sound quality for the HT settings are great, but the 2 channel sound is fairly lame (actually, it sucks). I have the choice of running older Adcom or McIntosh amps (have both options). I am also looking into both Rotel and Parasound as other purchasable options. For speakers, I have L100t3's for the front, and L60t’s for center and rear.

I am looking at the following options: (all under $1000)
Parasound AVC 2500 (used)
Rotel RSP 1066 (used)
B&K Reference 30 (used)
Adcom 860 II (demo)
Outlaw 970 (new)

I am open to all opinions, esp from actual users of the above equipment.
Thank you in advance,
Kevin.


Kevin

What are you using for 2 channel source? Your dvd player or a dedicated cd player or phono? The issue may or may not be the tuner preamp. I assume you are using a seperate power amp.

At any rate you might look at the latest crop of Harman stuff. Also the Vincent audio range has some nice models. Both tend to offer the real deal where it counts. Have a look at the Acram and Cambridge audio stuff also.

The signal routing the others mention its logical but not always the most convenient and probably not justified unless you are planning a major make over.

Ironically, my situation is the other way around.

I have no particular expectations for HT but two channel is where the real business is.

MJC
01-27-2007, 07:59 AM
I have the exact same Sherwood AVP-9080 processor. Did you know that you can enable six channel direct mode for playing regular CDs? I just put CDs in the dvd player and they play in stereo. I'm happy with the two channel sound of my processor, I can't actually tell any difference between six channel direct with the DVD input and the regular stereo input for the CD player, but it's nice to have the bypass anyway.
That is the easiest solution, using the bypass input sends the signal straight to the amp. No DSP processing at all. Just need a good DVD player for cds.
It certainly works for DVD-A/SACD, pure analog sent to the amp. Of coarse the cds will never sound as good as dvd-a or sacd.

I like listening to vinyl, I use a stereo receiver and old turntable in a different room, couldn't be bothered getting a phono preamp to connect to the H/K AVR.

Shane Shuster
01-28-2007, 02:57 PM
I have a question about direct bypass modes, on most of the receivers and digital preamps I've seen the volume is controlled digitally, so how can it be a "direct" bypass mode if you are using a analog source? Aren't most of them just calling tone controls set to flat and no extra processing a bypass mode even though there is some processing?

For a true bypass wouldn't you need a totally separate preamp. I would think you would.

Mr. Widget
01-28-2007, 03:42 PM
For a true bypass wouldn't you need a totally separate preamp. I would think you would.That is essentially what the very best units do... and is part of the reason that they cost so much. Use my technique with a second dedicated pre-... it is far less costly and you can pick and choose the flavor of your pre.


Widget

Shane Shuster
01-28-2007, 04:22 PM
That is essentially what the very best units do... and is part of the reason that they cost so much. Use my technique with a second dedicated pre-... it is far less costly and you can pick and choose the flavor of your pre.
Widget


I nearly bought a used Bryston HT preamp that was like that. I held off because I never have had any luck with a home theater processor/ preamp sounding better than a $1000-ish Onkyo or Denon (which are usually easier to use). Maybe because they use the same chip sets and go through standardized decoding/processing they sound roughly the same?

A Meridian with its customization or a Bryston with its separate analog section and no video section might make a difference but I've never owned them.

MJC
01-28-2007, 05:07 PM
I never have had any luck with a home theater processor/ preamp sounding better than a $1000-ish Onkyo or Denon (which are usually easier to use). Maybe because they use the same chip sets and go through standardized decoding/processing they sound roughly the same?
I'm using an inexpensive Denon receiver for my turntable system. Lately I've been looking for a better intergrated amp or separates. The Denon PMA-2000 IVR @ $1200 seems like it might be a good choice. It has a phono equalizer that gets its own shielded, dedicated power supply.
I was thinking of B&K stereo separates, but the preamp needs an additional phono preamp, whereas their older preamps had phono inputs.

