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Robh3606
10-22-2006, 12:09 PM
I have a bunch of 78's and LP's that were my fathers many in good shape. I am going to have to start going thru them to see what I want to keep. I just don't have the space and more importanatly I doubt I will ever listen to many of them. I don't want to just toss them. Any ideas????

Rob:)

Zilch
10-22-2006, 12:43 PM
There's a local club around here that meet at least once a month in a record store parking lot to swap 78's outta the trunks of their cars.

If you don't have one, start one, maybe.... :D

soundboy
10-22-2006, 01:34 PM
I had the same thing happen to me years ago...and I gave away/tossed them. I sorely regret it now that I have a decent turntable again:banghead:. I had converted to CD by then, and just wasn't taken with them. I recently disovered...even with ticks, pops, and bass rolled off masters, you can really get lost in the music....and the albums I have the CD to compare....simply don't compare....the LP's sound closer to the artist through the midrange and vocals....sorry to go on, but at least keep the nicer ones....in respect for dad, for one thing...and the music, for another....ten years from now you may thank me...times and storage considerations change....Pete

morbo!
10-22-2006, 04:18 PM
I have a bunch of 78's and LP's that were my fathers many in good shape. I am going to have to start going thru them to see what I want to keep. I just don't have the space and more importanatly I doubt I will ever listen to many of them. I don't want to just toss them. Any ideas????

Rob:)

Ebay
Old records can bring a great price depending on what they are and condition
I think a mint war of the worlds album is worth 600$ au atm
And it gonna go to some1 who will appreaciate it

if u want a copy digitise it 1st!

jim campbell
10-22-2006, 06:20 PM
there is a guy over here with a housefull of 78's and has assumed a kind of archive role for all that old stuff.i heard he will tape requests for you if you ask.i wonder if any of our snowbound members have heard of him.i think he is into the swing big band era stuff mostly but i dont know for sure.might be worth a look

Wornears
10-22-2006, 07:35 PM
There are record collectors on this forum like me. Make a list of the specifics and I'll be you get some offers.

Fred Sanford
10-23-2006, 03:40 AM
All of my 78s are at my friend's shop, if anyone's looking for some give him a shout to see what he still has:

www.sgcustomsound.com (http://www.sgcustomsound.com)

Scott's a great guy, tell him John Evans sent you.

je

Rolf
10-24-2006, 12:46 AM
In 1982/83 in my hurry to get new technology, buying a cd player I made a deal with a local record shop. He bought all of my lp's for about US$ 6000, and I could pick up cd's over time, as what I wanted become available. I also sold my HK record player with a Rabco arm and Signet pic-up.

Today I regret it. Keep all of your records. They are a legacy of their time.

I wish I had.

Hoerninger
10-24-2006, 01:54 AM
Presumably you have sifted that bunch of disks. But may be you take a fancy to a new style of music. ;) So don't give them away too quickly.

I have invested in new record player gear and it is amazing how good old LPs are sounding. I've got a needle for 78 as well, as I know these old records are sometimes real treasures: By advice of a colleague I've got an intererest in swing and some jazz, these records aren't the latest ones.

Music I listen to very often I put on CD. I do only give away those disks I do not like, space is not an issue so far.
____________
Peter

Hoerninger
10-24-2006, 02:24 AM
...
I think a mint war of the worlds album is worth 600$ au atm
And it gonna go to some1 who will appreaciate it If you are not so much interested in the album but in listening to the show, you can find it here:
http://hobbes.nmsu.edu/cgi-bin/h-viewer?sh=1&fname=/pub/multimedia/wave/mpeg/warworld.mp3
It is a 24 kbps MP3 and better audible than this 16Kbps MP3:
http://www.archive.org/details/WAROFTHEWORLDS2

Nice to listen to!
__________
Peter

Ducatista47
10-24-2006, 09:21 PM
I don't have a way to play my late parent's old 78's right now, but I sure don't want to get rid of them. One of my best listening experiences was hearing Caruso on an Edison cylinder grammaphone in a basement years ago. The sound coming out of the horn was haunting and powerfull. It indeed seemed like a voice coming through a tunnel connected to the past. I remember 78's having similar qualities. Perhaps many members would get the same feeling listening to 45's in a Rockola jukebox.

LP's have sonic qualities that make it a possibly foolish act to get rid of good examples. Most lp's still sound better than most cd's when played through decent equipment. The older formats may not have the accuracy edge of lp's and cd's, but, as mentioned above, there are other rewards.

If worse comes to worse, your local high end audio shop might have patrons interested in giving some of your vinyl and shellac a good home.

