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eyedoc
10-29-2006, 10:49 AM
Greetings all.

I will probably get flamed here, but try to bare with my question. I have several pieces from the T3 line (2 pair 100's, 3 pair 20's) and I actually love (be nice now...) the wood veneer. I know it has consistently be described as “crappy” but out of all of the pieces, none have a single bubble or crack or flaw (I do have one of my four L60t cabs with bubbling but I picked up that pair for $60, so I cannot complain there).

My question regards the type of wood and stain color. I am about to begin a project of an entertainment center based on the Salamander Synergy concept, and I would potentially like to match the wood (or at least be in the same color family). It looks a lot like the Italian Rosewood one the Oakwood website, http://www.oakwoodveneer.com/samples/samples6.html , but I can’t imagine JBL spending that much on a consumer line. Other thoughts is that it is maybe ash, or walnut like the predecessors L*T line, but the grain seems to be completely different.

Thanks in advance, and any help would be greatly appreciated.

Kevin.

alexkerhead
10-29-2006, 12:46 PM
Those cabs wont stain right.
You will need to remove the old veneer and apply new veneer(easy).

Get something similar to this.
http://www.partsexpress.com/pe/showdetl.cfm?&DID=7&Partnumber=260-048

And stain it the color you want.


Good day!

Alex

eyedoc
10-29-2006, 12:57 PM
Actually, I am wanting to make the new project match the present speakers. I like to T3 dark red color.

alexkerhead
10-29-2006, 01:40 PM
Actually, I am wanting to make the new project match the present speakers. I like to T3 dark red color.
Oh, ok, then you might want to look for a rack that matches closely, but can be stained the same color.

Mr. Widget
10-29-2006, 02:46 PM
Call Oakwood and ask for samples... they will mail you a couple of approximately 5" squares that you can experiment on a portion of.

BTW: I have a sample of their "Italian Rosewood"... it is a manufactured product that I thought looked a little hoaky.


Widget

alexkerhead
10-29-2006, 09:19 PM
Eyedoc,

I have been informed in another thread that the advice I provided is completely wrong and should not be taken into consideration.

I apologize for any misadvice I provided.
Although I cannot see a problem with any of it.

You could also get a unfinished entertainment center and stain it the color you like.

Thom
10-30-2006, 11:35 AM
If you're talking about L100's it was called walnut. I have no idea if that was helpful but it seemed at least harmless.

eyedoc
10-30-2006, 02:40 PM
Alex,

Thanks for your help, but yes your recommendations are different from my intention. I am planning on designing and building a unit from scratch (or wood of course), and am looking for the actual wood and stain recipe (or color) to match the speakers (L100t3 series) in their present color.

alexkerhead
10-30-2006, 03:01 PM
Ah, I see.
you might goto lowes or wherever you can find a wide variety of stain and see what they have.
Minwax is my favorite, especially the oil variety.
The provincial 211 and special walnut seem like a good color matches.
Here are the color choices.
http://www.minwax.com/products/woodstain/woodfinish-color.cfm

Here is the type of stain I use.
http://www.minwax.com/products/woodstain/woodfinish.cfm

Phil H
10-31-2006, 03:34 PM
I don't think this is much help. But the T3 brochure in the library says that they were oak or walnut veneer.
http://www.lansingheritage.org/html/jbl/specs/home-speakers/1988-l-series.htm

hmolwitz
11-09-2006, 06:31 PM
Go to Sherwin Williams with a sample of your wood and your speaker and have them match the color.
I have had excellent luck with that.
Their stain is good and the match is free, though the quality of the match depends on the skill of the worker.
Harry

Don Mascali
11-10-2006, 02:16 AM
On one of my old projects I wanted a reddish oak color. I took MinWax Golden Oak stain and added Oxblood paste shoe polish and kept trying spots on a scrap piece of wood until It looked right.
I would bet if you used medium walnut stain on walnut veneer and experimented with additives you could get it right.

You can use anything that disolves in the mineral spirits base of the stain to color it.

loach71
11-10-2006, 08:23 AM
I am attempting the same Rosewood-like color for my girfriend's home theater system. I am using Varathane brand stain, color name is CABERNET. It seems to do the trick.

cvengr
11-10-2006, 08:39 AM
www.woodworkerssource.net provided some nice reference material.

IMHO, hardwoods vary greatly in grain, color, tint, and general appearance from one lot to the next. This is obvious i that they come from different trees which have grown sometimes in vastly different areas.

Cabinet makers will spend quite a bit of time and material wastage trying to match grains, and complement one another when matching adjacent pieces.

Some finely grained hardwoods such as mahogany are more easily matched than say oak.

The color of the finished product will depend on the grain, dryness, original color, depth of penetration of the stain, depth of penetration of sealing layer, type of sealant (tung oil vs polyurethane vs varnish). Matching the color, tint, and hue is probably easier with a paint, as it is the finish color. The stain's finish color will be influenced by both substrate and sealing properties.

Another approach is simply to try an duplicate the same material and processes on all pieces.

Least expensive might be a long run of veneer bookmatched so that as you finish one speaker cabinet, enough remaining veneer cut from the same log may be applied to the next cabinet. Then process all in nearly similar methods. For example, applying your stain in one long strech down the length of the cabinet, then applying the next adjacent so tha overlapping stains have the same density of stain applied to the surface.

The Oct 2004 issue of Wood Magazine has a couple of good articles on staining and finishing that better explain the process.

Grit of sandpaper used will vastly change the color tone between different pieces.

Big differences between dye and stain, as well as how some woods with lighter natural color may absorb more stain than adjacent drk areas resulting in a finished piece with inverted colors, i.e. light wood is now the darker wood color.

http://miniwax.com/shoptalk/resources/basics.cfm

cvengr
11-10-2006, 08:45 AM
On a different note, does anybody have a federal color number or different paint manufacturuer color number for the JBL Monitor baffle blue. Tint, shade, hue, additives or crinkle finish as appropriate is also appreciated.

Also does anybody know how the original baffles on JBL Blue monitors were prefinished? Sealed or primed? how many coats, how much penetration? Thanks in advance.

These colors are are notorious for being matched over the Internet. The original picture, .jpg, monitor, brightness and contrast all vary considerably for Internet photos to mean much. When matching colors in paint, even with the same base paint, hue, tint, tone, and shade may gratly effect the final match.

Earl K
11-10-2006, 09:20 AM
On a different note, does anybody have a federal color number or different paint manufacturuer color number for the JBL Monitor baffle blue. Tint, shade, hue, additives or crinkle finish as appropriate is also appreciated.


JBL Blue REDUX (http://audioheritage.csdco.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=1910&highlight=JBL+Blue)

- You can start by reading the thread that I've provided a link to .
- It doesn't offer a definative answer / though it appears to offer some good guidelines .

:)

cvengr
11-10-2006, 10:03 AM
Thanks

Mr. Widget
11-10-2006, 10:48 AM
On a different note, does anybody have a federal color number or different paint manufacturuer color number for the JBL Monitor baffle blue. Tint, shade, hue, additives or crinkle finish as appropriate is also appreciated.Here is a discussion about the texture:

http://audioheritage.org/vbulletin/showthread.php?p=132059


Widget