Mr. Widget
01-28-2007, 06:23 PM
Lately I've been looking for a better intergrated amp or separates. The Denon PMA-2000 IVR @ $1200 seems like it might be a good choice....If the Denon PMA... is a digital surround receiver or even a surround processor, I agree with Shane. The good ones and the moderately inexpensive units ~$1000 all sound about the same. Even if they offer a phono stage card as an option or it's included, these contemporary digital front ends are fine for movies, but they can't compete with even the fairly mediocre low end separates and mid-fi receivers of the past.

I really doubt your investment of $1200 would make much of a difference. It might have a lower noise floor and easier to use interface, but I would be shocked if it sounded any better than what you already have.


Widget

MJC
01-28-2007, 07:00 PM
If the Denon PMA... is a digital surround receiver or even a surround processor, I agree with Shane. The good ones and the moderately inexpensive units ~$1000 all sound about the same. Even if they offer a phono stage card as an option or it's included, these contemporary digital front ends are fine for movies, but they can't compete with even the fairly mediocre low end separates and mid-fi receivers of the past.

I really doubt your investment of $1200 would make much of a difference. It might have a lower noise floor and easier to use interface, but I would be shocked if it sounded any better than what you already have.


Widget
From what I've read the PMA is all analog, the specs show no DACs. My current Denon stereo receiver, in price comparision only, was $299, if I remember right.
http://usa.denon.com/ProductDetails/553.asp

hjames
01-28-2007, 07:46 PM
So - should assume that high-tech Harmon Kardon AVR 7300 isn't considered real high fidelity? I think MSR is around $2400 ...

Sounds like it has all kinds of presets that auto-switch modes as you change sources - 'course I doubt it has a vinyl input ... sigh ...

Its default is 7.1 but from the manual it appears you can run it 5.1 - which is all I usually do for DVD and TV use. My current system auto-selects 2 channel mode for CD and vinyl.

Anyone have any hands on experience with that?
Anyone here own one?http://www.myharman.net/images/products/AVR7300.jpg

jim campbell
01-28-2007, 08:07 PM
back in the vhs days i used to play movies thru my l300's in stereo full range and i still have not heard an h/t setup that dynamic until mega dollars are invested.i wonder about the wisdom of 5 or 7 ok speakers as opposed to 2 really good ones.the same argument could apply to the electronica as well

MJC
01-28-2007, 09:04 PM
back in the vhs days i used to play movies thru my l300's in stereo full range and i still have not heard an h/t setup that dynamic until mega dollars are invested.i wonder about the wisdom of 5 or 7 ok speakers as opposed to 2 really good ones.the same argument could apply to the electronica as well
All parts being equal, of coarse you have to spend a large amount.
Two speakers @ $X to seven speakers @ $7X. If you're going from two speakers @ $X to seven speakers @ $3X or less, you get what you pay for.
Case in point. In '79 the L212 system for $2000 / list for two channels.
At this point in time the PT800s are $1700/ea, list = 7 PT800 better than 2 L212s. If you're only spending $1500 for 7 speakers the 2 channel L212 is better.
As much as I like vinyl, listening to DVD-A or SACD thru 5 identical, quality speakers is something else.
And you still have to spend a fair amount of cash to get good quality Stereo.
As far as the AVR 7300, its still an AVR not an analog amp.

Mr. Widget
01-28-2007, 09:12 PM
So - should assume that high-tech Harmon Kardon AVR 7300 isn't considered real high fidelity?
I wouldn't consider it high fidelity... but must admit, I have never heard one... I have heard quite a few multi-thousand dollar AVRs... they tend to have more useless bells and whistles and larger bad amp sections than their less expensive counterparts. I would go with a less expensive AVR and use the pre-outs to feed decent amps.


Widget

Mr. Widget
01-28-2007, 09:18 PM
From what I've read the PMA is all analog...I'd think better sounding electronics were likely available in the used market, but this Denon may be a good performer. My impression of the Denon gear I've auditioned is that it is well built and designed using solid thinking, but they aren't typically sonic standouts.