Clark in Peoria

Rolf
10-25-2006, 01:28 AM
... Most lp's still sound better than most cd's when played through decent equipment.
Clark in Peoria

Most cd's sound better than lp's when played through decent equipment.;)

Steve Schell
10-25-2006, 03:16 PM
I just returned from the Rocky Mountain Audio Fest in Denver. Turntables were spinning all over the show as always, and most of the best sound came from them. I was able to attend a couple of late night listening sessions with friends, and some of the LP playback was just tremendous. It is somewhat true of digital sound but very apparent with LPs that there are new layers of resolution and listener involvement to be found in the old recordings or their reissues as the equipment improves. At times Ella or Billie seemed to be singing in front of us with a believability that I've never experienced with CDs or SACDs.

I am certain that the beer played no part in this whatsoever.

grumpy
10-25-2006, 06:38 PM
If the music is worthwhile, the recording is done well and properly
mastered/transferred I can enjoy just about any format. Sometimes the music
manages to come through anyway :) My records are here to stay as well as
my CDs... sheesh, I have cassettes that I still like to listen to (although
I'm down to a player in my car and a dead Aiwa in the garage) :D

The caliber of digital gear I'd consider using for LP->file transfer is still a bit too dear for me. Maybe some day.

-grumpy

Ducatista47
10-25-2006, 09:11 PM
There is one song that I only have an mp3 of, Anything Goes by the Paul Whiteman Orchestra, about 1935. It's all I have so I enjoy the heck out of it. Often! It doesn't hurt that great gear makes the most of questionable sources, so we LH members can count ourselves lucky, maybe even a little bit smart, to be into these wonderful systems.

Fidelity aside, it is all about the music. I couldn't agree more, Grumpy.

Clark

Rolf
10-26-2006, 12:07 AM
Well, if the case is NOT hi fidelity, but old recordings there is no need to discuss what sounds best?:blink:

I thought hi-fi and the best possible sound was what we talked about, and for that you need the best recordings and the best equipment.

Sorry for my misunderstanding.

Ducatista47
10-26-2006, 12:18 AM
No misunderstanding, Rolf. I enjoy my little mp3, but I would rather have the recording master of the session!;) Better yet, if I could bring the band back from the dead I'd prefer them to play it for me right here.

I'm not going to stop listening to the local jazz station on my car radio because the 4345's are not in the car. Given the choice, anytime, I want to hear the best possible source on the best possible rig. But I won't play something I don't want to hear as much as something else just because the recording is better. It is the music that is the most important thing for me.

Clark

Rolf
10-26-2006, 12:28 AM
Sure! I do understand that. Me to listen to music on my radio in the car. I also listen to music on a cheap cd radio and to not so good sounding cd's at home.

What I was talking about is if you have a very high quality setup for analog (LP's), and a very high quality setup for digital, (CD's) with the best possible recordings on both systems.

I have yet to hear the analog setup sounding better. I must add that for 10 years ago the picture was not so clear.

That was my point.


No misunderstanding, Rolf. I enjoy my little mp3, but I would rather have the recording master of the session!;) Better yet, if I could bring the band back from the dead I'd prefer them to play it for me right here.

I'm not going to stop listening to the local jazz station on my car radio because the 4345's are not in the car. Given the choice, anytime, I want to hear the best possible source on the best possible rig. But I won't play something I don't want to hear as much as something else just because the recording is better. It is the music that is the most important thing for me.

Clark

louped garouv
10-26-2006, 04:46 PM
I play them.... :applaud:

jblnut
10-30-2006, 01:19 PM
Records are still my reference for how good my system can sound, and I'm far from alone on this. I'm helping a friend move several thousand albums into my basement over the next few days because he's losing his storage space. I can't wait ! This is the fruits of his labor over the past 20 years of yard sales and flea markets picking out the best of the best while everyone was tossing them for cheap - or just outright giving them away. I always kept my records and I'm *so* glad I did. They are truly timeless if well cared for.

Don't toss them - keep them !

jblnut

speakerdave
10-30-2006, 07:20 PM
Still have 'em. My only regret is I left my Duane Eddy albums at home when I went off to college, and I don't know what happened to them.

David

cvengr
11-06-2006, 05:46 PM
I use their mass to line my speaker cabinets by packing them in 2ft x 15"x 14" teak veneered boxes, stacked to pad the cabinets. FWIW, a friend passed me several hundred old 33s from the 50s, many had never been played more than a half dozen times and no warpage. Swing big band sound plays great from the phono through the JBL horns.

Charley Rummel
12-02-2006, 06:29 PM
Hi everyone:

I have thousands (no kidding) of records stored in two rooms in my basement. I have 33 rpm albums, 45's, 78's, special release versions of many items on 7", 10" and 12" vinyl not really marketed for consumers, and I have several 16" transcriptions (and a Gates 16" turntable among my four turntables) of radio broadcasts, commercials, special releases, etc., and the list goes on. I also have reel to reel tapes, cassettes, and a box of 8 tracks somewhere... Yes, I do have many CD's as well.

When the compact disk format first came to market, a number of my acquaintences rushed to have the latest technology. I witnessed over and over what were in my opinion wreckless migrations to this new technology. I saw people toss their entire album collections and spend ridiculous amounts of money on the CD versions (at least what they could find, anyway) of their old collections. And guess what? a lot of them were disappointed in the sound of their old favorites as they were released on CD - even the recordings that were promoted as remastered. Sure, there were (and are) a lot of cool things to be found on CD, but many people I knew were quietly dissapointed. The sound they were familiar with just wasn't their anymore.

As time went on and new releases gradually filled the CD racks at the record stores, the newer releases were mixed and mastered for this new media. Terrific sounding music. Also, the industry realized that re-releasing older material on CD would require a much more intense technical process if they are to be successful. I do have a number of recordings that were re-released onto CD - some with fantastic results and in some casses with additional material. And the opposite holds true.

I have Cream's 'Wheels Of Fire'; Iron Butterfly's 'In-A-God-A-Divita' (I think I spelled it right...); and a number of others on CD, that in my opinion sound like crap compared to the LP's, even after spending hours fiddling with the EQing and other parameters on my system. My son got a Black Saboth CD a couple years back, and we played it on my sound system. I then dug out my LP of the same (It was 'Iron Man') from way back when, and the difference in the sound quality was like night and day. The LP sounded sooooo much better than the CD.

I have mentioned on this forum in the past that I have mind f#@ked many so-called audio files who think they are on top of the world with their hi-end boutique gear when they hear my vacuum tube 5 channel monster playing vinyl through JBL/Altec speaker from the good old days. Gee what fun!

Kind regards,
Charley

Ducatista47
12-02-2006, 07:23 PM
I prefer vinyl myself, but there is some help available for old cd's. Rega has some new CD players that analyze the disc before playback and make adjustments to deal with the shortcomings of the cd.

My friends tell me it works pretty well. They can listen to their old cd's again without listener fatigue!

Clark in Peoria

LRBacon
12-06-2006, 12:11 PM
I sold most of my LPs and haven't listened to them for probably 10 years or more. Those LPs that I have left are either stored in a closet in the house or out in my garage. I have Sony PSX-6 turntable with a Shure V15 type IV cartridge that is stored in a box in the garage. What I like about CDs is the fact that there is no noise, except what was on the master tape that was used, if any. Granted I have purchased a few CDs that were master very poorly but overall the majority sound better than LPs in my opinion. Lp's wear out or get damage quite easily. When I was playing them I tried very hard to take care of them, but some how something would always happen to them. :banghead: I have also had a number of LPs converted to CD that weren't available on CD at the time. In the process, one company and an individual that I used, took out the majority of noise. There one fellow I had do a few, he was so good at cleaning up the noise, he even removed the tracking inner groove noise usually found in the last track of an LP side! Quite amazing work.
I don't miss using cassettes either. I very rarely played cassettes on the home system. I used cassettes strictly in the car. I can't stand wow and flutter, and with CD's there is none of that! When CD players in the car came along I was a very happy camper. :)

Larry, who is very fond of CDs

SUPERBEE
12-06-2006, 05:01 PM
PLAY EM!.... PLAY EM!.... PLAY EM! and I still COLLECT EM!.....COLLECT EM!.....COLLECT EM! I have thousands of LPs and thousands of 45s.

The turntable on my main system sounds way better than the CD player and I am an ex record store owner so of course I love them.

I always feel sorry for those guys that sold their records or dont play LPs anymore. Especially if you have a half decent sound system (like most here do) Thats like having a 4 speed HEMI Road Runner and never getting it out of second gear.

duaneage
12-12-2006, 06:42 AM
I have recorded many to MP3 format to make it easier to take them with me and burn CD's. I still have them all, they are not going anywhere. I got a shure V15 type 5 xmr right before they disappeared forever.

I don't think they are really that superior in terms of sound quaity but I'd rather just make a CD out of the album than replace it. It is neat to play them, a trip back in time.