Widget

MJC
01-28-2007, 10:08 PM
I wouldn't consider it high fidelity... but must admit, I have never heard one... I have heard quite a few multi-thousand dollar AVRs... they tend to have more useless bells and whistles and larger bad amp sections than their less expensive counterparts. I would go with a less expensive AVR and use the pre-outs to feed decent amps.
Widget
That's what I'm doing in my HT. But the other side of the coin is, how good is the pre-amp, compared to a real pre/pro. I keep asking myself, how much better would my HT be if I were to use a Lexicon pre/pro instead of my H/K AVR 635? At a jump of multiple $$$.
With my stereo setup it sounds fairly good, but not a lot of depth in the soundstage. Thus the thought of getting a better amp.

Shane Shuster
01-28-2007, 10:38 PM
That's what I'm doing in my HT. But the other side of the coin is, how good is the pre-amp, compared to a real pre/pro. I keep asking myself, how much better would my HT be if I were to use a Lexicon pre/pro instead of my H/K AVR 635? At a jump of multiple $$$.
With my stereo setup it sounds fairly good, but not a lot of depth in the soundstage. Thus the thought of getting a better amp.

I run a receiver to separate amps. I also asked that question and came to the conclusion that most of the preamp processors sound the same as a receiver. They really shouldn't, but they do. I've never tried the over $10,000 ones, maybe they are different.

With how fast technology moves it seems they would be missing decoding formats in a few years time anyway. Most are upgradeable, but thats a
trip to the factory and a couple more grand to update the cards. It might be easier to just buy a mid-range receiver every few years.

MJC
01-29-2007, 07:44 AM
I'd think better sounding electronics were likely available in the used market, but this Denon may be a good performer. My impression of the Denon gear I've auditioned is that it is well built and designed using solid thinking, but they aren't typically sonic standouts.


Widget
Ya, come to think of it, a used McIntosh intergrated amp should work well with my CC L212s.

Mr. Widget
01-29-2007, 08:02 AM
I was thinking more along the lines of Audio Research, Conrad Johnson, Threshold etc., but a Mac integrated may not be a bad choice... though they tend to remain pricey and you would have to get the right one... I have heard some real stinkers from them.


Widget

MJC
01-29-2007, 09:21 AM
I haven't listened to McIntosh or Mark Levinson amps since I moved up here, from LV, 21 years ago. There was a shop down there, The Upper Ear, that sold both. I read a year or two ago they closed up, they didn't want to get into multi-channel and lost their customer base.
I don't think I've ever heard Conrad Johnson, or Threshold.

loach71
01-29-2007, 06:20 PM
Try to snag a used Sony TAE 9000ES home theater control center. It is only a 5.1 device, (good enough for me) but the sonic quality is quite good. They are available for about $250 - $300 on EbaY. Sony still provides service on this model too.

Mr. Widget
01-29-2007, 06:48 PM
I don't think I've ever heard Conrad Johnson, or Threshold.Threshold has been out of business for quite a few years now, but they made some very good gear and it was seriously over-built so most of it should still be up to spec. Conrad Johnson is still with us... they have and do make some wonderful gear, especially their tube stuff. Gear from GAS and Sumo are also quite good, and there is just a ton of other amazingly great '80s vintage high quality two-channel gear that is regularly available for very little cash... most of it is dumped because of the lack of a remote. Remotes are damned convenient, but most gear that sports one sounds pretty mediocre.
It is only a 5.1 device, but the sonic quality is quite good.TiDome disagrees with me, but I think that 7.1 was created more to sell new gear than to solve any real sonic issues. I run 5.1 in both of my surround systems and they are both quite capable of total aural immersion.


Widget

Titanium Dome
01-29-2007, 07:13 PM
;)

7.1 will set you free.

hjames
01-29-2007, 07:17 PM
;)

7.1 will set you free.


7.1 will save the AV dealers of America ... :bouncy:

Mr. Widget
01-29-2007, 09:13 PM
;)

7.1 will set you free.Some people need Viagra, others need 7.1... oh, sorry, wrong thread. :rotfl:


Widget

Titanium Dome
01-29-2007, 09:34 PM
Some people need Viagra, others need 7.1... oh, sorry, wrong thread. :rotfl:


Widget

Bill Miller: "Why can't it be both?"