Charley Rummel
12-15-2006, 06:55 PM
I like the analogy of your Hemi equipped Road Runner stuck in second gear!:applaud:

Regards,
Charley

MJC
12-31-2006, 11:26 AM
Most cd's sound better than lp's when played through decent equipment.;)
You must be joking.
LPs in good condition, no snap, crackle, pop, sound MUCH better than cds especially the early cds that only had a low sampling rate, 44k, I think. LPs are warmer, smoother.
Its the high sampling rate, for the most part, not totally, that makes DVD-A and SACD so much better than cd.
When DVD-A first came out, one of the old rockers, forget who, that was releasing his lps to DVD-A was asked why he didn't release on cds, his reply was. "CDs are so bad they should have never been sent to market."

duaneage
12-31-2006, 11:43 AM
I've compared some CDs and Albums today and I think a lot has to do with the particular album. Some records were not pressed well or mastered worth a darn. And if the record has a lot of mileage on it it's not going to sound better than a Cd anymore.

I attribute the "warmer" sound of records to a highend rolloff. Of course, those with 15,000.00 turntable and cartridge can disagree if they like.

MJC
12-31-2006, 12:03 PM
I'm using a $400, @'79 $, turntable and always had it connected to L212s, which they never had any problem getting to the upper end.
But you're right some recordings were better than others.
Now compared to DVD-A or SACD they(LP) sound a bit old school, but I still play them.

duaneage
12-31-2006, 08:51 PM
I think with great equipment you get as much as you can out of the record. If it's a bad master, like early beatles or led Zep, then your not going to get glorious performance anyway. In fact the cd brings out defects in a bad way and that's not an advantage either.

MJC
01-01-2007, 02:14 PM
In any audio setup the quality is defined by the weakest link. Maybe its the amp, the source gear, speakers or the source.
I've never heard sound from a $10k turntable, but I would think that somewhere between my $400 Yamaha turntable and one that cost $10k there is a point of little gain as far as $$ spent/output quality.
But I've never liked the sound from CDs, And I have had some LPs that the sound was garbled. Had other LPs, that had good sound, then one day they just seft destructed. Had to toss them out.

jim campbell
01-01-2007, 03:20 PM
ah yes the law of diminishing returns rears its ugly head.the difference between a $200 component and a $2000 unit is usually pretty big but the gap starts to narrow the higher you go.i wonder how much more performance improves between a $5000 mac 501 and some of those $30,000 monsters out there.the worst the cables that can sell for thousands.when you open up the amp the wire that goes to the output is usually nothing special and then somewhere in the line is a $2.00 fuse.a good moving coil cartridge with a pre pre does not have to cost $10k but $400 is a bit low.i suggest building from the source outward with the best components you can afford. as you can afford better components you add to a good basic framework instead of having to upgrade everything at once

MJC
01-01-2007, 03:43 PM
but $400 is a bit low

As I said a few posts back, that $400 was in '79 dollars. What's that today, maybe $2k? Besides, this past year I've been spending money on speakers, two sets, 7 total.

Dingusboy
04-04-2007, 03:20 AM
I have one of those $10K (well that's retail) vinyl playback systems. While I have no problem with folk saying CD's sound better, I can hear a real difference. My CDP is no slouch either. It sounds great as long as I haven't spun any vinyl within any close time proximity. There is an immediacy and involvement in hearing vinyl I just don't get with digital sources.

Turntable technology has come a LONG way since vinyl ruled and you don't need to spend that kinda of money to get most of the benefit.

KEEP the records. Maybe you get a vinyl rig, maybe you don't. But if you do, you'd hate to think you had all this vinyl available that is now gone.

jim campbell
04-04-2007, 08:18 AM
oh yeah keep the vinyl......cd's are a trade off between availability, longevity,and convenience to vinyls superior warmth and sound quality,tempered by the eventual deterioration of the source itself with the accompanying surface noise

Bernard Wolf
04-06-2007, 03:57 PM
When DVD-A first came out, one of the old rockers, forget who, that was releasing his lps to DVD-A was asked why he didn't release on cds, his reply was. "CDs are so bad they should have never been sent to market."

Neil Young

MJC
04-06-2007, 05:45 PM
Even tho I'm still using my old Yamaha turntable, upgrading from a Yamaha amp to Citation 11 pre-amp and Citation 19 amp has improved the sound to be a fuller soundstage, even surround like, on some lps.
But besides that, the L212s connected are also better than the originals. Mirror imaged, CC, and spikes added to the bases. So the source is the same, everything else, in the chain, is much better.

moldyoldy
04-07-2007, 07:49 AM
If "having the music move you" is a worthy goal to any, it doesn't necessarily have to be hifi. When my Mom died, I got the job of sorting what to keep of our parents' things, and wishy-washy'd over a 'short stack' of scratched 78s, mostly Big Band, until auction day, when I caved to my bro's "sell 'em". Big mistake. :( I now have much of the material on CD, but it does little for me, and I'd trade it all back in a heartbeat for those scratchy old copies of Duke's "Little Brown Jug" or "In the Mood", and the leatherette RCA "lifetime stylus" portable they played on.

(Just something to consider if you have children, before tossing your own "worthless" oldies).

RKLee
04-08-2007, 04:53 PM
Robh3606: I would try to keep you pops collection. You may find some of those recordings are rare and/or unsual.

As for me, most my collection of vinyl records is fairly recent as they contain only 12" 33 1/3 rpm LPs, 12" disco singles in 33 1/3 & 45 rpm, and 7" 45rpm singles from the mid-1960s to about the the late 1970s. But many of my vinyl records are half-speed mastered LPs; from Mobil Fidelity, CBS, Nautilus etc. Many of these are in the relm of semi to collectible status. I am going to digitize as many of these recordings as possible at the highest sampling rate possible to preserve the orginal nuances. The 12" disco singles in either 33 1/2 or 45 rpm sounds amazing good because the record company don't have to cram all of that info on single side and can use the entire side of vinyl by cutting a wide groove and spreading the space between grooves out, which results in deeper bass etc. I will be using a Mirco Seiki DDX1000 turntable with a Shure V15 type IV cartridge. Many of my vinyl records are treated with Ball Corp Sound Guard/Audio Technika Surface Treatment to prevent wear of the grooves where the stylus contacts the vinyl.

I think the pops, ticks, and clicks are part of the experince in listening to a vinyl record. Creative Labs, the company who makes add-on computer sound boards, has bundled software that can eliminate these surface anomolies in vinyl records.

I too was skeptical that the analog vinyl records are superior to CD, But if you look at 2 pictures side-by-side of the same thing, one from film and another a digital, you realize that the film picture is much clearer and colors are more vibrant, truer, and the colors have more of a "snap" to them. In contrast, the digital images appear muted, faded, and lifeless. In digital images, you can record several million colors; in film probably a few billion colors; but in nature there are trillions of colors. I am sure that it happens in sound also.

RKLee
04-08-2007, 05:48 PM
.
.
I have Cream's 'Wheels Of Fire'; Iron Butterfly's 'In-A-God-A-Divita' (I think I spelled it right...); and a number of others on CD, that in my opinion sound like crap compared to the LP's, even after spending hours fiddling with the EQing and other parameters on my system. My son got a Black Saboth CD a couple years back, and we played it on my sound system. I then dug out my LP of the same (It was 'Iron Man') from way back when, and the difference in the sound quality was like night and day. The LP sounded sooooo much better than the CD.

I have mentioned on this forum in the past that I have mind f#@ked many so-called audio files who think they are on top of the world with their hi-end boutique gear when they hear my vacuum tube 5 channel monster playing vinyl through JBL/Altec speaker from the good old days. Gee what fun!

Kind regards,
Charley

We are showing our age. I haven't played my copy of "In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida" by Iron Butterfly since the early 1970s, and lately I recently decided to set up my old audo equipment. I actually played "In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida" by Iron Butterfly on my old Dual 1209 with a Shure M97ED cartridge a few weeks ago, and my 19 year old daughter comes by and says "hey! I've heard that song," and I go WTF!(I was truly surprised) really? It was on the Simpson's TV show. Go figure, the show's creator Matt Groenig must be from our generation.

duaneage
04-08-2007, 07:11 PM
The Shure V-15 V is a great cartridge for archiving, Sony and a few other companies use them for archiving vinyl. It's got unbeatable tracking adn a flat neutral sound that is fair and even. I use one ( used it tonight) to archive my vinyl into the computer and I'm happy with it.

Shure quit making them last year because the berrilyum used in the cantilever was too hard to get. The needles are available for only 4 more years and that is it. I would get a spare needle if you plan to keep it all.

RKLee
04-08-2007, 08:41 PM
duaneage (http://www.audioheritage.org/vbulletin/member.php?u=1334): Thanks for the warning. I didn't know that they are going to stop making the stylus for the V15 type IV.

BTW: I also have a Infinity Black Widow GF arm, should be an ideal combonation.

Funny, I haven't used my sound equipment for 20 years or so, and I lost one of the plastic mounting screws for the V15 type IV, I called Shure Parts, and the lady had only ONE last screw kit for this series of cartridges, WHEW! It wasn't the lightweight plastic ones though, this was all steel. Oh well beggars can't be choosers.