MJC
01-30-2007, 04:45 PM
Try to snag a used Sony TAE 9000ES home theater control center. It is only a 5.1 device, (good enough for me) but the sonic quality is quite good. They are available for about $250 - $300 on EbaY. Sony still provides service on this model too.
No Sonys for me. I had a Sony 'top of the line unit' and had it in the shop 3 times in 8 years.

MJC
01-30-2007, 04:51 PM
TiDome disagrees with me, but I think that 7.1 was created more to sell new gear than to solve any real sonic issues. I run 5.1 in both of my surround systems and they are both quite capable of total aural immersion.
Widget
Companies, like Lexicon, created 7.1 channels from stereo long before DD5.1 receivers and pre/pros became the norm. That thought process is something like, and I don't remember exactly, human hearing expects to hear sounds from behind.

hjames
01-30-2007, 06:11 PM
Companies, like Lexicon, created 7.1 channels from stereo long before DD5.1 receivers and pre/pros became the norm. That thought process is something like, and I don't remember exactly, human hearing expects to hear sounds from behind.

Sure - but most folks run their 5.1 like I run mine - they way most well setup 5.1 systems are arranged - 2 behind me
2 in the front - center over (or under) the monitor, and the subwoofer (the dot one).

7.1 is the same pattern, the center, fronts, rears, and Sub, plus the addition
of 2 speakers to your sides ...

The rears have always been part of the equation for surround sound - even in the "bad" old days of Quad ...

MJC
01-30-2007, 06:47 PM
When I only had 5 channels, the surrounds were on the sides, @ about 110*.

pasadena
01-31-2007, 06:42 AM
I'm currently on the path to creating a 2CH setup as well as a HT setup and am trying to find ways/best possible solutions/compromises to integrate the both.

I love my music and I love watching movies but I'd also like to have my audio in HT to rival that of 2CH. That's where the problem lies, finding a common ground to have the best of both worlds.

The problem with most HT receivers, even the ones that cost upward to $10k, have pre-outs that totally suck. Manufacturer's seems to ignore the pre-out section but you can understand why they haven't done so as the everyday user would never bother with it, let alone understanding it. The average joe blo just wants to come home, turn on the system and watch a movie.

Those of us who demand more audio performance have to look at seperates but even then they suffer the same fate as HT receivers with pre-outs that are terrible and change the make-up of the sound.

I haven't had the pleasure of listening to a Lexicon 12B, as no one around here sells them but G.T reckons they're excellent and I have read a lot of reviews saying that audio performance is some of the best heard from a HT pre-pro. BUT, all this comes at a cost that most of us probably cannot afford or may never afford, unless you weight 10 years when the product is obselet and goping cheap, then you have yourself a bargain.

I figured that equipment that was outrageously expensive in it's time tends to become very affordable approaching the 10 year mark. That's my thought.

In the 2CH world, you can use a pre-amp of your choice and if you're fortunate to maybe have a HT bypass you can feed the signal from your HT source into your favourite power amps. One must realise that even with the best pre-amps and power amps money could buy, yourt HT signal is as good as it's source and this takes us back to the pre-out section.

It's hard to avoid being carried away with all the HT hoopla these days and when you have kids, they too want to be entertained as if they were in a real cinema. Who's under pressure to meet their demands. ;) Come on, who wouldn't do anything for their kids.......to an extent. :) My wife and I love watching movies and why not have a great HT to match.

I suppose it comes down to what you want out of your system and how much you're willing to part with your money. Careful hunting and sensible decisions can yield and excellent system. Don't be pressured into thinking yourself into the notion that vasts amount of money buys the best system. Don't get sucked into the "Keep up with the Jones'" syndrome as this can be a very expensive exercise, who are you trying to impress!!!

It seems pointless to go down the the path of spending so much money on HT receivers and HT Pre-pro's when they are in fact the limiting factor. They are the weak link in the system so therefore the only way out is to compromise. Hardly the best solution that offers limited opportunities.