Personally for me, after a leave of 20 years from audio, I can't believe there is still so much interest ancient vinyl equipment it is unreal.

hjames
04-09-2007, 01:36 PM
Any thoughts on Stanton cartridges?
I used to use the 681 EEE back in the day, but - that was quite a while ago ...
thought, comments?

SEAWOLF97
04-09-2007, 01:48 PM
What have you done with your records??



My dotter, who lives in Germany , picked up most of my good ones and handcarried back to Whuppertal. She is a DJ once a week on the local station, and gets many compliments on music that no one there has ever heard.


Starts her show with 13th floor elevators - "too much to Dream last Night"

Hoerninger
04-09-2007, 01:52 PM
My dotter, who lives in Germany , picked up most of my good ones and handcarried back to Whuppertal.


That has surely been a good idea.
Do they have a live stream?
___________
Peter

SEAWOLF97
04-09-2007, 03:15 PM
That has surely been a good idea.
Do they have a live stream?
___________
Peter

sounded like a small station , I think she wud have told me if there was streaming. She plays small clubs too.

My son is a psychology major and this term he had to pick one class that was not related to his major. So he picked "the history of Rock & Roll". Says he really likes the class and they dissected Calpton lyrics the first day. A nice relief from the heavier classes.

jim campbell
04-09-2007, 05:21 PM
What have you done with your records??



My dotter, who lives in Germany , picked up most of my good ones and handcarried back to Whuppertal. She is a DJ once a week on the local station, and gets many compliments on music that no one there has ever heard.


Starts her show with 13th floor elevators - "too much to Dream last Night"
caught ya ......... that was the electric prunes....the elevators big hit was youre going to miss me,the one from hi fidelity............

SEAWOLF97
04-09-2007, 05:27 PM
caught ya ......... that was the electric prunes....the elevators big hit was youre going to miss me,the one from hi fidelity............

you are right Jim...I didnt have the album to refer back to.

jim campbell
04-09-2007, 05:28 PM
Any thoughts on Stanton cartridges?
...
thought, comments?from what i recall the stantons were popular with the dj crowd as they were well built and could take it.radio stations used to like them as well.i used a denon 103 s moving coil with a pre pre and it was excellent.

fotodan
04-10-2007, 05:43 AM
Any thoughts on Stanton cartridges?
I used to use the 681 EEE back in the day, but - that was quite a while ago ...
thought, comments?


Heather, the 681 EEE's are still keepers. I had a chance a couple of months ago to to compare 681's to Shure V15 IV's, the EEE's walked all over the IV's. Of course it could just be that I have managed to keep 2 EEE's in stock since my first system back in 73. And remember they are the calibration standards. I clean my records yearly with VPI record cleaning machine, and check stylus with 10X loupe, stills looks brand new.
Nothing like pulling a cleaned 30 year old album and hearing it without the snap, crackle, and pops. Will bring a smile to your face everytime..:applaud:

MJC
04-10-2007, 07:02 AM
Heather, the 681 EEE's are still keepers. I had a chance a couple of months ago to to compare 681's to Shure V15 IV's, the EEE's walked all over the IV's. Of course it could just be that I have managed to keep 2 EEE's in stock since my first system back in 73. And remember they are the calibration standards. I clean my records yearly with VPI record cleaning machine, and check stylus with 10X loupe, stills looks brand new.
Nothing like pulling a cleaned 30 year old album and hearing it without the snap, crackle, and pops. Will bring a smile to your face everytime..:applaud:
I used the Shure V15 III, IV, V from the late '60 until about '88. By that time CDs were the thing, and none of the stores around here had ANY replacement stylus. Then I found a little shop in Carson City that had a cheap Pickering, that thing would jump track everytime the canons went off on the 1812 Overture.
Thanks to the internet, we can have a choice again.
Right now I'm using a Shure M97.
I've used, for years, a spray solution on my records, that you buff with the supplied buffer, keeps the records clean and static free.

SEAWOLF97
04-10-2007, 07:30 AM
Have used most all "popular priced" cartridges. Currently have V15/4 in the Dual 701 and no complaints. Maybe the best I've owned , always had Shures, Stantons , ADC , Pickerings , B&O ...etc....no really high enders.

Hoerninger
04-10-2007, 07:44 AM
... that thing would jump track everytime the canons went off on the 1812 Overture.

There has been an investigation of the track (from a Teldec record as far as I remeber):
It has been impossible to any stylus to follow exactly. :(
They all would jump more or less.
____________
Peter

Grumpy, your follow up made me thinking, you are right. Thank you.

grumpy
04-10-2007, 09:49 AM
There is a Teldec recording, but I think you may be referring to the Telarc 1812... ca 1978. -grumpy

Steve Schell
04-10-2007, 11:52 AM
The Telarc 1812 Overture LP is indeed a severe tracking test for cartridges. The cannon shots are so abrupt and explosive that it is hard to tell by ear if any mistracking is taking place (unless it throws the needle across the room, of course).

I remember reading in a high end mag years ago that someone had looked at the cannon shot grooves with a microscope and determined that the cutterhead had maxed out and clipped some of the biggest signals. Still, the recording sounds pretty good to me.

The direct to disc recordings issued by Crystal Clear titled "The Fox Touch" volumes 1 and 2 also contain some of the strongest low frequencies captured on LP. These pipe organ performances by Virgil Fox, mastered on site by Stan Ricker, feature extreme shuddering pedal fundamentals and sound very clean to me when using a Denon DL-103 cartridge.

Titanium Dome
04-10-2007, 07:25 PM
Vinyl records can become even more useful and valuable with a little effort. I'll never have to buy another bowl.

Titanium Dome
04-10-2007, 07:29 PM
I've always enjoyed music at work, and more than any other medium, vinyl is key to my productivity.

Titanium Dome
04-10-2007, 07:31 PM
Many of my first dates were made more special with a vinyl platter spinning in the ol' Magnavox stereo console. Even today, nothing sets a romantic mood like vinyl.

Titanium Dome
04-10-2007, 07:33 PM
Music has a timeless quality to it, and nothing preserves it better than vinyl.

Titanium Dome
04-10-2007, 07:36 PM
In this iPod Age, vinyl is critical for keeping the audiophile heritage alive. Nothing says high end like vinyl, and I'd much rather take it with me into the street as a fashion accessory than a stinking iPod.

Titanium Dome
04-10-2007, 07:39 PM
Vinyl and holidays go hand in hand for us old timers. "White Christmas," "Frosty the Snowman," "The Messiah," Deck the Halls," all were better on vinyl. Now I have vinyl featured throughout the Season right on my tree for all the see. "Deck the Halls" with holiday vinyl, I say.

Some oil paints, your grandkids, and an oven can make a vinyl album into a treasured holiday heirloom, keeping the vinyl heritage alive from generation to generation.

duaneage
04-10-2007, 09:17 PM
The stanton 681 and the shure v-15 are very different cartridges, I would not compare them at all. The 681 tracks very heavy and is designed to take DJ abuse. The V-15 can track 60cm/sec and that was never surpassed to my knowledge. It was the best tracking cartridge made, and it tracked the 1812 as well.

Beyond the heretic hype and mystic mayham, there is serious engineering in that cartridge.

http://www.shure.com/stellent/groups/public/@gms_gmi_web_ug/documents/web_resource/us_pro_V15V_ug_27A1658(BE).pdf (http://www.shure.com/stellent/groups/public/@gms_gmi_web_ug/documents/web_resource/us_pro_V15V_ug_27A1658%28BE%29.pdf)

The V-15 is considered a reference cartridge. Entire websites are dedicated to flamewars over one cartridge or the other, with different sides throwing mud on each other's favorite. The V-15 is a legend, I paid a premium 2 years ago for mine since they were discontinued and feel lucky to have one. I desired a V-15 since I was in high school and it took me 20 years to get around to buying one.

Even the best setup sounds bad and tracks poorly unless properly aligned. I check my setup every once in a while for static pressure, actual tracking force, antiskate, and of course overhang and alignment.

Record playing is tedious but in this instant on, gotta have it world, there is something serene about pulling a record from the shelf, cleaning it, playing it and appreciating every minute of it. The best part of all is not having to deal with any digital rights management, I bought it, I own it, I play it, and now one knows or charges me for the privlege.

Rolf
04-11-2007, 10:36 AM
The Telarc 1812 Overture LP is indeed a severe tracking test for cartridges. The cannon shots are so abrupt and explosive that it is hard to tell by ear if any mistracking is taking place (unless it throws the needle across the room, of course).

I remember reading in a high end mag years ago that someone had looked at the cannon shot grooves with a microscope and determined that the cutterhead had maxed out and clipped some of the biggest signals. Still, the recording sounds pretty good to me.

The direct to disc recordings issued by Crystal Clear titled "The Fox Touch" volumes 1 and 2 also contain some of the strongest low frequencies captured on LP. These pipe organ performances by Virgil Fox, mastered on site by Stan Ricker, feature extreme shuddering pedal fundamentals and sound very clean to me when using a Denon DL-103 cartridge.

As far as I have been told there are NO cartridge that are able to reproduce the canons on the 1812 and the Fox touch without a lot of coloration. Most cartridges will almost "jump off" the record.