If you're after a HT receiver but have you own power amps you wish to use, I'd suggest you take your amps to hi-shops for an audition. The same goes for buying a pre-pro. Mind you, I don't know how many shops out there who will hookup HT receivers to your power amps and dick around with all the connections to get you up and running. This is a good test to see how much the shop will bend over backwards to go with your setup.

You can buy components from $500 - $1500 that will give you what you're looking for. A lot of people however do buy the lower end Denon Receivers not for their suckful music reproduction but for their very good HT processing capability. Buy yourself a good pre-amp and as a compromise you have a very good system.

Another example is that you get people who buy a Lexicon MC-1 for it's excellent HT processing capabilities mated with their 2ch pre-amp of their choice.

You also find that there's a stupendous amount of people that buy into Rotel's RSP range such as the 1068 and their top line 1098. Interestingly you find B&W owners with speakers costing squillions of dollars go out an buy the Rotel pre-pros. Either they've run out of money and can't buy the best pre-pro's or they find the Rotel's as a compromise that delivers the sound they want. The Rotel, especially the 1098 is excellent from all accounts and is a well priced item in the market, hence its vast attraction. Now that it's been superseeded, there could be a bargain to be had.

There are always means and ways of achieving a result.

Based on equipment listed in the first post, I would have thought the Outlaw came first then maybe the Rotel/Parasound. I have a Denon 2800 that, for the moment, fullfills my needs for HT. The pre-outs on this suck totally. I liken the sound as being feed through a sock, veiled and compressed.

If anyone's interested in an interesting piece of equipment that will integrate HT and 2ch very well, take a look at Son'y TA-P9000ES 5.1 analogue pre-amplifier. You'll be surprised at what this sucker can do for you.

Food for thought. :banghead:

Cheers
Pasadena.

MJC
01-31-2007, 01:52 PM
I'm going the route of having a separate stereo system in a different room from the HT. I just have to figure out what stereo amp will work best with my Charged-Coupled L212s. But for now I use a cheapy Denon stereo receiver.

pasadena
01-31-2007, 07:29 PM
If I had the luxury of a second room I would do the same but I think even in my next house, HT and 2CH will reside in the same room so the setup will be a trickier proposition.

I've had my Denon 2800 receiver for some 7 or 8 years now and it still does the job for me. I've heard the latest Denon 4306, not sure what model in the U.S it relates to but it's supposed to be excellent for HT but not good musically, maybe fatiguing.

I think that if someone's going to go for something like the 4306, you're better off going to pickup a secondhand Rotel RSP-1098 pre-pro, which should keep one very happy.

Because the market is rapidly changing and currently in a transition phase with all the new technology coming through, you're better off waiting until second generation gear comes out (next year) or pickup something amongst the treasure trove of secondhand gear floating around the place.

Cheers
Pasadena.

coherent_guy
01-31-2007, 09:49 PM
Here's some info on the Parasound 2500 AVC which I own. It is a well built unit, made in Finland if you can believe that! The surround processing is done by software on two Motorola processors. It does not have many surround modes at all, if you like all the manufactuer defined non-Dolby or DTS types don't get this unit. There was an update to the early models that adds bass management, ask the seller if it has this already installed. One oddity is while it has a five channel pass-through input for say 5.1 SACDs, the input needs an add-on volume control card sold by Parasound. That option then bypasses the digitization of most if not all inputs. The preamp stages are all discrete components, and is a 5.1 unit, not 7.1, etc. It does have some THX processing. There is an onboard tuner with presets, AM/FM. It has dual subwoofer outputs so you could call it a 5.2 unit perhaps? I think it sounds pretty good but I use it only in a HT system with SVA1600's, SVA Center, and subwoofer.

pasadena
02-01-2007, 03:36 AM
I used to own a Yamaha receiver and there's so many DSP modes for DTS and Dolby that I never used them, in fact I didn't like any of them and just played it in theatre mode only and that was it.

With my Denon, you either have a choice of Direct, Dolby or DTS. I don't think there's a need for these 50 odd modes you can get with the latest Yamaha's.

I plug in a movie and the receiver picks the signal type, auto sets and off you go.

Simple is the best.