I had these records for some years ago, using a very expensive cartridge with some of the best compliance, looking at the needle through a magnifying glass when it enter the almost square cuttings on the record, and there is NO WAY this could have been reproduced accurately.

On a CD, witch i got for 1812 this is no problem, and on this you really got the feeling standing beside a cannon.

BEWARE: play it to loud an your amp and speakers will sound no more.

rs237
04-11-2007, 11:08 AM
hello

i love the cannons ( acoustic ! ).

regards
juergen

hjames
04-11-2007, 11:30 AM
Woohoo!
The Telarc CD of this Kunzel recording is available used for under $2.00 at Amazon (under 4.50 shipped!)!
I've got other versions already but - BANG - thats a done deal!


Awesome - I loves me some cannons on big wooooofers!

(gonna move that kitty!)



hello

i love the cannons ( acoustic ! ).

regards
juergen

jblnut
04-11-2007, 01:22 PM
Record playing is tedious but in this instant on, gotta have it world, there is something serene about pulling a record from the shelf, cleaning it, playing it and appreciating every minute of it. The best part of all is not having to deal with any digital rights management, I bought it, I own it, I play it, and now one knows or charges me for the privlege.

Amen :applaud: :applaud: :applaud:

Count my vote for the AudioTechnica OC9. It's a beautiful sounding low (mid really) output moving coil that's still in production. Check www.needledoctor.com (http://www.needledoctor.com) for this and other current cartridges. I've been a customer of his for some time and he has some great suggestions for cartridges.

jblnut

duaneage
04-11-2007, 04:20 PM
Amen :applaud: :applaud: :applaud:

Count my vote for the AudioTechnica OC9. It's a beautiful sounding low (mid really) output moving coil that's still in production. Check www.needledoctor.com (http://www.needledoctor.com) for this and other current cartridges. I've been a customer of his for some time and he has some great suggestions for cartridges.

jblnut

The OC9 is another underated gem of a cartridge, great tracking and excellent frequency balance. I had a Audio Technica LS400 for a long time and I liked it. THe channel separation was 31 db at 10Khz and if needles were still available I would have another headshell with it mounted. Speaking of headshells, anyone know where i can get one for my Denon DP-37F? I think all Denon's were the same back in the 80's.

hjames
04-16-2007, 02:37 PM
Bravo, Rolf!
The Telarc CD arrived today and we put it on HK CD changer, through the HK receiver, the 552 crossover and all that biamp JBL stuff (but no amp for the 380 subwoofer currently). 2 channel analog stereo mode.
I let it run at the 16dB down setting - Whaaahoo!

Glorious cannon shots, to be sure - thanks for the tip!


... On a CD, which i got for 1812 this is no problem, and on this you really got the feeling standing beside a cannon.

BEWARE: play it too loud an your amp, and speakers will sound no more.

MJC
04-16-2007, 08:11 PM
As far as I have been told there are NO cartridge that are able to reproduce the canons on the 1812 and the Fox touch without a lot of coloration. Most cartridges will almost "jump off" the record.

I had these records for some years ago, using a very expensive cartridge with some of the best compliance, looking at the needle through a magnifying glass when it enter the almost square cuttings on the record, and there is NO WAY this could have been reproduced accurately.

On a CD, witch i got for 1812 this is no problem, and on this you really got the feeling standing beside a cannon.

BEWARE: play it to loud an your amp and speakers will sound no more.
The Shure V15 Type III, IV cartridges will play the canons with no problem. I can't say the same for Pickering.
Vinyl recording is still better than the cd. But how many have heard the SACD version of the 1812? Now that is far superior to cd.

rs237
04-16-2007, 11:32 PM
My EMT Player with TSD15 cartridges will play the canons with no problem.
I am also the opinion that the Vinylaufname sound better than the CD. With the SACD always switches my amplifier off with “DC error”.

regards
juergen

MJC
04-18-2007, 04:47 AM
My current cartidge, Shure M97, will play all the canon shots, except the last one. It seems to only get part of it.
I was listening to the SACD version this morning, just great at -15db on the volume control. That must be a completely new recording, as it has a chorus track in it that the LP an CD don't, and of coarse, multichannel.

I was just looking on Jerry Raskin's Needledoctor web site. There was 133 turntables listed. I never knew there were so many turntables. I noticed there were a number of Denons, Duals but no Gerards, Yamaha, all brands from the past. But most were brands I've never heard of. They were listed by price, starting at $100,000.

$60K for a pair of Everest, ok
$100K for a turntable, I don't think so.