Is there anyone here that has a Yamaha or a receiver with a multitude of DSP modes and do you use any of them?

Cheers
Pasadena.

hjames
02-01-2007, 05:48 AM
My JVC receiver has a number of DSP modes (Digital Signal Processing) - I can set the apparent room size from small space to cabaret to concert hall etc. I flipped through it once or twice but never use any of those.
Honestly, it kinda sounds like reverb - a nice effect when you are playing guitar, but not so fine for music listening.

But - the JVC does let me choose between analog inputs or optical for many sound sources - and offers Dolby Digital as well as DTS sound mode when I watch HDTV or DVDs - many DVDs offer both Dolby Digital 5.1 or DTS 5.1 sound and I usually find the DTS sounds better. Even has a phono input!

But its a 4-5 year old unit - I don't think they have anything comparable today ...



I used to own a Yamaha receiver and there's so many DSP modes for DTS and Dolby that I never used them, in fact I didn't like any of them and just played it in theatre mode only and that was it.

With my Denon, you either have a choice of Direct, Dolby or DTS. I don't think there's a need for these 50 odd modes you can get with the latest Yamaha's.

I plug in a movie and the receiver picks the signal type, auto sets and off you go.

Simple is the best.

Is there anyone here that has a Yamaha or a receiver with a multitude of DSP modes and do you use any of them?

Cheers
Pasadena.

MJC
02-01-2007, 05:28 PM
Here's some info on the Parasound 2500 AVC which I own. It is a well built unit, made in Finland if you can believe that! .
Parasound is some pretty good gear. I've got the Parasound 2205A THX amp. I use a H/K AVR 635 receiver for the pre/pro, I really like the logic 7 surround sound. Anytime I'm watching a movie on sat or cable, I use the L7 instead of DD.
I think I'm going to try a H/K Citation pre-amp for my stereo L212 setup. There is a number of them on ebay right now. And at first I'll connect my old Yamaha intergrated amp, which only good as a power amp now. If I still don't think the soundstage is right I'll get a different amp, maybe a Citation.

Mr. Widget
02-01-2007, 09:27 PM
Parasound is some pretty good gear. I agree... the several pieces of Parasound gear I have heard have all sounded quite good.


Widget

Titanium Dome
02-01-2007, 09:30 PM
The Citation 7.0 is renowned for its stereo analog bypass. It has Dolby ProLogic 70MM, but none of the more recent modes. The Citation 5.0 is newer with the great stereo analog bypass, plus DD 5.1 and DTS 5.1 (if installed as an option), plus other modes.

I still have a 5.0 in my pre/pro arsenal, though it's #3 behind the FAP T1 and FAP T1+.

The Citations are a bitch to set up, but with some commitment they are still first class units.

eyedoc
02-02-2007, 04:37 PM
Wow, I do not log on for a while, and get more helpful responses than I expected! Sorry to be rude and not post back, but I ended up needing to go to meetings in Las Vegas, and did not have internet access.

To answer earlier questions, as far as source material, currently have the option of DVD or (sorry in advance) Sony PS1. And yes, I am using separate amps. I also listen to my local public radio station (music mainly) and am looking into going the HD radio in the future, but that will be a separate post all together.

The option of a separate system is something I have been kicking around as well. I have a Russound speaker switcher (or whatever it is called) that actually has inputs for 2 separate sources along side of the 6 speaker outputs. I used to use both inputs in a previous house where input one was essentially speaker ĎBí to give stereo front and back, and the other for the rear channel when watching movies (back when I was using an old Pioneer receiver). I was hoping to get away from additional pieces, but do I understand that this may be the best (and affordable) option?

With that in mind, Widget mentioned the concept of pre-amps for under $500. Any recommendations? I know that the Adcom 750 has been given great reviews, any history with the GFP 715? Unfortunately, I am lazy enough to need a remote (to control from the kitchen), so old tube stuff will not be practical.

As always, I greatly appreciate the help.

MJC
02-03-2007, 11:11 AM
For my stereo setup I might be getting a Citation 17 pre-amp and I might bid on a Hafler XL-280 power amp or a Citation 19.